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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2008
    Posts
    4,577

    Default Your child and their "paci"

    Wee Spot is year old now, and still on a "binky".

    He doesn't freak if he doesn't have one, though seems to sleep better with one. He'll also pick one up in plug it in if he finds it during the day. Which means he usually has one during the day. He's an explorer of the first order and can find one he lost a month ago, whether it have been hidden in the decorative milk jugs or under the couch.

    I do have concerns that it's keeping him from saying as much as he might without one. He's certainly more vocal with out it, but will also talk a bit around it.

    When did you pull the pacifier from your child? Why? If they didn't appreciate it, what did you do to make things easier? Am I doing something not cool by still letting him have it when he wants it?

    What are the pro's and con's of the spawn having one/not having one?
    "Aye God, Woodrow..."



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2006
    Location
    Cheesehead in Loudoun Co, VA
    Posts
    2,380

    Default

    My spawn spit his out at 9 months and never looked back.
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2006
    Posts
    343

    Default

    At about a year, I pulled "soo-soo" from daytime activities. It was allowed to stay in her crib/bed.
    I don't think I worried about night time soo-soo until she was just slightly after 2 years. And then I secretly took scissors to all of them and cut little x's in the nipples, so suction power wasn't that great. .
    A week later, we had the soo-soo fairy chit chat and one night the fairy came and took them all away, to pass on to other newborn babies. You have to work up to that, in conversations.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 15, 2008
    Posts
    4,577

    Default

    Thanks, gang.
    "Aye God, Woodrow..."



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2010
    Location
    california
    Posts
    3,888

    Default

    Hi Long Spot. I never used one for my children. Good luck !


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2008
    Posts
    946

    Default

    The Griffyn the Younger tossed his out of the crib at 6 months! Oh boy the night time bottle (he doesnt sleep with it, just wants his milk before bed) is so hard to be rid of. Now I work primarily 3rd shift so Lil Grif sleeps alot of different places (ok he sleeps around alot for a 2y ear old) at Meema's, the sitters so its more of a comfort/stability thing, but how I long to be rid of those things.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2011
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    2,061

    Default

    I had one until I was two, which I was in love with - and called my doodle-doo - until was finally taken from me against my will. Within a week, I stuck my thumb in my mouth, where is stayed until I was 10.

    Not sure if that is helpful lol
    Barn rat for life

    The Big Horse


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2012
    Location
    Crestview, Fl
    Posts
    441

    Default

    Little Airman had his until he was about 16 months old. We had a medical TDY to Hawaii and they "got lost in the bags" he was fine from day 1 pretty much. I was blessed with the easy transition.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2004
    Location
    Upper Peninsula, Michigan
    Posts
    2,082

    Default

    My son has those wubbanub pacifiers-- the type with the little animals sewn on. He uses them in the car, when he's in his bed at night, and snuggling w/me before bed. If he's tired he will ask for one and then i know it is time for bed. During the day he puts them in his bed (usually without prompting; it was his idea in the first place to throw the "wubbles" in his bed). Because he's not got them in the day he's developing language at a steady rate. Can you transition to only bed time/nap time?

    ETA: Because he's not using a pacifier during the day, I'm in no hurry to take them away. When that time comes, i may just snip off the pacifier part and let him keep the animals.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,122

    Default

    My daughter LOVED her binkies. She would go to sleep with one in her mouth, one in each hand and would rub one of the ones in her hand on her face as she fell asleep! LOVED her binkies. They never stopped her from talking, she had a huge vocabulary for a year old-walking and talking, looked like a little alien. When she was about 1 1/2, we went to the beach. At the beach, we broke the news to her that the garbage man took her binkies. (Had someone at home search the house and remove them ALL, including ones on her babydoll toys!). She whimpered a bit going to sleep but she sat straight up in the middle of the night and yelled 'Mommy! Mommy! Binkie in car! Man didn't get!" I had to show her that yes, he did lol. By the time we got home, she was out of missing it. Worked well that way. Good luck, it's tough when you know you can stop their crying so easily :-(
    Kerri



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 8, 2002
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    9,407

    Default

    Mine never started, so I have little advice. But someone said something on one of the other kidlet threads to the effect of, "it's not like your kid will be ________ years and still ________."

    In my case, my kid won't be 18 and still nursing to sleep. I'm sure minispot will move on from the paci when he's ready and you won't be sending him to kindergarten with it. He might be talking more without it, but given how much little kids can talkandtalkandtalkandtalk I wouldn't be in too much of a rush about that.

    I think little kids need comfort stuff, whether it's a pacifier or comfort nursing or a little lovey blanket or whatever. You know him best and when he's developmentally ready to let it go and move on, you have more than enough creativity to make the transition
    "smile a lot can let us ride happy,it is good thing"

    My CANTER blog.


    2 members found this post helpful.

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