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  1. #241
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunny59 View Post
    Ah, but who do you know that goes to WM for customer service? They go there for low prices, plain and simple. Around here I hear people complain all the time about the Walmart employees. There are plenty of disgruntled ones walking around, but it doesn't really hurt the bottom line because WM doesn't pretend to be a service oriented store. It's all about price.....
    And that said, there are plenty of unhappy WM workers that still take pride in their work and do a good job, despite being shafted..... The discontent is there....
    This.
    If I knew what I were doing, why would I take lessons?

    "Things should be as simple as possible,
    but no simpler." - Einstein


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  2. #242
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunny59 View Post
    Ah, but who do you know that goes to WM for customer service? They go there for low prices, plain and simple. Around here I hear people complain all the time about the Walmart employees. There are plenty of disgruntled ones walking around, but it doesn't really hurt the bottom line because WM doesn't pretend to be a service oriented store. It's all about price.....
    And that said, there are plenty of unhappy WM workers that still take pride in their work and do a good job, despite being shafted..... The discontent is there....
    Once again I have to say that there apparently must be a lot of disparity in Walmarts from location to location. While I'm certainly not going to claim that everyone at our Walmart skips around like Rebecca from Sunnybrook Farm, for the most part they're always smiling, joking, & more than helpful when asked. Have never encountered any surliness, even during crowded holiday times. I've never specifically seen anyone behaving like they'd much rather be somewhere else. (Certainly no more than anyone working anywhere would rather be somewhere else.)
    Last edited by Bacardi1; Nov. 26, 2012 at 09:11 AM.


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  3. #243
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    Once again I have to say that there apparently must be a lot of disparity in Walmarts from location to location. While I'm certainly not going to claim that everyone at our Walmart skips around like Rebecca from Sunnybrook Farm, for the most part they're always smiling, joking, & more than helpful when asked. Have never encountered any surliness, even during crowded holiday times. I've never specifically seen anyone behaving like they'd much rather be somewhere else. (Certainly no more than anyone working anywhere would rather be be somewhere else.)
    I have known some of the ladies at our WM for a good 15+ years.
    They go out of their way to be helpful, so much when I had been sick and had my arm on a sling as to keep an eye for me and help me reach stuff up high and such nice touches.
    I then went to the managers and told them so, which they appreciated.
    The ladies found out I had done so and thanked me, while they seemed very happy, not worried about needing any help about being appreciated by management, as they should not, as they have been very good workers for long already.

    I am sure if you ask anyone doing any job anywhere, they can tell you what they would like changed, what they don't like but make do because it is their job.
    Is there some working for WM that is not good in general and should be changed and makes sense to change?
    That I don't know.


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  4. #244
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    "According to an article on the employee search firm website, KeyStone, the cost of filling a vacant position is between 75 and 150 percent of the position's annual pay. The article also compares the human resource practices of grocery giants Costco and Wal-Mart to illustrate how differences in employee policy can greatly affect turnover rate, and in turn, profits. Although Costco's employee compensation includes generous benefits and pays its people approximately 65 percent more than Wal-Mart, Costco earns a significantly higher profit-per-employee margin than does Wal-Mart. The reason: Costco has a 6 percent first-year turnover while Wal-Mart's is almost 50 percent."

    http://smallbusiness.chron.com/emplo...ery-15810.html
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


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  5. #245
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    Once again I have to say that there apparently must be a lot of disparity in Walmarts from location to location. ... I've never specifically seen anyone behaving like they'd much rather be somewhere else. (Certainly no more than anyone working anywhere would rather be be somewhere else.)
    I think there must be a wide disparity among stores and between areas. There certainly is no reason why a good area or store manager cannot choose to be more accommodating in terms of work hours, conditions, emergency leave, etc., than what the corporate SOP's would allow that manager to get away with. No doubt there are places where many of the workers and managers have been working together for years and have informal understandings and mutual respect, likely in smaller more rurally-located stores. My guess that environment was the rule rather than the exception when Sam Walton was living.

    But there is a "work" face and a "private" face. We all have had at some time or another to present a neutral face to the workplace or to customers that didn't match up with how we felt at the time.

    I've seen frontline folks at WM who were as helpful and accommodating as can be, and I've had run-ins with WM managers who went out of their way to be nettlesome, clearly without a lick of common sense, the long-range best interests of the company, or elementary management training. (I guess one I have in mind forgot that customers don't have to put up with the pettifogging work rules they can get away with inflicting on their subordinates. My fear that day was that after I left the manager would punish the clerk who had tried very hard to be helpful to me. Had I not been on a tight schedule, I would have sought out the store manager to complain.)

    Talk to the folks behind the cash register or in the departments when they're not backed up. Or just look at their affect as they go about their job. I still can't get over the multiply-confirmed knowledge that in three different states and with no exceptions anywhere I've had the chance to inquire, a great many WalMart customers are unpleasant and abusive to the staff. Not so, Target customers though I haven't as much data. Possibly this is a matter of demographics both for the workforce and the customer base.
    If I knew what I were doing, why would I take lessons?

    "Things should be as simple as possible,
    but no simpler." - Einstein



  6. #246
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    Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't Sam Walton pride himself on paying living wages and treating employees like family (while promoting American-made goods) and that it was after his death that his heirs decided to cut corners to maximize their personal profits?
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.


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  7. #247
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    I've also read analysis that Walmart's high turnover rate in the first year of employment is intentional...high turner equals less chance of union organization. If you read the reference I posted above though, it's really not a good management practice.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


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  8. #248
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    Interesting that everyone is complaining about Walmart as if they were the only one who dared treat their employees this way; what about the other corporations that pay a less-than-living-wage, few to no benefits, forces one to work holidays, etc?

    McDonalds
    Burger King
    Wendy's
    Target
    Walgreens
    CVS
    Dollar General
    Dollar Tree
    Dollar Store
    Village Inn
    K-Mart
    Movie Theatres
    Etc.......


    I was also a juror on a trial that was related to the "Evil Walmart not paying overtime" story that was in the news a few years ago.....it was quite interesting how slanted those news stories were, and how many of the facts were left out to make the corporation itself look worse.


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  9. #249
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    [I]The article also compares the human resource practices of grocery giants [B]Costco and Wal-Mart to illustrate how differences in employee policy can greatly affect turnover rate, and in turn, profits.
    Comparing WalMart and Costco is a bit like comparing the liquor store downtown with the wine store in an affluent neighborhood. Boiling it down to an employee issue and ignoring that they serve a completely different markets with different products makes the comparison almost nonsensical.

    For those of you with your panties in a twist over WM's use of part time workers to avoid paying benefits it's going to be fun to sit back and watch your heads explode in the next few years as more and more businesses are going to start using this tactic to try to survive the Affordable Care Act.


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  10. #250
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    Ah, but you missed in the article I quoted that QuikTrip was one of the companies that were held up as an example.

    http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/pol...onl041379.php#
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  11. #251
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Ah, but you missed in the article I quoted that QuikTrip was one of the companies that were held up as an example.
    There are many ways to run a company. Since you obviously think it so easy why don't you get out there start one, grow it the size of WM, then run it the way you think it ought to be run?


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  12. #252
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunny59 View Post
    Ah, but who do you know that goes to WM for customer service?...
    We've had problems with a few WM products, but the customer service has always been excellent as far as giving a refund or replacing the defective item. It's far better than Sears, J.C.Penny, and Radio Shack (aka Rat Shack to the ham radio community), to name but a few. With very few exceptions, the associates are courteous and timely with their help.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams


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  13. #253
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    McDonalds--420,000 employees (2011)
    Burger King --34,248 employees (2011)
    Wendy's --42,800 (January 1st, 2012)
    Target --365,000 (2012)
    Walgreens -- 176,000 (2012) of which my sister is one and says holiday work is on a volunteer basis with overtime pay. She always volunteers.
    CVS--80,000 (2005)
    Dollar General --90,000 (March 2012)
    Dollar Tree--54,480 (2010)
    Dollar Store (Family Dollar)--45,000 (2009)
    Village Inn--can't find employee info
    K-Mart--355,000 (2006)
    Movie Theatres--too vague for employment figures

    Walmart--1.4 million US employees (2010, which at the time was 1% of the US working population)

    So maybe it's not so much that Walmart is teh great ebil, but that they control such a large portion of the workforce. They used to have a high standard of employment that made them far more attractive than other companies. Now, they're the biggest employer and feel they can do whatever they want, especially since it's an employers market and people are scared to death they'll lose the little income they have. They can treat employees like dirt because they know there are more suckers just waiting to take their places.
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.


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  14. #254
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    Reading through this whole thread, the most shocking part of the comments here are the general consenus of the people who feel that walmart employees should make more money also seem to think that walmart is the absolute only place to work. How do you think small business (aka JOBS) are started?

    People see a nich in the market (like picking up dog poo, mowing lawns, chopping firewood, cleaning houses, taking care of farm animals), and realize people will pay them to do it. So they work hard to do it. If they are good at it, eventually they will need to expand. Imagine if this was a former walmart employee who did this. Since we could assume they are friends with their former coworkers, they could possibly hire other (former) walmart employees to assist them, and the worker could learn a marketable skill and, in theory, be paid more.

    AND, as an added benefit, if enough former walmart employees do this, the supply of workers available for employement at walmart will become lower. If the supply becomes lower, walmart will be forced to pay more to attract workers. In additional to learning the skill, they would learn about business practices, finances, and customer service.

    So, how is it a bad idea that workers of walmart take it upon themselves to realize a nich in their market, and fill it? Why is it so bad for people who work at walmart (assuming they are unhappy with their position) to create a new job for themselves? Yes, there would be risk involved, which is not for everyone. But the risk pays off for those who can apply themselves (see all sucessful small businesses).

    As a side note, I keep getting reminded of the South Park episode about Walmart all through this thread. giggle.


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  15. #255
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    Quote Originally Posted by PlatinumVt View Post
    Reading through this whole thread, the most shocking part of the comments here are the general consenus of the people who feel that walmart employees should make more money also seem to think that walmart is the absolute only place to work. How do you think small business (aka JOBS) are started?

    People see a nich in the market (like picking up dog poo, mowing lawns, chopping firewood, cleaning houses, taking care of farm animals), and realize people will pay them to do it. So they work hard to do it. If they are good at it, eventually they will need to expand. Imagine if this was a former walmart employee who did this. Since we could assume they are friends with their former coworkers, they could possibly hire other (former) walmart employees to assist them, and the worker could learn a marketable skill and, in theory, be paid more.

    AND, as an added benefit, if enough former walmart employees do this, the supply of workers available for employement at walmart will become lower. If the supply becomes lower, walmart will be forced to pay more to attract workers. In additional to learning the skill, they would learn about business practices, finances, and customer service.

    So, how is it a bad idea that workers of walmart take it upon themselves to realize a nich in their market, and fill it? Why is it so bad for people who work at walmart (assuming they are unhappy with their position) to create a new job for themselves? Yes, there would be risk involved, which is not for everyone. But the risk pays off for those who can apply themselves (see all sucessful small businesses).

    As a side note, I keep getting reminded of the South Park episode about Walmart all through this thread. giggle.
    well, the local walmart employs - for argument's sake - 200 people.
    The area hardly supports 1 pooper scooper....I don't see it taking off to employ 200....

    There are alternatives. Sure.
    For people with drive and imagination.
    And luck.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  16. #256
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    For many of us rural shoppers the coming of Wal- Mart was the end of shopping anywhere else. As small mom and pop stores who had been a small town staple folded we are out of options to get the things we need. As much as I dislike shopping at Wal- Mart, I can't afford to drive 35 miles one way in 3 different directions every week to do my shopping.

    I have heard about the low wages and the complaints of the workers. I have worked hard at a few jobs for very low wages and I was thankful to have a job and in my thinking the employees at Wal-Mart should be thankful to be working as well. I stayed at my jobs until I was able to find something better. There is nothing stopping them from doing the same.


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  17. #257
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    Quote Originally Posted by HighFlyinBey++ View Post
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but didn't Sam Walton pride himself on paying living wages and treating employees like family (while promoting American-made goods) and that it was after his death that his heirs decided to cut corners to maximize their personal profits?
    You are absolutely right. Wal-Mart was a different place when Sam Walton was alive. The products were american made( as much as possible) prices were good , stores were a lot smaller and I do believe he paid his workers well. When the kids got the business it became all about the money.


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  18. #258
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    well, the local walmart employs - for argument's sake - 200 people.
    The area hardly supports 1 pooper scooper....I don't see it taking off to employ 200....

    There are alternatives. Sure.
    For people with drive and imagination.
    And luck.
    The pooper scooper was an example.

    I don't believe in luck. I believe in opportunity. There are many opportunities for those who open their eyes to them. If they have the mindset that "it's walmart of I'm on unemployement/welfare", then that's what they will be stuck with.

    But if they have the mindset of "lots of trees came down during the latest storm, I should get my chainsaw and advertise because many people don't feel safe handling a chainsaw", then that's when they get ahead. I'm not saying it's easy, but instead of feeling like a victim, stuck with the cards they were dealt, it's taking charge of their life.

    It's saying things like "there are retired/disabled people in my community, they may like a service where I deliver their goceries to them." It's realizing that even though they may not have a specialized education, there are still things they can do for the community that can grow into something bigger.

    Perhaps even keep working part time at walmart, and start small with a part time business, for minimal risk. They don't have to sit at home and just wait for the government funds to make up for low pay.


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  19. #259
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    well, the local walmart employs - for argument's sake - 200 people.
    The area hardly supports 1 pooper scooper....I don't see it taking off to employ 200....

    There are alternatives. Sure.
    For people with drive and imagination.
    And luck.
    Yup - it's wonderful to be an entrepreneur, but there's more to it than even "drive, imagination. And luck". Beyond that there's that old bugaboo "location, Location, LOCATION".

    We're a relatively rural area with more farmland & farmers than suburbanites. Very few, if any, folks around here are going to pay someone to scoop their dog's poop. Ditto for firewood chopping/splitting. There may be a couple of housecleaning companies around, but the few local ads I've seen were by nationwide chain franchises. As for lawn mowing? You could spit in any direction & hit at least 10 private lawnmowing/landscaping trucks on a daily basis.



  20. #260
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Ah, but you missed in the article I quoted that QuikTrip was one of the companies that were held up as an example.

    http://www.washingtonmonthly.com/pol...onl041379.php#
    Doing a quick search (no pun intended) QT average pay ranges from $8.66/hr. (clerk) to $11.29/hr. for assistant managers; not quite the living wage people are demanding on the other thread. The QT website has hourly cashiers starting at $8/hr.

    Interestingly, glassdoor.com which matches the QT wages listed above has Walmart wages as averaging $8.44/hr. for cashiers and starting department managers at $11.15.

    Trader Joe's is better at $10-13/hr. starting pay, but not quite the $40-60,000 yr. starting wages often touted.

    None of these are a "living wage" as determined on the other thread, yet only one is "the evil empire".


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