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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2002
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    4,914

    Default does anyone here care for the intellectually disabled?

    we do, in our home and it's the most amazing work.
    it's a bit unfair i get paid to do something i love, but love it i do.
    so much so that i am moving away from the agency placement system and seeking privately funded clients to grow my business and to accomplish my goals of providing the 'horse' lifestyle to women who otherwise would have no hope of hoses in their lives.

    anyone else care to have a discussion about it?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,660

    Default

    I'm not sure what that means, could you explain it?
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2009
    Location
    New England
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    1,381

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by suz View Post
    women who otherwise would have no hope of hoses in their lives.
    Ok, got a chuckle out of that one!
    Last edited by Shine; Nov. 23, 2012 at 10:35 AM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
    Location
    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
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    11,821

    Default

    I'm all for bringing hoses to the hoseless. I think everyone should have access to a good hose and that by having a good hose, it really brings happiness and a sense of belonging to people when they can stand up and shout "I have a hose!".
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!


    9 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    Boogerville, USA
    Posts
    858

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    I'm not sure what that means, could you explain it?
    I don't know what it means, either.
    We all must deal with stupid people, daily, don't we?

    Oh, NO!!! Don't tell we're no longer allowed to say 'stupid' anymore??


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2002
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    OMG! that is entirely NOT what i meant,lol.
    in fact that is another business entirely!

    i provide a home and family life for a disabled man now. he is in his fifties, mildly intellectually disabled and retired from his janitorial job.
    he is not my ideal client, as he has no interest in horses, but he and dh are buds and he's relatively easy to get along with.
    i hope to provide a home and the equestrian life for women who are unable to live alone safely. at this moment in time i have room for two women and hope to grow into a home for more someday.
    i have several wonderful people to help and together we envision a community of maybe 8 women and staff who spend days at the barn, maybe with a part time job or volunteer work if they are interested and capable.
    i know many of us (like me) were 'pony possessed' from the moment we could focus on the beasts, and i'm betting there are parents out there wondering what this horse business is all about and how can they get their disabled adult kid involved in the life.
    now to find those parents with the funds to place their daughters with me so we can spend our days playing with ponies together.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    42,946

    Default

    As a psychology student, part of my practice/lab work was working in an orphanage for several months, some of those living there 24/7.
    The group I was assigned to had three adults, one was the resident nun, although it was a state run orphanage.
    In our group there were kids from 4 to 7 and a few older ones, too handicapped to quite move on to the next, older group.
    We had at that time 24 kids and 8 of those were mentally and two physically handicapped.

    We attended to all their needs, from getting up hygiene and getting dressed in the mornings and put to bed at night and, sleeping in the same dormitories, helping with any night problems like waking up with nightmares or wet beds.
    We were there thru every meal and lessons and helping with spare time activities and field trips.
    We truly lived with them every minute of the day.

    We had all the kids participate in helping each other.
    I loved the work there.
    We had a bit of farming and a dairy.
    I would have stayed there permanently if we had horses.

    I have to say, in your situation, that there are several adults helping, that you can manage some local volunteers to also help, would be a great resource for those families that could use somewhere like your farm to place their needy family members and feel they are safe there.

    Let us know how it goes for you. Best of luck.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,700

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    Since you are in New England find some Morgan Horses to use as they appear to be more sensitive to special needs.

    We have used ours with inter-city kids and with intellectually disable adults... the horses quickly sense the specific needs and will adjust their behavior as needed.... this is one of our fire breathing eventers at a middle school were the students were special needs...some physically handicapped such as the one in the wheelchair... this mare picked that girl out as some one who was being overlooked and walked over to her putting her head down in the girls lap... the girl started to cry... I stepped in to remove the mare, but the girl said no other animal ever has liked me.

    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...lastscan-6.jpg

    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...ayatschool.jpg


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Aug. 10, 2010
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    Western NY
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    1,698

    Default

    Oh, Clanter, bless you....



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    If you need extra horses, you may do as our horse assisted therapy groups does, use suitable local horses we loan to them for a few weeks/months at the time.
    We have loaned them several of our older ranch horses and the work they do is wonderful by any measure.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by HPFarmette View Post
    Oh, Clanter, bless you....
    "that" girl who just can see a little of in the first phot --she is on the leftside, mare's nose is pointed at her--a few years ago obtained her PhD in social sciences... I just believe our little mare's insight changed her life


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    "that" girl who just can see a little of in the first phot --she is on the leftside, mare's nose is pointed att her--a few years ago obtained her PhD in social sciences... I just believe our little mare's insight changed her life
    Wonderful, thanks for letting us know.



  13. #13
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    Jan. 27, 2002
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    Default

    great info and insight people, thanks so much!
    and clanter morgans may well figure(he he, get it?) heavily in our program moving forward.
    my home will be but a tiny niche, as my target demographic are
    physically healthy, high functioning, intellectually disabled adult women.

    in other words women who may well have jobs and whose disability makes it unsafe or unwise for them to live without support and frankly, protection.

    my goal is to create a community for us all to live together sharing the joys of horses. it's been in my head for years now, that there must be a group of 'my' women whose families don't get the horse thing but do get that their daughter could live in a private home instead of an institution.
    plus most therapeutic programs don't address the person who is physically fit but doesn't learn as easily. but i do and can provide the lifestyle in a safe and supported way.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Quote Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post
    I'm all for bringing hoses to the hoseless. I think everyone should have access to a good hose and that by having a good hose, it really brings happiness and a sense of belonging to people when they can stand up and shout "I have a hose!".
    Yes I care. I, too, am all for hose-owning stupid people.



  15. #15
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    Sep. 17, 2003
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    AridZona
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    Default

    I couldn't do it, but I think it is an awesome thing for you to do.
    Delicious strawberry flavored death!



  16. #16
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    Feb. 27, 2004
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    I guess that is what I do, my developmentally delayed 31 yr old son lives here with us. He's pretty independent. He's like a 10-12 yr old boy. I call him my forever boy. He does his own laundry, and most of his own food. (mainly because he's picky and wants to eat when HE wants to eat.) He does some chores, mows grass, loads and unloads the dishwasher. Keeps an eye on his Aunt's dogs. He feeds my animals, (dogs, horses, sheep, cats...) when I'm unable or gone. So he's really pretty helpful. I have to admit I'd miss him if he were gone.

    What your doing sounds really nice.


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  17. #17
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    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by suz View Post
    great info and insight people, thanks so much!
    and clanter morgans may well figure(he he, get it?) heavily in our program moving forward.
    my home will be but a tiny niche, as my target demographic are
    physically healthy, high functioning, intellectually disabled adult women.

    .
    yes I noticed or could say Figured it out justin time ...

    I followed your mission on the other board, you will be successful as your goal is in your heart

    I think you know our Morgans, we found the breed very resourceful and adaptable

    this is one of the fire breathing dudes my daughtet evented

    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...er/trinity.jpg

    be he loves the kids who think of him as Spirit

    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...udreeandPI.jpg

    and the gang with a group from the intercity
    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...r/MVC-003S.jpg



  18. #18
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    Jan. 27, 2002
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    Default

    aw thanks. it is my passion, and someday i will provide a home for women without the funding if all goes according to plan.
    i'm also looking into returning vets with tbi who might benefit from my long or short stays in my home.

    it's so cool how the universe is providing---it occurred to me to broaden my vision to women returning from combat, and a few weeks later i re-connecct with an old childhood friend. guess where she works? at a tbi unit and not only is ready for a change but shares the horse passion--which is why we were friends as kids,lol!

    in my dreams my home sharers own and ride and care for their own horses----for sure i'll be looking at morgan rescue when the time comes.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2005
    Posts
    1,044

    Default

    In my last job I tutored about eight mentally challenged adults in basic reading and writing and it was one of the most rewarding jobs I have had the pleasure of performing. It was definitely challenging at times but helping my students improve (or even just maintain) their reading and writing abilities was such a job. Some of the sweetest people I have ever met, many of whom our traditional education system was unable to support in their growing up years.

    Your program idea sounds awesome suz!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2005
    Location
    Mass.
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    6,693

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    There are not enough people like the OP. I could never work in social services but I am in awe of people who spend every day helping those who are mentally ill or disadvantaged.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



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