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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2002
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    Default Horse's feet not right after shoeing - WWYD?

    Hello all. Got to the barn the other day and my horse "waddled" a bit when I took her out of her stall. Shorter steps than usual, almost trippy. I looked at her feet and they looked much shorter than usual, and much more upright, as though a lot of toe had been taken off. (Shoes were otherwise the same -- plain shoes on all 4.) I wasn't horrified by any means, but it didn't look like her usual shoeing. I found out by one of the trainers that she was trimmed (possibly shod, too, but definitely at least trimmed) by one of the usual farrier's assistants.

    When I got on, she started out short in front, and didn't seem like she wanted to really get moving. After a few minutes, she seemed more like her usual self, but had an ouchy step here and there that I would attribute to being a little foot sore.

    I'm not a shoeing expert at all, and like I said, she's not lame, so I hate to question a professional... but I don't love how her feet look, especially given that they look so different than usual.

    Farrier sends bills in the mail. Would it be wrong to write a note with my check and just say I'm concerned or confused? What about saying I don't want her trimmed by an assistant? At what point am I overstepping bounds as a non-hoof expert?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 25, 2008
    Location
    Goshen NY
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    2,627

    Default

    I would call the farrier rather than writing a note. My farrier and I have been working on one of our horses and he definitely wants to know the next day how the horse is doing.

    I wouldn't accuse him of using an assistant just noting to him that you think something is wrong. I also wouldn't say they don't "look" right but tell him you do feel a difference when riding and note the facts when you speak to him.

    Good luck!!!
    Sorry! But that barn smell is my aromatherapy!
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    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
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    Default

    If horse is noticeably not walking right and sound, that equals "lame" - that's how it works. A horse is either sound or it isn't.

    I woudl call the farrier and discuss.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2009
    Posts
    8,618

    Default Jingles for your mare ~

    Jingles for your mare ~
    Zu Zu Bailey " IT"S A WONDERFUL LIFE !"



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2012
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    1,706

    Default

    I'm not a shoeing expert at all, and like I said, she's not lame
    yes,she's lame based on your other comments. Stepping short in front and trippy in contrast to before shoeing is lame.

    If the horse is equally lame/sore on both front feet he won't necessarilly head bob. It is amazing how many people including farriers don't seem to understand this.

    My ex farrier did not know this. If no head bob- he argued- not lame- nevermind horse could barely shuffle along after his trim jobs.. arghh a pet peeve



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2010
    Posts
    548

    Default

    Take his shoes off for a few days ( take him for a ride) and see if he is lame, then you will know for sure if he is lame or not.
    Charlie Piccione
    Natural Performance Hoof Care



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2009
    Posts
    834

    Default

    You are describing a lame horse. She is equally lame on both front legs, so she is not bobbing her head. Call your farrier and tell him she is short and sore all around. A good farrier wants to know when something is wrong. If he gets defensive, find a new farrier.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2002
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    Lots of M states...
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    Default

    Sorry, you're correct. She did come out of her stall lame. She did, however, work out of it under saddle, enough for very light flatting over the last few days.

    What about regarding his assistant? Is it okay to ask that he not touch her next time, or is that crossing lines?

    Edited: By not touching her, I mean working on her feet.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2001
    Posts
    15,232

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Charlie Piccione View Post
    Take his shoes off for a few days ( take him for a ride) and see if he is lame, then you will know for sure if he is lame or not.
    oh wow.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2006
    Posts
    156

    Default

    I would call the farrier, he could have set a nail wrong or maybe he noticed something NQR, but shod thinking it was nothing b/c the horse was sound. I know farriers as a group are sometimes not the most receptive, but even mine would have a conversation with me if I had a concern about my horse. It could be unrelated to the shoeing, but it doesn't hurt to start there b/c that is what has changed most recently. Good luck.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2012
    Posts
    610

    Default

    Op you are never out of bounds questioning 'anything' and everyone about a procedure being done to your horse. You should be asking whatever questions you need to it is your horse and you are paying for the service.

    I made the mistake ...once...in letting a well known extremely popular farrier trim my horse when I was not present. He was trimmed so short he was lame for a long time. My rule after that was to always be present during any vet or farrier procedure and i am not shy. I currently have a great farrier and I still make him measure toe lengths if it doesn't look right to me. It has been a good rule!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Louisville, KY
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    Default

    Call. Tell him the trim is not right and the horse is lame. Ask him to come out to see for himself. Then ask him what he proposes to do to fix the problem and make it clear you do not want the assistant to work on your horse again.
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2012
    Posts
    151

    Default

    I used to use one of the best & most respected farriers in my area. Unfortunately I can never be at the barn for new shoes because of my work schedule. My horse was constantly being shod by the assistant and I was having issues with the work. I asked that the farrier do the work himself (instead of the assistant) but nothing changed. I had to switch farriers.

    I was polite about it and the farrier & I are still on good terms, but it's my horse and my money - she needs to be shod correctly & by the farrier, not the assistant.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
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    4,501

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ticker View Post
    Op you are never out of bounds questioning 'anything' and everyone about a procedure being done to your horse. You should be asking whatever questions you need to it is your horse and you are paying for the service.
    Agree. CALL your farrier now. He/she won't be able to know what happened if you wait until the next time he comes out. Ask him to come and look at the shoeing job and soundness. Presumably he would WANT to come and see for himself what went wrong.

    As for whether or not to use the assistant; that is a tough call for the internet crowd to determine.

    But either way - if the farrier OR his assistant lamed a horse, he should want to see it, figure out what happened, and a way to avoid/address it now and in the future. (If not, then I'd be finding a new farrier!)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    10,429

    Exclamation

    I would have called the farrier immediately. I would still call the farrier. It is possible that he can apply temporary pads as it is extremely likely that his assistant has trimmed too short. Worse yet the horse could be off balance besides.

    Make no accusations unless you can verify them, however the farrier must have it made known to him that the quality of the work was unacceptable., or there will be a repeat!!!!
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Default

    Upon finding something that was not "customary and usual," you should have immediately called the farrier and discussed it with him. Everybody makes mistakes. However, one cannot correct mistakes that they do not know about.

    If I make a mistake on a clients horse and instead of telling me about it and giving me the opportunity to make it right, the client went on the Internet to complain, I would be very pissed off.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LMH View Post
    oh wow.
    Yup.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 23, 2002
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    Ontario Canada
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by arlosmine View Post
    You are describing a lame horse. She is equally lame on both front legs, so she is not bobbing her head. Call your farrier and tell him she is short and sore all around. A good farrier wants to know when something is wrong. If he gets defensive, find a new farrier.
    DAMIT Meant to hit thumbs up. Sorry arlosmine.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2002
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    Default

    Sorry, not trying to complain by any means. I just could imagine being a farrier and having someone think they know more about feet, when in reality, they do not. I don't want to come across as a know-it-all or unappreciative of his work. I will call him tomorrow. Thank you for the feedback. As a sidenote, another horse at the farm came up lame after shoeing, too :-(



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
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    Northeast
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    Default

    By saying the horse is "not right" or off, you're not saying you know more about feet. You are stating a fact.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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