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  1. #1
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Default Dog with seizures and aggression...any chance for a positive outcome?

    A friend of a friend has a fairly new dog, 5 years old. He was fine with them for several weeks, had never shown any signs of aggression at his previous (rescue) home. He was found wandering loose with another dog.

    He's become progressively more aggressive, towards other dogs, towards anyone at the door, outside, on his property.

    He's had one grand mal seizure and has head tremors.

    I say it sounds neuro to me. Their vet has done blood work, tick panel, thyroid testing and has come up with nothing. Oddly, they say the vet has ruled out epilepsy because of the blood work. They're not willing or able to pay for an MRI and, instead are working with a behaviorist.

    Any ideas?
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  2. #2
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    Jun. 15, 2010
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    Default

    Sounds neuro to me



  3. #3
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    Jul. 26, 2001
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    Well yes,seizures (and tremmors) are certainly a neurological condition! Is the dog not being managed?

    New vet needed. You can absolutley NOT rule out epilepsy with bloodwork!!!

    Sounds like the dog needs to be on phenobarb, keppra, KBr..or something to control those seizures!!


    See a neurologist! Behaviorist can come second!!



  4. #4
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    Nov. 2, 2006
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SquishTheBunny View Post
    Well yes,seizures are certainly a neurological condition! Is the dog not being managed?

    New vet needed. You can absolutley NOT rule out epilepsy with bloodwork!!!

    Sounds like the dog needs to be on phenobarb, keppra, KBr..or something to control those seizures!!



    See a neurologist! Behaviorist can come second!!
    Ditto


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    Default

    It's called "idiopathic epilepsy" when we don't know WHY but they're still having seizures. If he's having smaller seizures and doing fly biting behavior, etc, it could be that his aggression is tied very closely to all of that. They are essentially in a fog after a seizure.

    Situation sounds to be no fun at all.

    Good luck.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  6. #6
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    Sep. 17, 2003
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    Just one seizure doesn't necessarily mean epilepsy. When I had an epileptic dog, we waiting to diagnose until he showed a history of it (more than just one) and then started meds. No MRIs - he was a classic idiopathic epileptic. FWIW, he was NEVER aggressive as a result of his epilepsy (or anything else), although some dogs might be during postictal state or due to medications or general disposition.
    Delicious strawberry flavored death!



  7. #7
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    Default

    He continues to have head tremors. My cocker had partial complex seizures and was really out of it when coming out of one, but this is different, he's very aggressive towards strangers or anyone other than family on his property. It started just 2 weeks ago, grand mal seizure came first.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  8. #8
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    Apr. 10, 2006
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    It sounds neuro to me.

    We had a male Golden that was always a bit "off." Then he started having grand mal seizures, sometimes many a day. We took him to a neurologist and had a work-up done, though we did stop short of an MRI (at that point we had invested 5k into him and just couldn't do more.) The neurologist's opinion was he had a brain tumor.

    We managed his seizures as best we could until he became aggressive, and then we had to put him down, as he had zero quality of life and was a danger to us, our other dog, and himself.

    I would bet $100 the dog in question has a neuro issue and I will bet another $100 that a behaviorist is not going to do squat. Having lived through this scenario and seeing how heartbreaking it is for the people involved, but most especially the dog, I honestly would put the dog down.

    ETA: I could be wrong, but my understanding is that seizures can damage the brain. It is quite possible the dog has suffered some sort of brain damage as a result of the grand mal seizures.
    We couldn't all be cowboys, so some of us are clowns.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Nov. 7, 2008
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    Pittsburgh, PA
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SquishTheBunny View Post
    Well yes,seizures (and tremmors) are certainly a neurological condition! Is the dog not being managed?

    New vet needed. You can absolutley NOT rule out epilepsy with bloodwork!!!

    Sounds like the dog needs to be on phenobarb, keppra, KBr..or something to control those seizures!!

    See a neurologist! Behaviorist can come second!!
    This would be my thought also. It's unfair to the dog to be enforcing behavior expectations that the dog plain and simple can't meet because of a health problem that's not being treated. And it's just going to frustrate everyone and increase the risk of someone getting seriously hurt because the actual problem isn't being dealt with.

    We had a Rotti/GSD rescue when I was younger who ended up needing phenobarb every day because of a seizure, and once he got in the habit of taking pills it was no big deal at all and he was fine and back to his normal self. He never had aggression issues, though. But I can see how that might happen depending on the dog's personality. My dog now, Pirate, is much more nervous and less self-confident than some other dogs, so I can see how he could turn into a dog with fear-aggression issues if he was feeling significantly unwell in some way and felt like he had to protect himself. (Particularly if something had happened not long after I got him - I've had him for five years now and he trusts me to handle things MUCH more than he used to, which has reduced his anxiety significantly.)



  10. #10
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    Mar. 4, 2010
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    Default

    I'd wonder about a brain tumor. The combination of seizure activity plus behavior changes just points that way to me.

    StG


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    I'll keep you updated. So far, they are refusing to pursue a neurologist. I'm afraid this may end badly. It was pointed out to them, by another friend who had a dog with similar symptoms that if and when he bites someone, he will die alone and afraid at Animal Control.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    I'll keep you updated. So far, they are refusing to pursue a neurologist. I'm afraid this may end badly. It was pointed out to them, by another friend who had a dog with similar symptoms that if and when he bites someone, he will die alone and afraid at Animal Control.
    I would go further and remove the 'if' - it sounds like the way things are going, he will end up biting someone. Not through malice, but because he has a problem which is not being treated appropriately, and dogs only have so many ways of communicating.



  13. #13
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    Full time in Delhi, NY!
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    I'll keep you updated. So far, they are refusing to pursue a neurologist. I'm afraid this may end badly. It was pointed out to them, by another friend who had a dog with similar symptoms that if and when he bites someone, he will die alone and afraid at Animal Control.
    If this dog ends up being PTS, I will not consider it a bad ending. Any dog that is aggressive like this is fearful, and fearful is no way to live. I, too, believe there is something neuro going on and I'd say a brain tumor. Better to put down now and do a necropsy for closure.
    ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
    Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

    "Life is merrier with a terrier!"



  14. #14
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    Sep. 5, 2005
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    Brain tumor or some other disorder. If they're not going to seek out a specialist, then put the animal down so it's not suffering any more.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  15. #15
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    Mar. 25, 2011
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    Default

    Wow, this isn't going to end well. The Neurologist will tell them if it is behavioral and if they can't help. We had this happen a few times when I worked for a Neurologist.

    There is also a form of rage epilepsy. I saw it a few times, once was a Yorkie, the other a Pitbull. The owners of the Pitbull did not have children and had managed him for years and it wasn't easy. I know he recommended euthanasia in both cases as they are a liability.

    Brain tumors also cause agression and I have seen it in dogs and cats. (Doesn't have to be malignent, can be a menengioma.) Unfortunately, brain tumors know no age. I handle all of the MRI's for our hospital and often the brain tumor patients can be agressive, they just can't help it.

    If these people don't get the proper help, this is not going to end well, at all. Idiopathic epilepsy does usually show up in younger animals, and is most often managed by a general practitioner. Epilepsy cannot be eliminated by blood work.



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