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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2000
    Location
    Southern Pines, N.C.
    Posts
    11,587

    Default Keeping the clipped horse warm while being turned out

    I have just clipped my horse for the 2nd time this fall. I always make sure he is comfortably warm with a blanket and, neck cover if necessary, when outside. But I am thinking that his legs and tummy are telling his hairs to grow because they are cold.

    I do not like to t/o in standing wraps because of the possibility of the wrap coming undone. But what about shipping boots? They go all the way up and if the velcro comes loose, I would not worry about the horse getting a bandage bow.

    My horses live outside 80% of the time, coming in only when the temp is below 30 or it is raining.

    I have no idea why this issue has never come up before in my 30 years of keeping horses..... But now that it has, I cannot decide on the best course of action.
    "I used to have money, now I have horses."



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,405

    Default

    No wraps or shipping boots for all day turn out!

    I do not think the temperatures actually make their hair grow – if that was the case, horses here in CA would all be nice a slick all winter!

    If you are already on your second clip (I am as well), sounds like you clipped fairly early when their coat was still coming in. First clip of the season will always grow out quickly if you did it early. This second clip should last longer.

    If you are concerned that the horse is cold, try a blanket liner with a belly band. How cold does it get in NC?


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2012
    Posts
    324

    Default

    No boots. They could get wet and nasty, cause rubs, fungus, etc.

    OR you could look into the winny warmers.....not sure how practicle those are either but they look cute.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 30, 2008
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    369

    Default

    I wouldn't put anything on the legs. did you fully clip the horse or just a trace/partial clip and left the leg hair?

    if you left the leg hair,it shouldn't make the horse colder.

    the sunlight tell the hair to grow and you would be surprised at how fast!
    *Member of the Quality Free-Choice Hay/Pasture Feeders Society* Member of the As Much Turnout as Possible Group* FEED by WEIGHT not VOLUME*



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,997

    Default

    That is definitely not how it works. Don't put anything on his legs while turned out.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,892

    Default

    Horses grow hair as a result of day length. Not cold.

    When I clip, this is about the time I always wind up doing a second clip. Third clip is usually late Jan/early Feb.

    I have never seen any reason to think my horse was bothered by the cold on their clipped legs and belly.

    IOW, it's not broken. No need to "fix"


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 31, 2003
    Posts
    18,472

    Default

    Just wrap him up unless it is over 60 and no wind on a sunny day, I at least sheet clipped horses. The only exception would be one that shows me they want less clothes, by sweating or acting uncomfortable.
    "Kindness is free" ~ Eurofoal
    ---
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,844

    Default

    Feed extra hay if you are concerned about him not being warm enough.
    I wouldn't wrap a horse that is turned out.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,824

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Appsolute View Post
    I do not think the temperatures actually make their hair grow – if that was the case, horses here in CA would all be nice a slick all winter!
    I can only assume that this research was not done by vets that actually studied coat differences in horses that live out in -40C vs those that only "coat up " for -15C ... move the same horse from area A to area B & after a couple winters of transition, winter coat will be rather different.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,405

    Default

    ^^^ yes, I could understand that extremes will produce some coat difference in some horses.

    Our overnight “lows” are in the +40s, and days are in the 60+ range in the winter days. And yet many local horses still grow very thick coats – which leave them sweating in the middle of the day. If local temperature (and not sunlight and genetics) was the dominate control regarding coat length, you would think that these horses wouldn’t grow such a coat!

    My TB lived in very snowy area of eastern WA state before I purchased him. Despite living out (for three years), he grew barely any winter coat, and could not cope with the weather unblanketed.

    So yes, perhaps over years, in extreme temperatures, as genetics allow, a horse will grow a thicker coat. I believe NC generally has overnight lows in the +30F range – I do not think that would be cold enough to prompt a yak coat.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    16,892

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    I can only assume that this research was not done by vets that actually studied coat differences in horses that live out in -40C vs those that only "coat up " for -15C ... move the same horse from area A to area B & after a couple winters of transition, winter coat will be rather different.
    Generally because those two locations are at different latitudes and the *light* is different...


    5 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2004
    Posts
    1,045

    Default

    While we are having an unusually cold start to winter in central NC, I don't think you need to worry.

    In my opinion, if it's cold enough to have a blanket on a clipped horse, it's cold enough to have a matching weight neck cover on them. If you're really concerned about chilly belly, a few places make bellyband turnouts.

    http://www.sstack.com/horse-blankets...band-turnouts/


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2009
    Posts
    6,824

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    Generally because those two locations are at different latitudes and the *light* is different...
    not so much - it's an east/west transition (inland vs the west coast); similarly, horses in a given location will "coat up" more some years than others despite effectively the same "light" situation ...
    I'm not disagreeing with the premise that changes in day length stimulate coat changes, but it is somewhat more complex than that ...


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2003
    Location
    Baldwin, MD
    Posts
    617

    Default

    Research has shown that it is a combination of photoperiod (day length), temperature AND genetics that prompt differences in hair growth. That being said, photoperiod is the main determinant in hair growth for the winter season. My mares still grow enormous shaggy coats every year even though we now live in Louisiana, where it's 80 degrees in November. :/



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jun. 6, 2012
    Posts
    140

    Default

    not sure how cold it is where you live but I'm in Alberta where it gets to be -20, -25, even -30 degrees celcius in the winter. For our horses that live outside most of the time we do a partial clip, leaving their legs and bellies since those are not covered up by a blanket.



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