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  1. #1

    Default Pastern Leukocytoclastic Vasculitis

    Hi Guys,

    Im new to this forum so first of all Hello to everyone

    So to start off with i will give you a little background info on what happened with me and my horse.
    In March 2012 my little arab gelding developed Greasy Heel on his back white leg/foot - I listened to the advice from my vet to soak the area with Malesab fungal wash and then gently pick the scabs off - then thoroughly dry and apply ointment to the area. The vet i was using at the time assured me this would clear up in a matter of days. Well it didn't and it actually got worse and worse - after about 2 weeks of persveering with this GH i rang my vet that i usually used (she was away at the time my horse first got the GH) - She quickly came out and put my horse on a round of anti-biotics and we cleaned up his leg as much as possible.
    Still to no avail did this condition go away it kept coming back worse and worse! After another few vet visits he was put on a different anti biotic as she belived it wasn't GH but another seconday infection that developed whilst we were treating the GH. We had a little success with the new Anti Biotics and new creams and when it looked like it was getting better all of a sudden it would go down hill again!
    After what seemed like weeks and weeks of this my vet decided it was time to do a Biopsy.
    This then led to the results of PLV.
    Now we knew what this condition was we treated it as best we could - we put him on a round of steriods (prednisolone) and a new cream aswell. We stopped scrubbing the area as that was actually making it worse and we wrapped it to keep it clean and dry. We also shaved the area to give us better access to the yukky spots.
    This was now about 7 months ago and since then i have had several reaccurances of this condition - mainly when i had him in work as he is my endurance horse and he leg sweated and cracked.
    Basically what i'd love to know is how other people manage this condition - I am forever getting up in the morning before work and just gently wiping the leg clean or any dirt etc and applying zinc cream to the area for the day (as its summer time here now) ... this is everyday. I do not have a stable that i can put him in during the day so that he's out on the sun so thats out of the question.
    I feel like i have tryed everything. I went away for 4 days and my parents had forgotten to put zinc on his leg and when i returned his skin was all peely like it was dryed out from the sun and a couple of scabby spots had returned that quickly!
    I have since ordered a pair of summer whinneys online that i have only just started using as of today so i guess we'll see how that goes.
    He is only 5 years old so we have a long long road ahead of us if i have to forever apply zincs etc to his leg everyday.
    I get really depressed over this and sometimes wonder why this ever had to happen to my sweet little boy, he is such a good horse and puts up with me trying out all these new things. I just wish we could find something that would work consistently for him.
    Thanks for listening and thank you in advance to anyone that may reply with any info for me.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,698

    Default

    You can read about all my drama with my old horse on here. The thing that finally worked with my old horse was genesis spray and oral pentoxifylline, in addition to the pred and antibiotics. I worked with the dermatology dept at uc davis. Have your vet call them.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2007
    Posts
    951

    Default

    Same sort of deal here, except I knew of PLV and after seeing it not act like classic scratches I had a biopsy done.

    It came around quite quickly once we used the following things;

    Silvadene cream (Rx only) slathered on lesions, then telfa, then standing wrap. Oral antibiotics & pentoxifylline - some vets don't carry the pentox but it's an important part of the treatment.

    I cannot remember if the dressings were changed every day or every 48 hours. Once they have PLV everything is REALLY pissed off, so don't scrub pick or do anything to further irritate.

    The leg started making good progress, but about a week in we started using the Genesis spray instead of Silvadene. This Genesis spray is MAGIC! It looked dramatically better in the first day. It's also very easy to use because it's a nice light spray, not oily or greasy.

    It's important the skin doesn't have sun exposure. It may not be fully healed, then exposed to sun & why you are having re-occurances. Until it was completely healed, we kept a leg fly wrap on - I found the Cashel brand worked well (depends on where on the leg it is). If the horse is turned out at all, it needs to have something over the affected area to prevent sun exposure. Once it was all cleared up and the hair regrown - I have not had to do that. I did not have any re-occurances.

    Also, when the lesions & skin were healed but it still was in the process of growing all the hair back I was worried about rubs from work boots or the fly boots. I found that using J&J rolled gauze on the leg under the boot worked well to prevent rubs plus absorb any sweat (cotton).

    Good luck!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
    Posts
    8,698

    Default

    Oh... And let the hair grow back and never clip it again!!!

    I am convinced it often starts from some irritation, a lot of the times from clipping the legs. I am pretty sure thats how my horses started one summer. White legs need leg hair!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 19, 2012
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NorCalDressage View Post
    Same sort of deal here, except I knew of PLV and after seeing it not act like classic scratches I had a biopsy done.

    It came around quite quickly once we used the following things;

    Silvadene cream (Rx only) slathered on lesions, then telfa, then standing wrap. Oral antibiotics & pentoxifylline - some vets don't carry the pentox but it's an important part of the treatment.

    I cannot remember if the dressings were changed every day or every 48 hours. Once they have PLV everything is REALLY pissed off, so don't scrub pick or do anything to further irritate.

    The leg started making good progress, but about a week in we started using the Genesis spray instead of Silvadene. This Genesis spray is MAGIC! It looked dramatically better in the first day. It's also very easy to use because it's a nice light spray, not oily or greasy.

    It's important the skin doesn't have sun exposure. It may not be fully healed, then exposed to sun & why you are having re-occurances. Until it was completely healed, we kept a leg fly wrap on - I found the Cashel brand worked well (depends on where on the leg it is). If the horse is turned out at all, it needs to have something over the affected area to prevent sun exposure. Once it was all cleared up and the hair regrown - I have not had to do that. I did not have any re-occurances.

    Also, when the lesions & skin were healed but it still was in the process of growing all the hair back I was worried about rubs from work boots or the fly boots. I found that using J&J rolled gauze on the leg under the boot worked well to prevent rubs plus absorb any sweat (cotton).

    Good luck!
    Thanks so much, just a quick question what is the full name of the Genesis Spray? Would I need to ring a vet to obtain this?

    Thanks



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2007
    Posts
    951

    Default

    http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...m?pcatid=10827

    Here it is - made by Virbac. It's made for dogs. Very similar to Panalog except not oily & greasy. It is Rx only.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2007
    Posts
    951

    Default

    http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/ceh/do...-1-bkm-sec.pdf

    Here is a write up from UCD that discusses it - actually I think the PLV picture is Perfect Pony's horse?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2003
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    8,698

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NorCalDressage View Post
    http://www.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/ceh/do...-1-bkm-sec.pdf

    Here is a write up from UCD that discusses it - actually I think the PLV picture is Perfect Pony's horse?
    Yep, I'm famous! My horse was actually one of the first to try the genesis and pentoxifylline treatments. It worked amazing. All the hair grew back and years later he never had another flare up.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2012
    Location
    Boise, Idaho
    Posts
    322

    Default

    My friend's horse had this. She struggled with it for nearly 2 years until a vet suggested the PLV. It affected all 3 white feet and he would swell a lot. The vet's feeling was that it was
    a photosensitivity developed from a reaction to alfalfa and/or clover (legumes). He would develop it in July or August and she would fight it (unfortunately like "normal" scratches) until finally getting it cleared up in February or March only to start in again July/Aug. When this vet saw him, he told her to remove alfalfa from his diet and he mixed her a goo of DMSO and dexamethasone. It was a miracle in clearing it up. He never had another bad bout of it. If he started to peel, she would use the magic goo and it would clear right up.
    So, I don't know much about the alfalfa angle but removing it from his diet helped immensely.

    Susan



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 11, 2009
    Posts
    87

    Default

    My horse has PLV and we (meaning my vet and myself) have found a way to control it. To give a little background, I tried to battle what I thought was "chronic scratches" on my horse for over a year, and had many different vets look at him and try every possible scratches remedy that was out there. Only his hind legs were affected, and coincidentally those are the legs he has his two white socks.

    Because of the mud last winter (our ground never froze), my horse did not go outside for about four months because the mud was too deep and I was worried that it was going to make his scratches worse. Well, after four months of having clean and dry legs and not going outside, I knew that this was not normal scratches. We had his legs cultured and all tests came back negative for anything bacterial or fungal. At this point we were stumped as to what could possibly be going on with his legs. He was consistently on antibiotics for secondary infections - he would have bad blow ups about once a month.

    Luckily, I was able to talk to someone who I knew was having similar problems with her horse a few years back. She told me about her conversations with the dermatologist at UC Davis and how her horse was eventually diagnosed with PLV. Thats when I found the article that was already posted on here as well.

    My vet and I decided to start a steroid treatment of Dex for two weeks. His legs began to look much better, however on the last day of the heavy two week dosage, his legs blew up again . We took him to MSU Vet School the next week and they gave us a new spray to use (I'm not sure what all was in it, but I do know that it contained DMSO and Scarlet Oil) and told us to keep his legs completely covered and out of the sun, and to not shave the hair on them.

    Well, I purchased these wonderful boots called "Equi-chaps" (http://www.equestriancollections.com...upcode=WE80010) that my horse now wears whenever he is turned out (which is about 6-8 hours a day). I started using them around the end of April and my horses legs have never looked better. He has not had one lesion, the hair is all grown back, and there is no more swelling. His legs look normal again! He is so much more comfortable and happy. You would never be able to tell that he has PLV.

    I always try to keep his legs clean and dry because I know his skin is very sensitive on the white areas. I no longer shave the hair there either. I am so thankful that we found a way to control this. I am also thankful that he only has two white socks, and not four!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 19, 2012
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Thank you so much everyone for your replies.
    Yes it seems i'll have to keep my horses leg completly covered during daylight hours then as this seems to be when it flares if it doesn't have zinc on it. But even then i dont think the zinc completly helps either.
    So if i went into the vets would they supply me with the genesis spray?

    SMNG just in regards to those boots do they make the horses legs sweat or hot in summer? I have some summer whinny socks i have just started trying today so not sure how we'll go with these yet might be good to have a back up

    Does anyone apply any sort of cream or anything to the leg before its covered with a boot or wrap of some sort or just leave it be once its all healed?

    Thanks again x



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 19, 2012
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    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NorCalDressage View Post
    http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...m?pcatid=10827

    Here it is - made by Virbac. It's made for dogs. Very similar to Panalog except not oily & greasy. It is Rx only.
    Thank you So this is ok to use on horses then? I rang my vets but they had never heard of it before?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 7, 2007
    Posts
    951

    Default

    Yes, it's fine to use on horses. UC Davis dermatology dept recommends it for this, as well as my vet that was dealing with my horse.

    If your vet is unfamiliar with it, or hesitant to prescribe, the best thing might be to see if s/he will call Dr. White in the dermatology dept at UCD. Here is his info:
    http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/faculty/sdwhite/

    Regarding the cream under the boots - My horse was in the Silvadene, telfa, cotton standing bandage until the lesions resolved. Once that was done, the skin didn't have any more open sores, but it was pink and had zero hair still. At that time I only sprayed the Genesis spray, let dry for a few mins, then wrapped the cannon area in rolled cotton gauze. Because there was zero hair I was afraid she would get rubs from the fly boot or turnout boot. This prevented that. Then when the horse came in to the stall after turnout, I would remove the boot and gauze, spray with Genesis again and leave the leg naked.

    Also, if I needed to wash the leg (which I only did about every 2 or 3 days) this shampoo was recommended to me. You can get it without a script. It's made by the same company that makes the Genesis spray.
    http://www.entirelypets.com/seboluxp...FYl7Qgod7ycAmw



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 19, 2012
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    5

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    Thanks again everyone for your replys, i really appreciate it!

    I do however have one more question, what exactly should I be feeding him - Ive heard just a very basic diet? Just Hay and no supplements or grain feed? As this is an autoimmune disease feeding him supplements may not be helping?

    I usually just feed him morning and night - Wheaten Chaff with a small cup of cool command pellets and just a small scoop of equilibrium or livamol for his coat. Would this be bad for the immune system?



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
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    Default Very timely topic-thank you

    My girlfriend alerted me to this topic as I've been dealing with 'scratches' for 2 months now in the pastern region.

    First off, it actually started when we had dry weather. No mud. My pastures and sacrifice paddocks aren't muddy anyway, even after a monsoon due to #2 gravel and stonedust out about 30' from the stalls and a gradual sloping of the ground away from the stall area. Unless the weather is really bad, the horses aren't shut in stalls, but have access to one all the time. While my guy prefers to defecate in his stall, I'm still out cleaning it from 6:15 AM, all day and evening till 10 PM so he's not standing in manure.

    We've tried cleaning with Betadine Shampoo and using an 'Excema Ointment'(EO) the vets mix up which is a combination of 40% Desitin, 40% Furacin, and 20% Dexamethasone. It's helped some but still not doing the trick. At one point, the vet added DMSO to the EO, and had me wrap the horse. I got one leg wrapped, was just starting the 2nd leg and he about jumped out of his skin. The bandage went flying and scared the crap out him and he ended up completely turned around on the X-ties. You have to understand this horse is the model of quiet and sane to the point I call him boring so for him to twist on the ties and hop around like a nut is unusual to say the least.

    Also tried using a chlorhexidine and ketoconazole shampoo and EO ointment. Also tried a Sulphurated lime spray after the EO/DMSO ointment and that seemed to blister the horse.

    I've got a biopsy scheduled for this Thursday morning to see if we can pinpoint the cause. He's had mild 'scratches' before and always in the fall so I honestly suspect a plant allergy or morning dew as I only have them on grass pastures from about 7 AM to 5 PM. The rest of the time they are in individual sacrifice paddocks.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2007
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    935

    Default

    My horse had what looked like PLV but was actually a pseudomonas infection possibly brought on by a photo-sensitivity type reaction. Surprisingly the treatment is the same.....Genesis Spray was the answer.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2001
    Location
    virginia
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by NorCalDressage View Post
    http://www.drsfostersmith.com/produc...m?pcatid=10827

    Here it is - made by Virbac. It's made for dogs. Very similar to Panalog except not oily & greasy. It is Rx only.
    Well panalog is 4 diff meds combined in 1, and the Genisis seems to be only one ingrediant a steroid for anti inflamation....the triamcinolone....

    Panalog is : nystatin, neomycin sulfate, thiostrepton and triamcinolone acetonide.Nystatin is an anti-fungal. Neomycin sulfate is a broad spectrum antibiotic with activity against Gram-negative and Gram-positive skin pathogens. Thiostrepton is an antibiotic with activity against Gram-positive cocci, especially Streptococci spp. Triamcinolone acetonide is a glucocorticoid (steroid) with high anti-inflammatory, anti-pruritic and anti-allergic activity



  18. #18
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    Jan. 19, 2005
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    AZ
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    192

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    PERFECT PONY......I still thank you 6 or 7 years after suggesting Dr. White at UC Davis. After 2 biopsies, about $500 in topical meds, and 2-3 months of trying to rid my boy of his "scratches gone mad", the information from Dr. White did the trick.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
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    Default PLV

    roxxi_gurl89, I need to reread this entire thread as my horse was biopsied last wk, with the results coming back today as vasculitis. Vet didn't actually say PLV, just vasculitis but I had emailed this topic to them at the clinic with the practice to keep it in mind about my guy.

    First treatment regime we are doing is the dex and hope to see some improvement.

    It's dinner time so I'll come back and reread this thread.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Feb. 17, 2013
    Posts
    10

    Default Leukoctoclastic Vascilitis nightmare

    Hello Everyone

    This is my first attempt at posting on this forum, so please excuse any errors. I have avidly read as much about this condition as possible in order to help treat and hopefully cure my young horse. Alibi is a part-bred arab who suffered initially from mud fever (I believe another term for this is scratches) and who then subsequently, last October, was diagnosed with PLV,although I believe he started with the condition mid August. He is only 2 1/5 years old and has four white legs and is a skewbald (paint) horse. He was initially treated with Prednisolone and oral anti-biotics which seemed to stop the condition worsening (we also shaved and scab picked his legs) but did not and still has not brought the condition to a conclusion. The magic formula of Genesis spray is sadly not an option as we are in the UK and Virbac do not license its use here. I am in discussion with my vet over the use of Pentoxifylline but has anyone had any success with that alone ? He is currently on Dexamethasone 20ml once daily with daytime turnout in boots which cover him from coronet to knee/hock. His rear pasterns are always hot and also very swollen in the morning when he has been stabled all night, and daily turnout seems to help reduce the swelling. The lastest flare up was immediately after a 3 mile ride out (he was being led) and I wonder if exercise will exacerbate the condition. He is due to be started this year as a riding horse so I need to get this under control by then. Also he is on Hifi Lite (an Alfalfa based forage replacer) - is there still a train of thought that PLV could be diet related as an initial trigger ?
    Any help is so much appreciated. This is the only comprehensive information source I have found and there is so little knowledge of PLV in the UK.
    Thank you.



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