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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,083

    Default One more time around...I almost got it!

    I suffer from one-more-time-around-itis...I almost got it that time.

    Does anybody else think "I should quit now but I've almost got it; one more time around?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    No. Two reasons:

    1) I ski. It's always that last run that you end up injured on.

    2) I have had horses far too long. What ends up "one more time" can quickly become a "Lady, you had your freakin' chance, get OFF already" which results then in a lot more time to work through.

    I like to end on a good note and not push beyond exhaustion/boredom.

    But I hear what you're saying.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,083

    Default

    I had to laugh at that. I have learned the value of #2 but sometimes my daughter has to remind me...Mom, your done!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    I guess I should elaborate on #2.

    If it's the horse who almost has it but we're near the end of our time, I tend to ask for something I know they can execute well, then get off. I would rather end on a good note than create frustration especially if I don't have a lot of extra time.

    If it's ME who almost has it, I do the same as above because I don't want to sour an otherwise saint of a beast on the off chance I *might* finally get it right. THere's always tomorrow.

    Now, some might disagree, and I can understand that. Why stop at less than perfect? It's just that in my experience, I do better after letting things percolate a bit than I do trying to slam through.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2010
    Location
    Tucson
    Posts
    5,848

    Default

    The first lessons I took on horse training (as opposed to just riding) were with an old cowboy who taught that you should always end on a good note. He said if you're asking the horse to do something hard and the horse either won't or can't, but you then ask the horse to do something easy for it/which it will do, you stop after the horse does that easy thing and end on a good note where the horse doesn't feel as if it won.

    I still follow that theory 28 years later. My ride on Saturday was miserable. I'm coming back from a major back sprain and am very out of shape after months of inactibity, and my horse has bottled up his energy despite having plenty of space to run on his own. So Saturday he was pretending he's spooky (he's not) and generally being a pain in the rear, never focusing on me and certainly never relaxing. I got one canter circle in which he was moving through his back and stretched into contact 40 minutes into the ride and I halted and jumped off. It took 40 minutes to get anything right; had I waited and tried to get something really good, who knows how long I might have taken? Incidentally, when I got off I put him in his pen and he ran like there was a swarm of hornets after him, throwing in bucks and kicks and squeals as he went. It changed my mind about our ride to thinking it was an awfully good ride given he was under control the whole time and didn't get aerial despite his obvious excess energy.
    My horse is a dressage diva so I don't have to be.

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine
    If you have a fat gay horse that likes Parelli, you're really screwed



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    3,756

    Default

    Nope. I'm all for 'get a little effort towards what you want, then let them do something easy and stop'. Seen too many sour horses and injured riders from the 'keep asking until you get what you want, then do it again to be sure it wasn't an accident' philosophy.
    Lowly Farm Hand with Delusions of Barn Biddieom.
    Witherun Farm
    http://witherun-farm.blogspot.com/



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