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  1. #1
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    Nov. 13, 2010
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    Default Baytril?

    My horse is on Baytril and I have not been able to find much info on the drug.

    It seems to mainly be used in cattle? Just wondering what info others have. He was prescribed Baytril to combat Lmphangitis.



  2. #2
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    Mar. 24, 2004
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    My small animal vet has prescribed it many times for my dogs. I have never used it for horses.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)



  3. #3
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    On the spectrum of antibiotics, Baytril is towards the "cannons" as opposed to "BB guns" side. Broad spectrum. Used quite frequently in small animal medicine. It tends to be more expensive so isn't the go-to right off the bat in a lot of cases. But it's good for stubborn infections of the urinary tract, skin and other organ systems.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Nov. 30, 2005
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    Northfield MN
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRoo View Post
    On the spectrum of antibiotics, Baytril is towards the "cannons" as opposed to "BB guns" side. Broad spectrum. Used quite frequently in small animal medicine. It tends to be more expensive so isn't the go-to right off the bat in a lot of cases. But it's good for stubborn infections of the urinary tract, skin and other organ systems.
    Agree. I've seen it used for both dogs and horses. In horses, it is usually prescribed following a culture/sensitivity test due to expense. I have used it successfully for a bone infection, but , it was expensive!



  5. #5
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    Yeah, it's freaking expensive for a round of it for a big dog. I can't even imagine what it costs for a horse.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  6. #6
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Fort Collins, CO
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    Wow. Baytril is expensive for my CATS. I cannot even imagine how costly it is for a horse. I hope equines respond to a lower dose!

    I've always liked it in my small animals and it's been well tolerated by them.



  7. #7
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    I pay $250 for a 250ml bottle. That is usually plenty for a course.



  8. #8
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    Default

    Im able to get it less expensively than most. I have a friend at a very large equine clinic who has been very helpful. So far I have seen dramatic improvement in my horse's leg, hopefully it continues to improve.



  9. #9
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    Yes, best wishes for you!!!

    One important thing (on most abx) is drinking plenty of water. Just something to keep an eye on.

    Good luck!
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  10. #10
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    Aug. 22, 2009
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    Baytril is a quinolone antibiotic - like Cipro or Levaquin for humans. It is broad coverage as it has activity against gram +, gram - and also some anaerobic organisms. I can't speak specifically to Baytril but Cipro/Levaquin interact with divalent cations like calcium and magnesium - so are best given on an empty stomach and especially apart from any multivitamin supplements. They can cause GI upset/loose stool most commonly. Rarely they can cause heart issues such as prolonged QT interval and tendonitis/tendon rupture.



  11. #11
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    May. 17, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by SAcres View Post
    My horse is on Baytril and I have not been able to find much info on the drug.

    It seems to mainly be used in cattle? Just wondering what info others have. He was prescribed Baytril to combat Lmphangitis.
    My horse was on Baytril for 8 weeks for Pleuropneumonia, the culture came back that it was what would work best along with K Pen, not much helped until Dex was added to the list, along with 3 x's having tubes in to drain. Now finally he is on oral Chloramphenicol, from what the vet told me the danger of long term Baytril use is possible tendon/ligament damage.



  12. #12
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    Nov. 23, 2001
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    Yes, used it for my horse with a severe ear infection (rare). It did not respond to anything else for any length of time. Yes, expensive, but was worth it.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockfordbuckeye View Post
    Baytril is a quinolone antibiotic - like Cipro or Levaquin for humans. It is broad coverage as it has activity against gram +, gram - and also some anaerobic organisms. I can't speak specifically to Baytril but Cipro/Levaquin interact with divalent cations like calcium and magnesium - so are best given on an empty stomach and especially apart from any multivitamin supplements. They can cause GI upset/loose stool most commonly. Rarely they can cause heart issues such as prolonged QT interval and tendonitis/tendon rupture.
    It is given IV so stomach contents isn't an issue.



  14. #14
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    Apr. 6, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    It is given IV so stomach contents isn't an issue.
    It also comes in pill form - that is how I have used it. And YIKES it is expensive!



  15. #15
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    I gave it to a mare that developed peritonitis. It was given orally, smelled really bad and she certainly did NOT appreciate it. However, it helped, she recovered so it worked.



  16. #16
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    The risk of tendon rupture is not something that should be taken lightly. I've seen at least 15-20 cases in humans of achilles tendon tears or frank rupture linked to the use of quinolones. For a human it's bad enough; for a horse it could be devastating. Antibiotics are not to be taken lightly and used for the heck of it, particularly this class, IMO. Probably a good thing it's pricey or people would be randomly using it (like they do sulfa and penicillin since it's so readily available) for every little case of snots or scratches.
    Click here before you buy.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaintPony View Post
    It also comes in pill form - that is how I have used it. And YIKES it is expensive!
    Pill form for a horse? Not to my knowledge.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    It is given IV so stomach contents isn't an issue.
    Not sure exacly what you meant re: that? If you meant regarding stomach upset, that is not always true. Some medicines irritate the stomach because of their pH. Some medicines like antibiotics can also irritate the stomach becasue they eliminate the natural flora of the stomach and this can cause loose stool/cramping regardless of the route (IV vs oral). Quinolones like Baytril are an example of this because they are so broad acting and will kill much natural GI flora.

    You would avoid the conerning interaction between divalent cations like magnesium and zinc - then that would be true as long as it's not being given IV at the same time (via the same lumen) as another medication that interacts.



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockfordbuckeye View Post
    Not sure exacly what you meant re: that? If you meant regarding stomach upset, that is not always true. Some medicines irritate the stomach because of their pH. Some medicines like antibiotics can also irritate the stomach becasue they eliminate the natural flora of the stomach and this can cause loose stool/cramping regardless of the route (IV vs oral). Quinolones like Baytril are an example of this because they are so broad acting and will kill much natural GI flora.

    You would avoid the conerning interaction between divalent cations like magnesium and zinc - then that would be true as long as it's not being given IV at the same time (via the same lumen) as another medication that interacts.
    Don't think she meant about gastric problems, think she meant Baytril being used on a full or empty stomach.
    The vets were concerned about using the Baytril with my horse with the K Pen because of colitis issues, 2 days after starting Baytril his manure started to get soft and I had vet ASAP and started Bio-sponge, we did 4 days worth which cleared it up for about 10 days then had to do another 2 days worth of Bio-sponge again, the horse has been on Plat Performance Balance for a probiotic since the start along with Longevity.



  20. #20
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    Apr. 6, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    Pill form for a horse? Not to my knowledge.
    Yes - the pills come in a bottle with a purple label. And prescribed by a vet. Not making it up.

    Had to give Baytril to my cat once too when she had an infection that wouldn't clear up. That was fun! And did I mention expensive?



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