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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by jen-s View Post
    Yes, I realize that, but I would expect the pile to be on the ground, not halfway out/suspended. It just seemed...odd. That's why I wondered if it might be prolapse either instead of or in addition to a pile that hasn't dropped.

    I felt rather gauche asking what to me seems an academic question that to someone else might be deemed horribly insensitive, but in light of the criticism of the photographer, I feel a bit less awkward questioning the staging of the scene.

    I wanted to ask the same question Glad you did first
    *^*^*^
    Himmlische Traumpferde
    "Wenn Du denkst es geht nicht mehr, kommt von irgendwo ein kleines Licht daher"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
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    My Grandmother was an Army nurse in France during WWI. She had some pretty horrific photos in her album of piles of dead horses and soldiers.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nootka View Post
    I wanted to ask the same question Glad you did first
    Glad I could take one for the team.
    Flip a coin. It's not what side lands that matters, but what side you were hoping for when the coin was still in the air.

    You call it boxed wine. I call it carboardeaux.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
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    That is how my horse looked after he died, too. The hind-end thing, that is.

    "Yes, I realize that, but I would expect the pile to be on the ground, not halfway out/suspended. It just seemed...odd. That's why I wondered if it might be prolapse either instead of or in addition to a pile that hasn't dropped.

    I felt rather gauche asking what to me seems an academic question that to someone else might be deemed horribly insensitive, but in light of the criticism of the photographer, I feel a bit less awkward questioning the staging of the scene."



  5. #25
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    Knowing he staged scenes one might assume he removed the manure pile, leaving only the prolapsed rectum w/ or w/o any remaining manure inside, who knows exactly what we're seeing.

    It's what happens.



  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    Knowing he staged scenes one might assume he removed the manure pile, leaving only the prolapsed rectum w/ or w/o any remaining manure inside, who knows exactly what we're seeing.

    It's what happens.
    Many historical photos were "staged." Or, if you prefer, "posed." The early photographers often thought as "artists" vice "reporter." So what you see is a version of reality, but it's often highly filtered through the eyes of the photographer.

    IIRC Mathew Brady favored using an almost "story board" approach with a series of photos of a battlefield or event. He was as much an "author" as a "reporter." We might think of him as one of the first "photo journalists."

    This is even more pronounced in photos of individual soldiers. Many re-enactors look for high levels of "authenticity." They study the regulations of their era and then look to photos to see how those rules were put into practice. Often there is quite a "disconnect." The person spending a significant sum to get photographed (and it was not a cheap thing in those days) thought in terms of putting their best foot forward. Civilians dressed in their "Sunday best" and soldiers in their best uniform. If they wanted to present a "martial" appearance they would carry as many weapons as they could reasonably fit in. Sometimes the weapons were owned by the photographer and used as "props."

    Photos of groups of officers (often paid for by the senior officer) are probably a bit more "realistic", particularly if they are "in the field." Studio photos are likely to be more "posed." Photos of groups of enlisted personnel in the field will be even more realistic (i.e., less "posed"). These photos are often quite "spontaneous" and there was little time to "primp" for the picture. This makes them particularly valuable as a historical reference.

    Photos of parades or inspections might be the least realistic in some cases in terms of what people did on a day to day basis. They are very valuable if they are photos of horses, mules, and their use. Lots of folks here complain about their inability to make their horse do something or another. When you see of photo of dozens, or sometimes even hundreds, of horses in formation without signs of ill-behavior it puts a new light on those complaints.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    Knowing he staged scenes one might assume he removed the manure pile, leaving only the prolapsed rectum w/ or w/o any remaining manure inside, who knows exactly what we're seeing.

    It's what happens.
    Many historical photos were "staged." Or, if you prefer, "posed." The early photographers often thought as "artists" vice "reporter." So what you see is a version of reality, but it's often highly filtered through the eyes of the photographer.

    IIRC Mathew Brady favored using an almost "story board" approach with a series of photos of a battlefield or event. He was as much an "author" as a "reporter." We might think of him as one of the first "photo journalists."

    This is even more pronounced in photos of individual soldiers. Many re-enactors look for high levels of "authenticity." They study the regulations of their era and then look to photos to see how those rules were put into practice. Often there is quite a "disconnect." The person spending a significant sum to get photographed (and it was not a cheap thing in those days) thought in terms of putting their best foot forward. Civilians dressed in their "Sunday best" and soldiers in their best uniform. If they wanted to present a "martial" appearance they would carry as many weapons as they could reasonably fit in. Sometimes the weapons were owned by the photographer and used as "props."

    Photos of groups of officers (often paid for by the senior officer) are probably a bit more "realistic", particularly if they are "in the field." Studio photos are likely to be more "posed." Photos of groups of enlisted personnel in the field will be even more realistic (i.e., less "posed"). These photos are often quite "spontaneous" and there was little time to "primp" for the picture. This makes them particularly valuable as a historical reference.

    Photos of parades or inspections might be the least realistic in some cases in terms of what people did on a day to day basis. They are very valuable if they are photos of horses, mules, and their use. Lots of folks here complain about their inability to make their horse do something or another. When you see of photo of dozens, or sometimes even hundreds, of horses in formation without signs of ill-behavior it puts a new light on those complaints.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
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    Sadly that picture is mild. There are far more horrific photos out there of men and horses.

    The Civil War was a classic case of stupidity, as is the present conflict in the Middle East.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


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  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by merrygoround View Post
    Sadly that picture is mild. There are far more horrific photos out there of men and horses.
    For me, the power of this picture comes from it looking almost natural. In some ways it is more horrific than those depicting mutilated carcasses lying in the mud.



  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by fburton View Post
    For me, the power of this picture comes from it looking almost natural. In some ways it is more horrific than those depicting mutilated carcasses lying in the mud.
    it is natural.
    War isn't.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  11. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guilherme View Post
    Many historical photos were "staged." Or, if you prefer, "posed." The early photographers often thought as "artists" vice "reporter." So what you see is a version of reality, but it's often highly filtered through the eyes of the photographer.

    IIRC Mathew Brady favored using an almost "story board" approach with a series of photos of a battlefield or event. He was as much an "author" as a "reporter." We might think of him as one of the first "photo journalists."

    This is even more pronounced in photos of individual soldiers. Many re-enactors look for high levels of "authenticity." They study the regulations of their era and then look to photos to see how those rules were put into practice. Often there is quite a "disconnect." The person spending a significant sum to get photographed (and it was not a cheap thing in those days) thought in terms of putting their best foot forward. Civilians dressed in their "Sunday best" and soldiers in their best uniform. If they wanted to present a "martial" appearance they would carry as many weapons as they could reasonably fit in. Sometimes the weapons were owned by the photographer and used as "props."

    Photos of groups of officers (often paid for by the senior officer) are probably a bit more "realistic", particularly if they are "in the field." Studio photos are likely to be more "posed." Photos of groups of enlisted personnel in the field will be even more realistic (i.e., less "posed"). These photos are often quite "spontaneous" and there was little time to "primp" for the picture. This makes them particularly valuable as a historical reference.

    Photos of parades or inspections might be the least realistic in some cases in terms of what people did on a day to day basis. They are very valuable if they are photos of horses, mules, and their use. Lots of folks here complain about their inability to make their horse do something or another. When you see of photo of dozens, or sometimes even hundreds, of horses in formation without signs of ill-behavior it puts a new light on those complaints.

    G.
    I was just addressing her question about where the poop went



  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    it is natural.
    War isn't.

    War is natural. Fighting is natural. It's ugly, but it's natural.


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  13. #33
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    I really don't think this picture is staged. It looks like someone was getting the tack off of the horse as it was dying. Have you ever tried to move a dead horses legs let alone the whole body? Once rigamortis sets in it is hard to try to pose a body.



  14. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    War is natural. Fighting is natural. It's ugly, but it's natural.
    not bombs being hurled at living flesh tho.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  15. #35
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    I had to look it up because I only knew that rigor mortis is a short term thing, wiki says depending on the temperature up to 72 hours in people, so theoretically the carcass could have been posed once it had decayed enough. It's more likely that it got put up on its brisket by somebody removing the tack, so before rigor set in.
    I've seen an animal that had been hit by car and traveled before expiring from internal bleeding, and it went down in a befuddling, artificial looking manner. Just how it was moving at the time of death and how the legs wound up.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  16. #36
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    We just have to disagree on that, Al, There's not much point in throwing stuff at dead flesh, unless it's a marinade.


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  17. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    well, the north had a constant influx of Irish...so much so they did not need to exchange prisoners with the south to keep their ranks filled.

    (but seriously, while the armies were volunteers, once signed up, they had no say so as to where to go. War is a matter of old men telling young men where to go and die. Truth be told on either side they would rather go out for a beer than kill each other. Naturally this is not true for current conflicts as they are so far off the chart)
    Speaking of the Irish and volunteers... A lot of times, people arriving in America from overseas (mostly from Ireland) would get off the boat, walk down the gangplank, be granted citizenship, and immediately drafted into the Federal army. So these poor guys were literally shipped off to the front lines to fight in a war that they had no stake in, much less understood what the hell was going on.
    "...That's the worst, I think. When the secret stays locked within not for want of a teller, but for want of an understanding ear." --Stephen King



  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by realrush89 View Post
    Speaking of the Irish and volunteers... A lot of times, people arriving in America from overseas (mostly from Ireland) would get off the boat, walk down the gangplank, be granted citizenship, and immediately drafted into the Federal army. So these poor guys were literally shipped off to the front lines to fight in a war that they had no stake in, much less understood what the hell was going on.
    I doubt this ever happened. If you've got a reference I'd be glad to look at it.

    What DID happen (and continued into the early 1880s) was that immigrants would land with no money and be met by recruiting agents that would give them $20 cash if they enlisted. They were then sent to the regiments that paid the agents. During the ACW desertion was a problem but could be handled. During the IW period desertion rates in some regiments were 60%. Some deserters would enlist multiple times (getting multiple bonus payments) and then desert multiple times. Record keeping was pretty bad and as long as you didn't run into anybody who knew you it was OK!

    Yes, Katherine, I did run on. But why write a short story when you can write a novel?!?!?!?

    "The Civil War was a classic case of stupidity, as is the present conflict in the Middle East."

    I guess the writer of this thought would agree with the Copperhead Democrats that we'd have been better off the let the Secessionist states go. And we're better off if we just allow the extremists to impose their violent vision upon all who won't accept it peacefully. I hope they've already purchased their hajib.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


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  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Guilherme View Post

    Yes, Katherine, I did run on. But why write a short story when you can write a novel?!?!?!?

    "The Civil War was a classic case of stupidity, as is the present conflict in the Middle East."

    I guess the writer of this thought would agree with the Copperhead Democrats that we'd have been better off the let the Secessionist states go. And we're better off if we just allow the extremists to impose their violent vision upon all who won't accept it peacefully. I hope they've already purchased their hajib.

    G.
    Well said, and I appreciate the accurate historical narratives, greater length adds greater detail on a subject I am not well versed in.



  20. #40
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    I work in academia so I am used to the intellectual exercise of dissecting an image. So have it, those of you of that bent at the moment.

    However, I look at any of these images, of the dead horse(s) and people and I just feel great loss and waste. Could be the song I am listening to at the moment, but just great loss. And gratitude for my own life and the lives of all things. I just feel an overwhelming sense of the great gift of it all and sorrow for the abuse of it.

    Chastened for those times I am not as grateful as I should be, I'm going riding.


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