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  1. #1
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    Question Marketing to hunters or no?

    Ok so trying not to make this a sales ad or close to it, so I am broadening the question out to all folks in this boat.

    Say you have a horse that jumps very neat and tight. IS easy etc. But you don't feel that his trot will make him an uber competitive hunter. But his jump absolutely would. What do you do?

    Do you market to just everyone and let the buyers decide, or talk about it upfront with all potential buyers?

    Now we're not talking a horrid trot.... just not as daisy clipper like as say what a WB could produce.


    Any and all advice is welcomed.

    Emily
    "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries



  2. #2
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    There are definitely hunters out there that do well that aren't 10 movers. There is only one hack class in a division so if he's awesome over fences I would market him as such.



  3. #3
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  4. #4
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    Default

    Also, if he is super easy and a confidence builder, he may be suitable to advertise as a packer for a kid learning that doesn't necessarily need to be win the hack/be division champ, but wants a safe honest trip over fences.


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  5. #5
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    Equally important to the jump is the ability to get the stride without getting quick or strung out.



  6. #6
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    Does he go around like a hunter over fences? There's more to the class than the freeze frame of what he looks like in the air. If he goes like a hunter, there's a buyer who's not that hung up on winning the hack.
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/


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  7. #7
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    There is far more than A show hunters. Most of the "hunter" world does "C's" and locals. At those levels, especially at the 3' manners and appearance of being easy to ride often outweigh the fancy mover in all but the hack. This summer I rode a former big jumper with action like a sewing machine in his first show in years. We went in a bitty hunter division and cleaned up because we found 8 nice spots, it's jump is nice and he gives the appearance of a super pleasant ride. We were 3rd of 8 or 9 in the hack, again because he gives a pleasant to ride vibe, not because of his action.

    As far as marketing, the wider the net the better. If you find hunters not interested you can re-focus. If the horse is fairly green, it will be up to the eventual buyer to "finish" him to their taste. I think that many sellers miss out on possible buyers because they pidgeon-hole the horse as "hunter" or "eventer." Sure, once you are at the higher levels it takes specialization, but at lower levels horses can cross over fairly easily. (OP, your boy Lad, the eventer could probably win in the 3' hunters in my local area, for example.)

    In the ad, mention what he has done (shows, X-country school, water, etc) and what he's working on (if green) and let the potential buyer decide if it's a skillset that they want. A friend of mine was looking for a show hunter a few years back. She fell in love with a young TB started in eventing and now does him in the jumpers and field hunts him. She followed him toward his best area and has never regretted not getting a "show hunter."
    F O.B
    Resident racing historian ~~~ Re-riders Clique
    Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique



  8. #8
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    Default Marketing to hunters or no?

    If this is the horse I am thinking of.....I would say that if he is brave enough he could go towards the derbies or even an equitation/medal horse.
    FutureWin Farm
    "You are never given a dream without also being given the power to make it true."


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  9. #9
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    Oct. 7, 2005
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    My D's junior hunter was not the hack winner, but always placed very high over fences and was a wonderful derby horse.



  10. #10
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    My jumper turned hunter was a good mover, but not a hack winner. We won many championships placing 4th and 5th in the hack at the AA's in the AO's. If the horse has a nice enough jump they can still win.
    **Friend of bar.ka**

    Fils Du Reverdy (Revy)- 1993 Selle Francais Gelding
    My equine soulmate



  11. #11
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    It would be a lot easier to judge if I knew the horse in question or had a video to see. There's a lot more to a good hunter than a good trot and nice jump in a photograph.


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  12. #12
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    Sorry hunterrider. It would be advertising if I showed pics or videos.

    Emily
    "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries



  13. #13
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    One of my A/O hunters did not go in the hack unless there were only two in the ring = bad mover.
    He qualified for Devon in only three and one half months. He also was the only A/O horse called back one year at Lake Placid in the Junior/Amateur Hunter Classic.
    Yes a good mover is a real plus, but there are four over fences.
    http://STA551.com
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by STA View Post
    Yes a good mover is a real plus, but there are four over fences.
    Exactly. Don't even mention movement in the ads. Focus on his jump and his stride. There's a LOT of horses that walk in the ring and pick up the canter right away to disguise that ugly trot.

    When people call, answer honestly if they ask if he's a good mover, and by that I mean tell them he has a good canter, but not a spectacular trot. You don't have to say, "Jesus, this horse could stomp grapes for a living!"

    Honestly, and I mean this with absolutely no disrespect intended, but given that you are primarily an eventer, it's unlikely that a real top flight A trainer is going to come look at him, if only because those deals are either made at the shows or in Europe. The person who is likely to come see him is probably someone who wants a slightly more multi-purpose horse and is more than willing to sacrifice the trot for a terrific jump, especially if the horse has a mind as well.

    Good luck! He sounds right up my alley, but I'm all full at the inn!
    Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.


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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sing Mia Song View Post

    Honestly, and I mean this with absolutely no disrespect intended, but given that you are primarily an eventer, it's unlikely that a real top flight A trainer is going to come look at him, if only because those deals are either made at the shows or in Europe. The person who is likely to come see him is probably someone who wants a slightly more multi-purpose horse and is more than willing to sacrifice the trot for a terrific jump, especially if the horse has a mind as well.
    See this is the problem with having an "established" online presence with a username that denotes I event. I haven't evented since 2007. Yes I still go watch and train students who event, but I have been happily focusing on jumpers for a while now. I am MUCH better at it, am happier to be doing something that I succeed at and lets face it, the enjoyment from jumping a nice big oxer far outweighs the excitement of doing a correct half pass. (For me anyway)

    It's still a little tough being a pro with a nice 3'6" horse. That level seems almost reserved for children and adults, so I end up falling back to TB only shows or whatever else has an open class. But all in all I am having the time of my life and my ribbon collection is increasing by leaps and bounds at a time when I thought I'd be getting tired of competing and early show mornings.

    For a slight correction, I do have VERY good contacts and the one for sale may not make it to the online sales sites. I have had steady interest already and am hoping that my most favorite non local h/j trainer will adore him when she meets him Friday and take him back with her to spoil forever. Dream I know... but hey we all want the best for our guys. Worst case any of her students could take him and I know he'd be in great hands.

    I do agree that folks may want a multi disciplined horse, but thats what I want from my own. I don't want to have to have 5 different horses if I want to do a xc schooling, go fox hunting, go do jumpers, teach a lesson or just hack out with a friend on the trails. I can afford one horse to enjoy my life, and for what I invest in board, shoes, vet, treats, tack, blankets and so on... why not have one horse that allows me to enjoy the flexibility to do whatever?

    ~Emily
    "Courage is not the absence of fear but rather the judgment that something is more important than fear. The brave may not live forever but the cautious do not live at all." ~2001 The Princess Diaries



  16. #16
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    Honestly, and I mean this with absolutely no disrespect intended, but given that you are primarily an eventer, it's unlikely that a real top flight A trainer is going to come look at him, if only because those deals are either made at the shows or in Europe. The person who is likely to come see him is probably someone who wants a slightly more multi-purpose horse and is more than willing to sacrifice the trot for a terrific jump, especially if the horse has a mind as well.
    Meh. I don't 100% agree with this sentiment. I DO think you have to a decent horse, understand the discipline, and have decent contacts, but just because someone is an event rider does not mean they can't get good interest in a nice horse into another discipline. I had several good hunter/eq trainers out to try my prelim event horse when I was selling him. He ultimately did not sell as a hunter, but more because he was far more readily marketable as a eventing schoolmaster and I did not have the time or money to get the show mileage people wanted to REALLY consider him.

    My point is, a quality horse in the hands of someone like Em CAN be marketable as a hunter (if the ingredients are there). My horse was an established eventer in a eventing specific barn with a well known eventing trainer...and those good trainers knew we had good horses and that we knew our stuff and agreed that the horse had potential. So, Em shouldn't be put off even if she WAS still eventing. She's been around and has good connections.

    Em, get him to the hunter ring and see what he's made of. Can't hurt and if he's got the stuff, it will make his potential market that much broader.



  17. #17
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    The opposite thing bugs me...when a seller says "Hunter" and the horse has little or no experience to back that up and no show results.

    IMO the best marketing strategy is just say it's schooling over XX height in good form and several avenues may be open to it depending on buyer preference. Cast the wider net following the analogy in the earler post. Getting them out to see him is the most important step.

    I would go ahead and say he is not going to be the hack winner if anybody asks. No need to explain that further. Not that big a deal when reflected in the price.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by findeight View Post
    The opposite thing bugs me...when a seller says "Hunter" and the horse has little or no experience to back that up and no show results.

    IMO the best marketing strategy is just say it's schooling over XX height in good form and several avenues may be open to it depending on buyer preference. Cast the wider net following the analogy in the earler post. Getting them out to see him is the most important step.
    I agree with findeight. I'd rather a seller indicate that a horse may be able to do something...and then let me decide with videos and pictures...rather than say they are something...when the horse has never done it. (and the owner may not even know what that discipline entails).

    For example: We had one person in our barn trying to sell her daughter's horse as a hunter. The horse was tense, moved like a sewing machine and I never saw it do a complete course without running off. When I asked why they were selling her as a hunter, they said that was the type of jumps she jumped. Even that wasn't accurate as the jumps in our ring have striped poles and are closer to jumper ring jumps. Interestingly, I believe the horse was sent away b/c the people couldn't sell it. No wonder.



    Quote Originally Posted by yellowbritches View Post
    He ultimately did not sell as a hunter, but more because he was far more readily marketable as a eventing schoolmaster and I did not have the time or money to get the show mileage people wanted to REALLY consider him.

    Em, get him to the hunter ring and see what he's made of. Can't hurt and if he's got the stuff, it will make his potential market that much broader.
    Sure an eventer can sell into the hunter market...but as you indicate above, it takes work. You've got to make the horse desirable to the hunter market...if you can do that, and have the right connections, it shouldn't be an issue with a nice, honestly represented horse. Don't use XC pictures or ones of you schooling in your XC vest over stadium (I'm not the only one that thinks "must be a handful" if that person feels the need to school in the ring with a vest). Take the time to go to a hunter show with a good photographer. Get video of the horse doing a hunter course in a nice manner, complete with changes. That's how you get the right market to look.

    When I sold my horse into the dressage world, I went the whole nine yards. I did a photo shoot with him in dressage tack, I had a pro do a sample test on him. I had video with a dressage ammie riding him when it became apparent that putting my hunter-self in a dressage saddle was not going to give the impression I wanted. I was lucky in that the horse sold in three weeks, but part of it was that I put a lot of effort into making the horse look the part.

    An eventer (or former eventer turned jumper) CAN market to the hunters...just do the homework and don't expect people to look past the trappings of your current discipline. If you want to market to the hunters, show the horse as a hunter.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"


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  19. #19
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    I don't know what it takes to be a good hunter, but I think it's completely analogous when h/j folks sell "event prospects".

    Some truly understand the sport, identify the horse as a legitimate prospect for the discipline, and present the horse doing what we eventers need to see to evaluate it.

    Others market anything that is hot or has scary jumping form as a "great event prospect" because they know how eventers love crazy and unsafe. :-)

    I would imagine that an eventer/jumper marketing a hunter could be similarly informed or ignorant.


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  20. #20
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    Beam Me Up, I tried to thumbs up your post but accidentally hit the thumbs down. Sorry! Last tome I try to hit one of those little guys accurately on my phone.



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