The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 34 of 34
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,222

    Default

    Resistance to Roundup is a big enough problem they are going to be adding 2,4-D in increasing amounts to kill weeds. You don't get to this situation in this relatively short timeframe with normal use of a herbicide.

    Talking to "farmers around here" doesn't extrapolate to the rest of the country or the world.

    http://www.science20.com/news_articl...estimate-94753
    A new study says that the use of herbicides in the production of three genetically modified herbicide-tolerant crops, cotton, soybeans and corn, has gone up rather than down. The counterintuitive estimate is based on an analysis of publicly available data from the U.S. Department of Agriculture's National Agriculture Statistics Service.


    USDA's own numbers say herbicide use is up
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    38,478

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Resistance to Roundup is a big enough problem they are going to be adding 2,4-D in increasing amounts to kill weeds. You don't get to this situation in this relatively short timeframe with normal use of a herbicide.

    Talking to "farmers around here" doesn't extrapolate to the rest of the country or the world.

    http://www.science20.com/news_articl...estimate-94753


    USDA's own numbers say herbicide use is up[/COLOR]
    Use is up for many reasons, some transient.
    With GMOs, use is halved where those are used.
    They just had a story on this in our local news last evening, with local farmers again saying how those crops have helped produce better all around crops, including considerably less chemical inputs.

    Here is one story on GMOs, right below the one you linked to there, explaining more what GMOs are and are not:

    http://www.science20.com/michael_eis..._not_scare_you



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,222

    Default

    "use is halved where those are used" doesn't at all take into account the ever-increasing number of acres on which GMO crops are used.

    Are you saying the USDA's own numbers are wrong?

    I do understand what GMO means
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    38,478

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    "use is halved where those are used" doesn't at all take into account the ever-increasing number of acres on which GMO crops are used.

    Are you saying the USDA's own numbers are wrong?

    I do understand what GMO means
    I say that because there are more chemicals used, that doesn't mean that is happening only on GMO crops.
    Not so, according to those that are using GMO crops.
    Not saying it may not happen here or there, but that one link was extrapolating that this or that may happen with little data for that.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2003
    Location
    MI USA
    Posts
    6,954

    Default

    To use more honey in the home, you can substitute it for sugar in recipes. I do this and can't tell any differences in taste. I am trying to use more honey so this substitution plan works out pretty well, instead of just using honey on "special" stuff where only honey will work.

    Here is a site with some suggestions about the honey substituting.

    http://www.cooks.com/rec/view/0,1923...243192,00.html

    Loss of bees for pollination would be a huge blow to the food producers, whether they are honey bees or other kinds of bees. The bees work tirelessly and cost nothing in wages! They are entertaining to watch, certainly make the plants produce better. Some plants would have no fruit or edible parts, without being bee pollinated.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    In Trouble with Dad...
    Posts
    29,920

    Default

    Regardless.

    I really did not post this to start another GMO war.

    I was more aiming at the idea that we need to think our actions through a hole lot more than we tend to.
    Aside from the possible fallout from changing our plants too quickly (or anything else for that matter)

    However, as in many situations there is probably more than one reason, possibly benign in itself, but compounded leading to disaster.

    What Bluey is trying to express time and time again (and I do agree with her, even though I am a flower child/Hippie at heart and pretty much anti poison) we are using as a whole a lot less pesticide than we used to in the 60s and 70s.
    In part because we have made progress in the techniques used that eliminate a lot of problems, part because the industry has supplied us with better, more pin pointed sprays to use. Many not even toxic to the non target organism.

    Also, please do note: Just because something is labeled 'Organic' does not mean AT ALL that it is harmless.
    Some of the remedies are highly toxic, especially in compounded doses.

    The point of the OP, with a twinkle in the eyes:
    if you eat primarily/exclusively plant derived foods, you ought to consider that bees do the work, and the people who tend to them can use the incentive honey sales provide to keep the hives or get more.
    (I am sure the hard core AR/Vegan people would love to see the hives set free, since the poor bees are enslaved.)

    Same as you might as well enjoy the warms and comfort of wool, since the animal is better off without it come spring.
    Not to mention that in the small niche of the North German countryside, sheep are used to maintain the levees and dykes along the coastline: they keep the grass short, and with their hooves they agitate the roots to form a stronger base while closing up the holes small burrowing animals leave.
    And that since the early 1960s, after a devastating storm surge broke the dykes in 61 places.

    oh, and BTW, bees don't usually frequent grains.
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2012
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    506

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    (I am sure the hard core AR/Vegan people would love to see the hives set free, since the poor bees are enslaved.)

    oh, and BTW, bees don't usually frequent grains.
    I just wanted to add that the bees regularly set themselves free to the despair of their loving keepers. It's called swarming. If a bee wants to go, a bee goes.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    In Trouble with Dad...
    Posts
    29,920

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Crackerdog View Post
    I just wanted to add that the bees regularly set themselves free to the despair of their loving keepers. It's called swarming. If a bee wants to go, a bee goes.
    But when the keeper has a hive ready, they might just move next door!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2012
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    506

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    But when the keeper has a hive ready, they might just move next door!
    Ooo...that's diabolical!! Free the bees! Free the bees!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    15,867

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    Not to mention that in the small niche of the North German countryside, sheep are used to maintain the levees and dykes along the coastline: they keep the grass short, and with their hooves they agitate the roots to form a stronger base while closing up the holes small burrowing animals leave.
    And that since the early 1960s, after a devastating storm surge broke the dykes in 61 places.
    In the same vein, this piece of road grading equipment is called a sheepsfoot roller. You know why? Because it compacts the dirt in much the same was as driving a herd of sheep through town does. When the roads would get a little too loose, the local shepherd would bring his flock in to tamp everything back down. Now we have Caterpillar equipment that does the same thing, but the heritage of the equipment is obvious in it's name.

    I've always thought that was interesting


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
    Location
    In Trouble with Dad...
    Posts
    29,920

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    In the same vein, this piece of road grading equipment is called a sheepsfoot roller. You know why? Because it compacts the dirt in much the same was as driving a herd of sheep through town does. When the roads would get a little too loose, the local shepherd would bring his flock in to tamp everything back down. Now we have Caterpillar equipment that does the same thing, but the heritage of the equipment is obvious in it's name.

    I've always thought that was interesting
    cute!

    (but I think it would not work well on a dyke...thus the sheep)
    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2001
    Location
    Center of the Universe
    Posts
    6,901

    Default

    actually, they are currently thinking the honeybee deaths are caused by a virus. Read all about it instead of listening to weird anti-GMO rhetoric.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2786540/

    http://www.landesbioscience.com/jour...LENCE0067R.pdf


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
    Posts
    35,222

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    In the same vein, this piece of road grading equipment is called a sheepsfoot roller. You know why? Because it compacts the dirt in much the same was as driving a herd of sheep through town does. When the roads would get a little too loose, the local shepherd would bring his flock in to tamp everything back down. Now we have Caterpillar equipment that does the same thing, but the heritage of the equipment is obvious in it's name.

    I've always thought that was interesting
    I see those all over new construction sites and always wondered what their purpose was. I get it now!

    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    actually, they are currently thinking the honeybee deaths are caused by a virus. Read all about it instead of listening to weird anti-GMO rhetoric.

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2786540/

    http://www.landesbioscience.com/jour...LENCE0067R.pdf
    Yes, that's been the implication other anti-GMO articles/studies as well, but the question is WHY is this happening? There IS some evidence that it's because of GMO-related issues, as stated in one of the articles I listed.

    Sure, viruses kill every day. But when you find colonies with multiple viruses, something that doesn't normally happen, you start to wonder what's causing *that*
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    2,226

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Alagirl View Post
    but I do recall having heard that renting the hives to orchards, etc is almost better business than the honey.
    That's what I recall from my beekeeping and certification class.
    If I knew what I were doing, why would I take lessons?

    "Things should be as simple as possible,
    but no simpler." - Einstein



Similar Threads

  1. Honey Boo Boo endorses Obama
    By Noms in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Nov. 3, 2012, 12:19 PM
  2. Who else hates the Honey Boo Boo show?
    By jetsmom in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 60
    Last Post: Oct. 31, 2012, 10:50 PM
  3. Honey Run Team Challenge
    By xcatheart in forum Eventing
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Oct. 4, 2011, 06:29 PM
  4. Honey i'm Home!!
    By Cartfall in forum Driving
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: Jul. 27, 2009, 06:17 PM
  5. how to get rid of honey bees in barn
    By Rebmik in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: Feb. 23, 2009, 07:29 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness