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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Fort Collins, CO
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    16,261

    Default Cribber out in the field--collar?

    I (accidentally, sort of) bought a cribber this summer. Sigh.

    She was doing just fine in the field, but since we're now solidly into winter and the grass is dead, she's going to town on the fence posts and inside her shed. It's probably time to put a collar on her.

    I tried the miracle collar on her, briefly, and it did nothing. If anything, it made her more determined.

    What is best for a field boarded horse? She lives with one other horse (who also belongs to me) on about 4 acres. The Dare collar? A simple strap? The nutcracker?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 29, 2002
    Posts
    735

    Default

    I personally wouldn't bother. I have one and if he wants to crib...he cribs. Collar or no collar. I found that it is more trouble than it's worth and it caused issues (and vet bills) worse than the actually cribbing does.
    ~Run and Jump!~



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 18, 2006
    Location
    The back woods of FLA.
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    161

    Default

    I also had no luck with a miracle collar on a boarder's horse. Put a french collar on(wider) and did cut down substantiality but not all together. If possible can you feed extra hay out in the field or space out hay feedings more frequently that can help. I also smeared Hooflex on the areas that he wanted to crib on and that helped as well(the ointment kind). Try also adding aloe juice in his grain just in case there is some gastric issues which is usually the case with most cribbers(most scope positive for ulcers)

    I disagree with previous poster on just letting them crib- besides the damage they can do to fence you could end up with gas colics from the wind they suck in as well as the damage they do to their teeth.

    Is a hot wire possible for his field? That will at least help keep them off the fence posts.

    Good luck it is annoying as he** dealing with them-not necessarily a deal breaker for me but not my favorite vice.
    "When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro."-Hunter S. Thompson



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Middleburg, VA
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    12,803

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    I have gotten to the point where I no long collar cribbers. Rarely do they work, or you have to practically strangle them to get them to work. And when they do work, the horse usually gets agitated and cranky because they can't crib (think of it like tying a smoker's hands behind their back so they can't smoke...you will not have a happy camper on your hands! ). They also tend to make horses sore around the poll (especially when you crank them on).

    So, I just ignore it. I'll provide more hay (a hay net in the stall often curbs the cribbing some, but I don't know if that it would in the field). If they are being destructive on the fence and I have the capability, I'll hot wire the fence to keep them from pulling rails off. Most seem to get worse if they are bored (duh, I know) and need more work, so being sure they are getting out and doing something often can reduce it, as well. And making sure the gut is in good working order (and treating it if it isn't) can help, too.

    I've had quite a few aggressive cribbers in my barn, including one right now (smart boy doesn't crib on the fence rails, and instead latches on to a fence post!), and, other than teeth and occasionally weight management (some cribbers rather crib than eat), I've never had a health issue caused by cribbing. The horses' vets have never stressed concern for their health.

    If you are absolutely are set on a collar, you may have to have a couple of varieties and rotate through them. That's what we did with the last one I collared. One would work for awhile, then he'd figure out how to get around it, and we'd have to switch.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    Default

    One of the latest studies on cribbers seemed to indicate that collars were worse than cribbing.

    Maybe someone can find that study, less than a year old, that was reported in The Horse magazine, best I remember?
    I gotta go.

    Cribbers may not be very important where you are not there all the time, but if your horses live like mine, right by the house, any such, cribbing, weaving, fence walking, can drive you nuts.
    I avoid them, for MY peace of mind.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2009
    Location
    Maine
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    858

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    Don't know that article that Bluey mentioned, but I'm amazed at how long it is taking for the latest scientific information about cribbing to truly disseminate. Several years ago studies confirmed that horses are not "swallowing air" when they crib. There are theories that rather than the cribbing causing colic, some underlying problem might cause both. I know several cribbers who lived to a ripe old age with no colic issues.

    My cribber lives out without a collar. He cribs mostly after he eats his (minimal amount of) grain that he gets mixed in with his hay stretcher pellets. To date he has had no health issues. My last horse was also a cribber, and cribbed much more than this guy. We did try collars with him, and they had to be so tight I worried; plus they rubbed him terribly. His current owner uses a muzzle when he has to be in a dry lot (winter/mud season).



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
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    Pen Argyl PA
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    I have a cribber and i use hotwire. I asked the BO if i could supply it, and the solar charger. i have put it in two rows above the top board, the top row is on the posts.

    The shed is also an issue, so i have stapled 1/2inch metal mesh to the edges where he can crib. the sharp edges from the mesh keep his mouth off it. every now and again, i need to repair it. But for the most part, this works. We have another cribber in our pasture as well.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 30, 2006
    Location
    Middle Tennessee
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    My mare also cribs more in the winter when there's no grass and the horses are standing by the fence eating hay. If you can, I vote no strap. I've never found a cribbing strap that works without being tightened to the point of causing more harm than helpfulness. If you can, try to find a way to deter the cribbing-- throw extra hay away from the fence, electrifying fences, etc.

    Because I'm currently at a barn where they request that my mare wears a collar, she has one of these:

    http://www.bigdweb.com/LEATHER-CRIBB...fo/05-30-1255/

    I'll admit it only slightly deters her from cribbing at very best, but I feel it's relatively safe for turnout and doesn't irritate her.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Fort Collins, CO
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    Okay folks--agreement is rare here, so I'll listen!

    The field IS all hot wire. She's cribbing on the top of the fence posts and on the wood lip inside the shed. She also has free choice hay. Nezzy, I'll look into amending the lip in the shed, and perhaps I could do something similar with metal caps for her favorite posts...

    I had a cribber in the past and mostly left him without a collar (unless the barn required it--this miracle collar was pretty effective for him) and he did fine. I've just been worried about Dove's teeth.

    Her trainer at the track recommended the barclay collar, and I suspect that the reason I never saw her crib at the track was due to wearing that particular collar at some point. I never saw her wear anything, and I never saw her crib there. But I don't want to leave something with batteries on a horse who lives outside.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2007
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    Landrum, SC
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    Simkie - the info on the Barclay collar says no batteries are required.
    Athletic Horses. Educated Riders.
    www.Ride-With-Confidence.com



  11. #11
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    Apr. 14, 2006
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    Well, I guess I'm in the minority, but I will NOT tolerate a cribber!! Nov. 2011 I bought a known cribber who had a body score of about a #2 - cribbing related, but not responsible for the weight issue. The first day he arrived I put an old stirrup strap on him and promptly ordered a Weaver brand wide leather strap for him. This horse was so possessed with cribbing that when you put the bit in his mouth he cribbed on it!! From the day I put the new strap on him he has NEVER cribbed and now with the strap off for grooming or tacking up, he has completely forgotten about cribbing...I don't fool myself that he has given up the vice...he is just more busy eating and enjoying life to need a "fix" provided by the cribbing. And did I mention...he has gained 300 pounds in the past 12 months. JM2C !!
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  12. #12
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    Apr. 14, 2007
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    Pen Argyl PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    Okay folks--agreement is rare here, so I'll listen!

    The field IS all hot wire. She's cribbing on the top of the fence posts and on the wood lip inside the shed. She also has free choice hay. Nezzy, I'll look into amending the lip in the shed, and perhaps I could do something similar with metal caps for her favorite posts...

    I had a cribber in the past and mostly left him without a collar (unless the barn required it--this miracle collar was pretty effective for him) and he did fine. I've just been worried about Dove's teeth.

    Her trainer at the track recommended the barclay collar, and I suspect that the reason I never saw her crib at the track was due to wearing that particular collar at some point. I never saw her wear anything, and I never saw her crib there. But I don't want to leave something with batteries on a horse who lives outside.
    i actually put the insulating things on the post itself and close to the edge- as close as would not damage the post. The hotwire is arranged so my guy cannot grab the posts. I know this is very frustrating..I don't want my guy cribbing, but he is not a die-hard cribber, as some are.



  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by crosscreeksh View Post
    Well, I guess I'm in the minority, but I will NOT tolerate a cribber!! Nov. 2011 I bought a known cribber who had a body score of about a #2 - cribbing related, but not responsible for the weight issue. The first day he arrived I put an old stirrup strap on him and promptly ordered a Weaver brand wide leather strap for him. This horse was so possessed with cribbing that when you put the bit in his mouth he cribbed on it!! From the day I put the new strap on him he has NEVER cribbed and now with the strap off for grooming or tacking up, he has completely forgotten about cribbing...I don't fool myself that he has given up the vice...he is just more busy eating and enjoying life to need a "fix" provided by the cribbing. And did I mention...he has gained 300 pounds in the past 12 months. JM2C !!
    i never said i tolerate it. I outsmart it b/c i hate cribbing straps.



  14. #14
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    I didn't read all the posts above, but I did read your original post when you first bought her. I noticed that back then, she had a raging case of gastric ulcers.

    If this mare was fine all summer, but now that winter is here and she's decided to start cribbing, I would highly suspect tummy troubles.

    My mare ONLY goes near wood with her teeth when she's got gastric ulcers starting up again, and there DOES seem to be a correlation between cribbing and ulcers.

    Just a thought.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  15. #15
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    The horses that crib just after eating a grain meal would also be on my list of suspected ulcer cases.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  16. #16
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    6,452

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    I didn't read all the posts above, but I did read your original post when you first bought her. I noticed that back then, she had a raging case of gastric ulcers.

    If this mare was fine all summer, but now that winter is here and she's decided to start cribbing, I would highly suspect tummy troubles.
    ^This

    Scope if possible, so you know exactly what's going on - unfortunately without a scope follow-up post treatment, there's no way to know that she's actually ulcer free vs continuing to have low grade ulcers.

    There is a ton of research out there regarding cribbing - alot to wade through



  17. #17
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    Aug. 2, 2001
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    Ft Worth, TX, USA
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    I am with the majority in that I'd rather not leave my cribber's collar on, HOWEVER, he cribs on his feeder. No big deal until the day he took a bite of grain, grabbed the feeder to crib and ended up choking. Since then I've left his collar (Miracle) on 24/7. I would feed him in a rubber tub on the ground, but he always turns it over and then he's eating grain out of the sand. Any other suggestions?
    "Everyone will start to cheer, when you put on your sailin shoes"-Lowell George

    What's the status on Tuco?



  18. #18
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Toadie's mom View Post
    I am with the majority in that I'd rather not leave my cribber's collar on, HOWEVER, he cribs on his feeder. No big deal until the day he took a bite of grain, grabbed the feeder to crib and ended up choking. Since then I've left his collar (Miracle) on 24/7. I would feed him in a rubber tub on the ground, but he always turns it over and then he's eating grain out of the sand. Any other suggestions?
    Can you put the rubber bucket on the ground on a rubber mat?
    This way he will spill it on the mat and not on the sand.
    You could even bolt the rubber bucket to a larger piece of rubber mat and so he won't be able to spill it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
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    Aug. 2, 2001
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    Ft Worth, TX, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Can you put the rubber bucket on the ground on a rubber mat?
    This way he will spill it on the mat and not on the sand.
    You could even bolt the rubber bucket to a larger piece of rubber mat and so he won't be able to spill it.
    I do have mats on the ground under his feeder, but the sand is so deep they move, and get covered in it quickly. Fastening the tub to the mat sounds like a good idea though.
    "Everyone will start to cheer, when you put on your sailin shoes"-Lowell George

    What's the status on Tuco?



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 1999
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    I have stopped all cribbers using a French collar - metal throat removed, and leather trimmed to be able to be tightened more than the width allows. I don't know why they make them only for draft horse necks.

    If you truly stop them, they quit trying because they KNOW they C A N T. They are not grumpy or miserable. They also don't get sores because they quit trying.

    Horses allowed to crib can and do colic. If you let them crib. you are just playing Russian Roulette. You may get lucky for years. or not.

    They are only super tight when they have their heads up. 99% of the time, they are fairly loose.



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