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  1. #41
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    The Germans are extremely precise, so if they are going to do something incorrectly, they will do it with great precision .


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  2. #42
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    One thing I believe NO contributed was the knowledge that you can teach a young horse piaffe early on to give it a sense of balance (as opposed to riding training level for 200 years and crashing out at 4th level). He was not afraid to advance. His focus was on collected movements albeit, but I think way too many people have superbly trained training level mounts and never dare do the unthinkable...collect your horse. Without proper collection, there is no true extension...only lengthening.


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  3. #43
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    I think that we should train for both
    Some days easier said than done :-/
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble


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  4. #44
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    LOL. When I said precise, I really meant that they always are strict about performing a movement on the dime of the letter so to speak. A transition at A is exactly at A...they get a lot of points for that stuff...even when the transition itself is...whatever.


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  5. #45
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    I agree about training for both which is why I loved this description of the "ideal" sort of horse from the Henriquet article

    "The flexibility of a contortionist, the voltage of an athlete, epidermal sensitivity of a Stradivarius, the total absence of fear, a franchise to accommodate the most unusual of environmental circumstances, great nobility, and the unstoppable ability to learn and understand."


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  6. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by fairtheewell View Post
    LOL. When I said precise, I really meant that they always are strict about performing a movement on the dime of the letter so to speak. A transition at A is exactly at A...they get a lot of points for that stuff...even when the transition itself is...whatever.
    I think this is an important concept, and one of the big differences between what's conveniently referred to as "classical" and what's conveniently referred to as "competitive" - without the French and German designators.

    I am more focused on the quality of the transition itself, than the precision of where it occurs. I am looking for a certain feeling, which is nearly impossible for someone else to see. If it takes a couple steps beyond A for us to really be ready, that's OK with me.

    Of course I can get her to do a reasonable facsimile of a good transition precisely at A. But I'm not willing to jam her - even a little - to do it. In other words, what I feel is more important to me than what you see.


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  7. #47
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    The horse of NO is clearly properly flexed laterally (at the atlas/axis), and the bending is occuring throughout the body. And it is NOT truncated (in the neck only...as we would see in backwards actions of the hand for rk). And his reverse pirouettes really got the horse upright/active with clear adductor use. But today few people use lateral work on a curved line/circles, only on the straight. ALthrough I might disagree with some of the details, I find the work thought out (through exercises per de la Guerinere).

    "I am more focused on the quality of the transition itself, than the precision of where it occurs. I am looking for a certain feeling, which is nearly impossible for someone else to see. If it takes a couple steps beyond A for us to really be ready, that's OK with me. " And that is the difference of riders like NO who never had to show (only produce useful horses for the bull ring and later for competitive riders), he would solve problems with having to worry about exactness. And in the end his horses were easier to ride/lighter in the hand. And for what it is worth (in Germany) the greener horses are ridden in tests w/o letters, saying only middle of short side or long side for such things as transitions.
    I.D.E.A. yoda


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  8. #48
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    Yes!!



  9. #49
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    I,too, find the NO bending exercises, especially on curved lines and circles, useful for suppling a horse, but, unless a chandelier falls on my head - doubtful, considering my life style- I don't see them as an end in themselves.


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  10. #50
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    Of course they are NOT an end in themselves, they are part of suppling/collecting (no chandelier needed...LOL)
    I.D.E.A. yoda



  11. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by ideayoda View Post
    Of course they are NOT an end in themselves, they are part of suppling/collecting (no chandelier needed...LOL)
    Which brings some of us back to wanting to see videos of the horses trained in this school.



  12. #52
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    srs/pk/schultheis/etc
    I.D.E.A. yoda



  13. #53
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    Just throwing this out there: http://youtu.be/wPUNsC5RNmA

    Im not fit to judge really what is being shown--only wanted to say I like watching this horses ears--he is not entirely with her and seems explosive and they do make mistakes--but those ears!
    Last edited by goodpony; Nov. 18, 2012 at 03:05 PM.


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  14. #54
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    I wish she would've quit haulin' on his mouth! LOL


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  15. #55
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    How about these: traditional (a german with what is now considered french methods): http://www.anja-beran.com/videos.html
    I.D.E.A. yoda


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  16. #56
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    again--I can't help but notice the softness of the expression and the attentiveness of the ears on the rider/handler.



  17. #57
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    i would like to see the bridle-less horse working with a bridle... and i wonder why she chose to use a rope halter with no ability to affect the horse laterally in the jaw.

    as for Anja - not my cup of tea.



  18. #58
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    Classical Dressage Vol. 1: School of Aids, Philippe Karl, DVD Horse

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8OgBfZhzm18



  19. #59
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    What I really like about this video is the relaxed working position of the horse. He is not chomping on the bit or swishing his tail, AND he has the "floppy ears" that indicate a clear giving over to the rider.

    Dr. Reiner Klimke mit Ahlerich, DVD Dressurausbildung, Dressage Training

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fBq5r...feature=relmfu
    Last edited by BaroquePony; Nov. 18, 2012 at 07:44 PM.



  20. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by ideayoda View Post
    How about these: traditional (a german with what is now considered french methods): http://www.anja-beran.com/videos.html
    Thank you for your efforts, ideayoda, but the videos are just so brief, meer snippets. What do people think of this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=kSnTbZvX8a4



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