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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2012
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    83

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    Quote Originally Posted by supershorty628 View Post
    As an example of a jumper who does the derbies successfully, look at this video of Triompf and Holly Shepherd. He goes like a hunter, very level and sloooow off the ground. He also does the Grands Prix classes and does well in those, but notice his pace, the tempo of his canter, and how smoooooth the whole thing is:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnO-x-3L4_Q
    Holy Moly talk about a back cracking jumper.. I watched one of their jumper rounds as well.. dang..



  2. #22
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    Mar. 22, 2005
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    Where it is perpetually winter
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    ^Right? I watched a video of them in the Gulfport GP and he looked so tough to stay with!



  3. #23

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    Cute horse. I agree with supershorty628. You need to work on straightness and work on maintaining a steady pace. I suspect that part of your drifting to the right is that you are right handed and tend to be stronger on the right. As multiple others have mentioned, FLATWORK!!! Flatwork is important for jumpers. I'm not sure what you meant with your he's a jumper comment. Flatwork is important for all disciplines. I've seen many a teenage rider who does nothing but jump grow up and be amazed at how much better their horses go when they start taking flatwork seriously.

    I watched some of your other videos as well and you do need to release more. You caught your horse in the mouth a couple times. He's also inverted when he jumps. Perhaps this is why. He appears to have a short stride for a horse of his size. As someone has already suggested, some long and low work to help increase the stride wouldn't hurt.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2003
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    CA
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    10,364

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    Quote Originally Posted by supershorty628 View Post
    The rhythm and way of going are an issue if you want to be competitive in the hunters. He doesn't look the part. He looks like fun to ride and I bet he's really competitive in the jumpers because he's careful, but he's too scuttley to be competitive as a hunter, at least right now. If you want to work on that, I'd really concentrate on having one rhythm off the turn to the fence, but part of it may be the way he goes. He goes like a jumper. There's nothing wrong with that, but it doesn't pin well in the hunters.

    Like I said, I think he's cute and I'm more than willing to bet that you have an absolute blast in the jumpers with him, but I don't think the hunter division is his calling .

    As an example of a jumper who does the derbies successfully, look at this video of Triompf and Holly Shepherd. He goes like a hunter, very level and sloooow off the ground. He also does the Grands Prix classes and does well in those, but notice his pace, the tempo of his canter, and how smoooooth the whole thing is:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pnO-x-3L4_Q
    Absolutely! I think the scores you are reporting sound about right from watching that video. You definitely look like a jumper doing hunters...and it looks that way from the second you pick up the canter.

    Now, that doesn't mean there is anything wrong with doing the derbies for experience or because it's good for him, just that you may never achieve a level of success in the derbies that you might want to. Your horse is cute, can really benefit from flatwork and getting him straight, and looks like a fun ride...it just doesn't look like a hunter ride.

    You could also work on softening your position. You look a bit stiff and bracey against your horse and it doesn't help the overall impression. Equitation isn't about being able to hold your body in a perfect position...it's being so comfortable with the position that you body natural chooses that position while flowing with the horse. I don't see much flow with you. You look decently effective, you just haven't got to that next level where you are effective and soft. I struggle with the same thing...just so you know.

    I had to watch the horse supershorty posted do a Grand Prix because based on the derby video, I was like "No way is that a jumper". Now, that's the way to do hunters with a jumper.
    Keith: "Now...let's do something normal fathers and daughters do."
    Veronica: "Buy me a pony?"



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr. 3, 2003
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    Up the creek from bar.ka
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    A few things that might help you with the track and pace....

    1) Envision a tunnel around the course and that tunnel leads you right up the middle of the jumps and there is no room in the tunnel to shift left or right or zigzag. You have to keep your horse in the middle of that tunnel.

    2) You want to start and finish your course on the same tempo. If you were to start counting aloud out of the corner on your approach (1,2,3,FOUUUURRR,FIVE!,SIX!,S@#(* we're too close!) to the fences you would notice that about 3 strides out from a fence you put on the gas and then close up the distance too much and get too close to the fence, which I think is the reason your horse is jumping off to the side. He wants to be careful and is making room for himself. Remember, as the jumps get bigger, your horse has to leave the ground further away. Start working on exercises that will make you more comfortable with bigger distances.

    Watch the video again and count the rhythm of your canter with the outside hind leg as it hits the ground and you will see how often your tempo changes.

    I think if you slowed your tempo and found a way to keep it the same around the track you would be quite a pair in the hunter ring.
    Last edited by tidy rabbit; Nov. 19, 2012 at 03:21 PM.


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  6. #26
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    I know nothing. Just wanted to say how cute you two are together and that I enjoyed watching.


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  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
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    down the road from bar.ka
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    Late on here...but I really see alot more good then bad in this one. Much better then I thought it would be reading the post and I never go into much detail on these unless I like what I see so don't take this personally.

    But...just because it may be a Derby, this is a pretty basic Hunter course in a flat sand ring with common Hunter fences at routine distances and few options so it is going to be judged like a regular Hunter class.

    Your little pistol of a horse is brave and stylish but not really showing a regular pace and he has a wicked twist to the right behind over most of these fences. I don't know that that can be fixed and it is going to keep you down score wise in front of a knowledgeable judge.

    However, there are things already mentioned that you CAN do to improve your round like staying straight-you are letting him drift way off center over most fences. Giving a more generous release to show he can jump independently and you are not worried about control on landing would help your overall presentation.

    So would stopping the big move and mind changing the last 4 strides to the base of each fence...you make a big move to push forward then take back to create almost a chip-watch that last fence at 1:56 as an example. He is scooting sideways to sqeeze that last step in there...the one he did not need but that you asked him for at the last second. Learn to let him leave a gap and jump out of stride. He is actually being nice to you and giving you what you are asking for-mine would dump you if you asked for forward and choked back at the base.

    Lose the picking to the base, let him go and keep him straight over the center and that is going to help you. It's also going to let him relax a little without worrying about what you are doing at the base-might even relax that topline a little, he is dreading that picking to the base and getting defensive.

    I think you may be stuck with that twist behind over the top but you can minimize it and create a more Hunter like appearance with some time working on what has been suggested-that stuff will help in Jumpers too if that's the way you want to go and certainly in Eq over fences.

    Nicely turned out BTW.
    When opportunity knocks it's wearing overalls and looks like work.

    The horse world. Two people. Three opinions.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2010
    Location
    Houston, TX
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    Thanks everyone for you critiques! I'm heading home this weekend (college really takes a toll on my riding schedule ) and I'll be working on all these!



  9. #29
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    Apr. 21, 2012
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    Colorado
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    I think everyone has mentioned the things I noticed, just wanted to say he is gorgeous! I love his expression and that stride, my goodness! Beautiful!
    ~Over or Through~

    A Blog of Percy's Journey!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
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    Nov. 4, 2010
    Location
    Houston, TX
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    Thank you!



  11. #31
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    Jan. 2, 2007
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    Alpharetta
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    The reason you are so crooked is because he is not in front of your leg. You are holding his head. He must learn self carriage. He is jumping off his front end. this is very common and can be corrected.

    You have to go forward before you can get straight.

    So what I would do is really kick him up in front of your leg and work him off your leg. He needs to start looking for his aides from your leg not your hand.

    Let go of the reins and let your leg steer him, I like to say, give him the wheel, ie the front end, steer him from the back, you've heard a million times, back to front.
    Once he gets the steering from the leg, you can take a feel of his mouth, but continue to steer from the leg to straighten him. You will be amazed how much easier it is to be straight from the leg, not the rein. good luck, you ride nicely, he's really cute.



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