The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 12 of 12
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 16, 2007
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    862

    Default "Sit on him"

    Random question here. I often hear people refer to riding as "sitting on" him (or her.) As in "I sat on Max the other day." Is this just another way of saying riding, or is there ever the implication that someone can't really ride? I ask because I'm genuinely puzzled about this expression, and because it was directed at me the other day. It would seem that "sitting on" a horse means you are riding terribly. Maybe that's just me being self-conscious though.
    I saw the angel in the marble and I set him free. - Michaelangelo



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2007
    Location
    ....in a classroom in Fl, by the ocean
    Posts
    3,760

    Default

    I think 'sitting on' is similar to 'trying him out' or 'taking him/her for a spin'.

    I ride horses I train, I 'sit on' horses I am just testing out.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2007
    Location
    Maryland USA
    Posts
    1,491

    Default

    Some people (and whole countries) like to understate things.

    Two people might go to the same clinic on the weekend. One might come back and tell all their friends "I've started training under Olympic medalist blah blah blah". The other might say "I had a nice weekend. Sat on my young horse."

    You can read into it whatever you like, but without knowing the person and the context nobody is going to be able to interpret it for you.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 2, 2006
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    1,761

    Default

    I use that phrase, usually when I'm talking about a light ride. Like if I invest the time and energy into a good ride, I'll say I rode. If I hop on for 20 minutes to hack around on a loose rein, I may say I sat on my horse today.

    I've also said it when I'm referring to a new horse I hopped on for a few minutes - "I got to sit on Jane's horse today."

    I wouldn't read a lot into someone saying that, really.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2008
    Posts
    3,127

    Default

    What Gray Horse said.
    Flip a coin. It's not what side lands that matters, but what side you were hoping for when the coin was still in the air.

    You call it boxed wine. I call it carboardeaux.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Posts
    16,400

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jen-s View Post
    What Gray Horse said.
    Ayup.

    And for a young, just started horse, it means that I have literally done nothing more than gotten up on the back and looked around If I go look at a baby that "has been sat on" I expect little to no steering and probably no knowledge of leg = forward. I only expect that the horse knows that people sit up there.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2002
    Location
    Fairfax, VA USA
    Posts
    5,663

    Default

    A modern-day figure of speech, usually only meaning "ride", at least IME
    "Hope is a good thing, maybe the best of things, and no good thing ever dies."

    "It's supposed to be hard...the hard is what makes it great!" (Jimmy Dugan, "A League of Their Own")


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2005
    Location
    Unionville, PA
    Posts
    3,513

    Default

    My trainer uses it interchangeably with "ride". Like, "would you like me to sit on him" before a lesson. She certainly doesn't mean it as a light ride--she really puts him through his paces!
    Delaware Park Canter Volunteer
    http://www.canterusa.org/


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2012
    Posts
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    And for a young, just started horse, it means that I have literally done nothing more than gotten up on the back and looked around If I go look at a baby that "has been sat on" I expect little to no steering and probably no knowledge of leg = forward. I only expect that the horse knows that people sit up there.
    This is how I use it. Once a horse can walk around without a backup person on the ground holding him, I'd say he's been lightly started, but before that, if I'm just hanging out up there, he's been sat on.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2011
    Location
    Southern Pines, NC
    Posts
    2,336

    Default

    I use it a lot, normally when referring to a hack. Or sometimes if someone asks me how many I rode that day, I'll say something like, "Well I sat on 4, jumped one around a little.." so on so on.
    I've heard there's more to life than an FEI tent and hotel rooms, so I'm trying it.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    9,736

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    Ayup.

    And for a young, just started horse, it means that I have literally done nothing more than gotten up on the back and looked around If I go look at a baby that "has been sat on" I expect little to no steering and probably no knowledge of leg = forward. I only expect that the horse knows that people sit up there.
    My interpretation as well. I sat on Rory several times before he went to the trainer, we even took a spin in the stall.
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

    COTH's official mini-donk enabler.
    Odie, aka the Evil Burrito, is on Facebook.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 23, 2002
    Location
    Eastern MA
    Posts
    2,369

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Gray Horse H/J View Post
    I use that phrase, usually when I'm talking about a light ride. Like if I invest the time and energy into a good ride, I'll say I rode. If I hop on for 20 minutes to hack around on a loose rein, I may say I sat on my horse today.

    I've also said it when I'm referring to a new horse I hopped on for a few minutes - "I got to sit on Jane's horse today."

    I wouldn't read a lot into someone saying that, really.
    Yes, this. Though instead of "sat on" I just stick w/ the "hopped on."



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 110
    Last Post: Sep. 17, 2013, 06:44 PM
  2. Replies: 14
    Last Post: Sep. 16, 2013, 05:46 PM
  3. Replies: 147
    Last Post: Nov. 30, 2012, 08:08 PM
  4. Replies: 131
    Last Post: Jul. 5, 2010, 09:28 AM
  5. Replies: 59
    Last Post: Oct. 17, 2008, 06:52 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness