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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
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    296

    Default Help me start the negotiation!

    I'm sure I just need to grow a pair, but....

    I'm literally sick at my stomach at the thought of calling to try and make an offer on a horse I'm interested in. I think the horse is priced pretty well, but I would feel like an idiot if I didn't try and negotiate at least a little bit. But the thought of calling someone and offering less than the asking price just makes me terribly anxious, and I don't know why.

    I think I'm always trying to please people, and I'm afraid I will disappoint/anger the seller if I try to make an offer lower than asking price (maybe 10% lower than asking, no more).

    Please, someone, tell me how to get this process started - if I could do it in email, it would be so much easier, but that doesn't seem quite right.

    I'm sure part of it is also that advance "buyer's remorse" I get anytime I make a big purchase, no matter what it is. I really like this horse, but my DH keeps telling me he doesn't think I'm that excited about it. I was thrilled with the horse, until I started thinking about all the logistics and trying to get a deal done.

    Any advice? Please? I'm sitting here procrastinating, because I'm dreading making this call. I'm terrible at negotiation!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2011
    Location
    Madison, GA
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    Default

    All you need is a little confidence Negotiating is very common and the seller will not be insulted at all, as long as you don't go completely off the deep end like the guy who gave me what he considered a serious offer of $1,500 for my WB gelding who is priced at $17,500.
    Southern Cross Guest Ranch
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  3. #3

    Default

    Have you seen the horse in person? What did you like about the horse, and what did you not like about it? Are you doing a PPE? Does the horse have any maintenance issues?

    There are lots of reasons to negotiate a price, and there are also equally as many reasons not to negotiate. If the horse is perfect in every single way -- so much that you would be devastated if you lost it to another interested buyer who was willing to pay asking price -- then I would ante up the asking price. Most sellers won't give you notice they have another buyer willing to pay full price for fear of losing both potential sales.

    I would consider what part of the horse you are "settling" for, and then act accordingly. If it's making you sick to your stomach to think about making an offer, maybe your stomach is trying to tell you that's not such a great idea.
    Lorelei Welsh Ponies - Visit us on Facebook!
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2012
    Posts
    141

    Default

    I don't have any advice of my own as I've only bought one horse and it wasn't a negotiation type of situation but this article may help!
    http://www.chronofhorse.com/article/...asonable-offer



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Posts
    296

    Default

    Yes, have seen the horse, tried the horse on multiple occasions, have a PPE scheduled, have a question or two about some things, but she is by far the best horse I've seen in six months of looking.

    I guess it is a mindframe thing - I feel like I'm going to the buyer and saying "Please sir, may I buy your horse?" instead of the person offering to spend a lot of money and who should be in the driver's seat. I don't know how to snap out of that mindframe so I can call the seller with confidence.....of course, it doesn't help that the seller says he has a couple of other people interested in the horse. That just ups the pressure.


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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 22, 2000
    Location
    NY
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    15,119

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by OveroHunter View Post
    .... as long as you don't go completely off the deep end like the guy who gave me what he considered a serious offer of $1,500 for my WB gelding who is priced at $17,500.
    Wow. He was a little confused about the old ~10% rule of thumb.


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  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westchester County, NY
    Posts
    976

    Default

    You think the horse is pretty well priced. Save yourself the worry, offer the price less the cost to ship the horse to your stable and call it a day.
    If the horse is priced fairly why not just buy him/her?
    http://STA551.com
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
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    Default

    The price is about 10% above what I would really like to pay. I'd feel ecstatic, thrilled, and completely satisfied if I could get her for 10% below the asking price. I wouldn't walk away from her for the full price, but it would probably leave me with a slightly bitter feeling.....you don't know if you don't ask, right?

    If only I could bring myself to do the asking....
    Last edited by KingoftheRoad; Nov. 16, 2012 at 10:14 AM.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2012
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    1,994

    Default

    All they can do is say no and stay firm, right? Unless it's an insultingly low offer, the seller isn't likely to walk away altogether. I attempted to negotiate for my current gelding, even though he was fairly priced, and the seller just said no, full price. I bought him anyway. You don't have anything to lose at this point by just asking!


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  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2011
    Location
    Madison, GA
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    Default

    The guy just randomly drove up asking if he could buy that "big, beautiful, bay horse in the front paddock" and offered $1,500. DH said to add another zero and they could start talking
    Southern Cross Guest Ranch
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    RIP Bocephus March 2008 - April 2013


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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KingoftheRoad View Post
    I wouldn't walk away from him for the full price, but it would probably leave me with a slightly bitter feeling.....you don't know if you don't ask, right?

    If only I could bring myself to do the asking....
    Well, honey, you just have a math problem on your hands: What amount are you willing to pay in order to not feel bitter upside your head?

    There's not right or wrong answer since you like the horse and it's just 10% and you do have the money to pay it. Six months from now, enjoying your new ride, will you really say "Yabbut, I paid X,XXX too much for all this."

    But if you do want to use this as a growth opportunity, try making yourself like the seller first. That sounds weird, but it does help you be willing to walk into the negotiation with an intention to get what you want as best you can.

    I hope you can find a way to your new horse that pleases you.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
    Location
    Boston Area
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    8,491

    Default

    It seems like you've gone pretty far down the path to buying the horse if you have already scheduled a PPE. I usually do my negotiating before that point since if you are having any films done, you can wrack up serious $$ with the vet exam and because when you get that far you are saying to the seller that you have serious intent to buy the horse at the price you've discussed with them.

    When you say you have a couple of questions are they soundness questions? or suitability questions?

    If the vet finds something significant in the PPE, you might have a bargaining point but I wouldn't count on it.

    If you want to negotiate, I'd do it soon .

    As a seller, I don't want to get down to the wire thinking that I've sold the horse for a certain price and then be asked to settle for less, especially if I've taken the horse off the market during this process.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 30, 2006
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    1,137

    Default

    Just do it. Sellers don't get upset by offers. Unless, as previously mentioned, they are insultingly low!

    I kind of feel like everyone in the horse world is now watching American Pickers or something... Making offers of HALF the asking price. Ha!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Posts
    296

    Default

    I have a minor soundness question on this mare, that I'll get checked on the PPE, but I don't plan to use that to negotiate. If there is something bad enough to show up on the PPE that I could use to negotiate, I'll end up walking away from the deal.

    I'm planning to talk to the seller tomorrow, I just have to get up the nerve to call him.....



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Default

    Here's your script:

    "I really like Pookah. Would you take X for him?"

    And X here is asking price minus 10%.

    Want a plan to save face if the seller refuses?

    You say, "I hear you. He's a nice horse but I'll need to get back to you. Can you give me a day? I will get back to you. Thanks so much."

    Or do as the another poster suggested: Ask for some concession that saves you a bit, even if not your 10%.

    Again, if you *like* the seller in your mind, it makes this transaction less of an ego-thing with you feeling like someone is winning and someone is losing if you want to pay the "wrong" amount.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  16. #16
    Join Date
    May. 8, 2005
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    between here and there...in Arizona
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    587

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KingoftheRoad View Post
    ....of course, it doesn't help that the seller says he has a couple of other people interested in the horse. That just ups the pressure.
    I'm sure many say this even if they don't have others coming to look.


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  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2009
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    4,994

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Koniucha View Post
    I'm sure many say this even if they don't have others coming to look.
    That is what I was just going to say. I think pretty much every seller uses that line for anything...its to give the buyer a sense of urgency.

    How long has the horse been on the market? That will make a difference too. Don't be afraid to negotiate. Like someone else said, the worst they can say is "sorry, price is firm" and then you can either decide to go for it, or keep looking. Thats what happened to me-I tried to get them to drop the price to offset PPE and shipping, they said no. Horse was pretty much spot on for my budget, had a clean PPE and was everything I wanted so I sucked it up and paid the asking price.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2010
    Location
    california
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    4,676

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KingoftheRoad View Post
    Yes, have seen the horse, tried the horse on multiple occasions, have a PPE scheduled, have a question or two about some things, but she is by far the best horse I've seen in six months of looking.

    I guess it is a mindframe thing - I feel like I'm going to the buyer and saying "Please sir, may I buy your horse?" instead of the person offering to spend a lot of money and who should be in the driver's seat. I don't know how to snap out of that mindframe so I can call the seller with confidence.....of course, it doesn't help that the seller says he has a couple of other people interested in the horse. That just ups the pressure.
    Oh come now, join the rest of us who bit off a lot and always seem to have buyers remorse no matter what ! That is what a glass of wine is for. I bought my second horse a year and a half ago and I wake up thinking "what have I done?" still....it is all good, it is a horse.


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  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2008
    Location
    MD
    Posts
    3,852

    Default

    Its really not that hard. The best way to approach it is to say "I really like the horse? Would you take $$$ for him." They will either say yes or no and you can negotiate from there. But whatever you do, make sure you have a CONTRACT!

    Contracts can be simple. It just needs to spell out the buyer and seller, the identity of the horse (name and general description), the agreed upon price, whether or not there is a deposit, and whether or not the sale (and/or return of deposit) is contingent upon approval of the PPE. If the horse is from out of state and being shipped, be sure to specify when/how the horse will be shipped, and what health inspection or registration papers need to arrive with the horse.

    If health inspections and/or registration papers are required, be sure to specify that they will arrive with the horse, or the horse goes back (at your discretion) and seller pays the round trip shipping fees! This motivates the seller to get their act together and send you what you've agreed upon.
    Lowly Farm Hand with Delusions of Barn Biddieom.
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  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2005
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    192

    Default

    I'm not a trainer, but I'll give you a story that happened to me: I had my guy listed at 12.5 but was *very* serious about it being the perfect forever home. Lady emailed me and asked if I'd take $8500 and to come down to see his forever, perfect home. I sold him for that price after seeing her place and talking with her. (and the PPE, trainer eval, etc, etc)



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