The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 9 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 169
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec. 23, 2005
    Location
    Harrisonburg, VA
    Posts
    2,322

    Default American Sport Pony Registry

    Seeking information about the American Sport Pony Registry? How important do you feel it would be to try to certify a stallion? Is it a new trend? Would it be more meaningful in some parts of the country than others?
    Windswept Stables-Specializing in Ponies
    Sales, Breaking,Training,Showing, Stud Service

    Home of 2008 Sire of Year Reserve Champion
    Pony Hunter Breeding - Empires Power

    www.EmpiresPower.com



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    I asked a very similar question on here last Summer/Fall regarding registering and getting my stallion and breeding stock registered with ASPR. I was seeking stallion owners that had gone this route in particular. I have yet to speak to one that feels that their investment in this registry has resulted in more breedings or has provided any return at all to them. It seems like most of the people who go with this registry are doing it because they feel there is value in the inspection process and having registered foals but a problem or a perception with this registry is that they take a very wide variety of types of ponies and there seems to be a lack of consistency in what types they take as well as quality. The concensus seemed to be that for pony hunters the ASPR was much less popular or valuable than the people focusing on dressage with their programs.

    I decided to wait before spending all that money in registering a stallion and then having to produce 10 First Premium offspring in 3 years....a very expensive venture. I also have a non traditional breed with it's own bloodline based registry. Hopefully some more folks will get on here and share their experiences with you.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 23, 2005
    Location
    Harrisonburg, VA
    Posts
    2,322

    Default American sport pony

    Daydream Believer,
    Thanks for your input. I had not heard of the registry til this past week when a pony breeder in VA told me that she absolutely loved my stallion but would only use him if I registered my boy with American Sport Pony as that is what she wants to limit her program to. This is the first call that I have received as such and wanted to find out more information.

    I thought perhaps this was the up and coming thing, although--most pony hunter breeders here in Virginia are not expressing desire for the certification.

    I certainly would like to open doors for my stallion, but on the other hand--it sounds like a process with many hoops to jump thru to accomplish it.
    I would certainly like to know more about the criteria used for scoring and would like to be assured of consistent criteria among the registry inspection phase.
    -- Does anyone else have information to offer? thoughts on the importance ? Does anyone limit their breeding program to only stallions in this registry?
    Windswept Stables-Specializing in Ponies
    Sales, Breaking,Training,Showing, Stud Service

    Home of 2008 Sire of Year Reserve Champion
    Pony Hunter Breeding - Empires Power

    www.EmpiresPower.com



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2000
    Location
    Montrose, CO USA
    Posts
    721

    Default

    As I thought I had answered also in the previous thread mentioned above, I have always loved the inspection/approval process, have always used it with my warmbloods, and when I purchased 2 very small sport pony type Welsh stallions, ASPR was the only one interested in very small stallions. My purpose was to use them on my and others' wb program, already proven mares to produce large sport and hunter ponies. Personally I won't breed to a stallion, large or small, that isn't approved with registries of my choice either. The grading process for foals has always been a key for me, and good scores allow me to sell foals at a younger age for more money, because they come with a "report card" about quality. Same for the stallions. Inspection/approval and then licensing gives them a resume that as 5 year olds, they wouldn't otherwise have. Not to mention the difficulty of promoting a pony stallion in performance, when he can't be shown in pony hunters or pony jumpers, and when he's too small for most adults. My Section B was in training for dressage with a small trainer, and My Section A at 11.1 hands can really only be driven for now. Otherwise you get to wait the years and years for offspring to get out and win or for your stallion to get really good at whatever discipline you're spending all that training money in. For me the ASPR fees were actually a whole lot less, when I sat down and figured it out.

    Previously the hunter folks haven't been as interested in the approval process, but this seems to be changing. The pony hunter folks may or may not join the ranks. ASPR for my purposes has been well worth the investment of time and money for these reasons:

    All the breedings to both my stallions have come from and because of ASPR registry.

    My stallions have a resume and are licensed much sooner and for less money than they would have a winning performance career going.

    My foals usually score very well (National Futurity Reserve Champion, high scoring First Premium, Premier, etc.), and are easier to sell at younger ages.

    I have sport horse breeding trained judges (sometimes one visiting from a top breeding program in Europe) to evaluate my program, stallions, mares and foals.

    Since I'm in the business of promoting and selling breedings to my stallions and young ponies, I can't think of a better, easier way for me to do this than being involved with the American Sportpony Registry.

    Here's a page of photos from last year's inspection:
    www.RainbowFarm.com/aspr.html
    Barb Young
    www.RainbowFarm.com
    www.BarbYoungPhotography.com
    equine photography in western CO USA



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2003
    Posts
    1,919

    Default

    I could care less when I buy a prospect, but I do the pony hunters. I care more about bloodlines and show records. I know some fabulous hunter producing stallions who didn't get the highest inspection scores.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    Sorry, I stand corrected...one stallion owner has told me that they have shown a return for their investment as Rainbow pointed out above. She is the only one so far. I have met no one else who has said that is so and met a number who said that not one breeding came from it to include someone I know well who owns several stallions registered with ASPR...imported GRP's. I went to Kathy's repro class with a lady who raises British Riding ponies and she said the same thing...she spent loads of money on the inspection, fees, etc... but has seen nothing come back from it. A number were also unhappy about the scoring as I recall.

    I wanted to add that I tried to find my old thread but it's not here anymore. I think if my memory serves, only Rainbow had anything really favorable to say from the stallion owners perspective. A couple of mare owners came on and said they would only breed to an approved stallion...but only a couple....some said they really did not care. Several folks with approved stallions came on and said they felt like they wasted their money.

    I sincerely hope that the folks who do put out literally thousands of dollars to go this route will get their investment back. I think the concept is great and am not totally against the idea...but definitely waiting right now to wait and see what becomes of the registry as well as the direction my own program is going in. I think I had it figured out that it would cost me $2500 just to register my breeding stock, DNA test and have an inspection just last year...not counting subsequent years. I had three foals to present last year and each year you'd have to haul your babies to an inspection...pay DNA, inspection and registration fees, or try to get mare owners that bred to your stallion to do so with their foals. Many young stallion owners give away breedings to get those 10 foals inspected in 3 years and still don't make it. I'm not sure what happens if you don't meet that requirement. It is a substantial investment and one you will have to do a cost benefit analysis to see if it will really pay you back as well as can you even meet the full requirements for full approval.
    Last edited by Daydream Believer; Mar. 23, 2006 at 10:09 AM.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2003
    Location
    The rolling hills of Virginia
    Posts
    5,892

    Default

    Well, I would think it depends a lot on your intended market. I too am in Virginia, and of course, we have the VPBA which has a well established reputation and has been around for a long time. It also focuses on hunter ponies, as a I can see you already know.

    But it is unavailable outside Virginia and is not of great intrest to the non-hunter sport pony types. However, your stallion (who is lovely BTW) would probably be of great interest to a larger audience than just the hunters and also far outside just Virginia.

    I am in a similar position than you, as I have a small WB stallion (although at 15.1, not a pony). Most of my VA mare owners will go the VPBA route. But the ones in Kentucky and Indiana want him with the APSR. And between them I have enough specific intrest to present him. It is not an inexpensive proposition - esp. not in the economics of ponies. But probably worth a call to them if the interest of you mare owners dictate it.

    Please let me know if you go this fall - as I would really like to know one other soul there!

    SCFarm
    The above post is an opinion, just an opinion. If it were a real live fact it would include supporting links to websites full of people who already agreed with me.

    www.southern-cross-farm.com



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2005
    Location
    near historic Gettysburg PA
    Posts
    2,678

    Default

    I have a very young ASPR stallion, I feel it has generated interest in him , verified his quality way more than me stating his virtues AND ,, I could not pay this little for a marketing program that runs all year long. I have seen immense strides in the ASPR in the last six months, New awards programs, IBC classes at UDSF shows last year etc.. They ARE making every attempt to help their membership , and THAT is a reason to be involved alone, It has only been ??three?? years since they broke off from the AWR to have a total identity of their own. With North America's gigantic Hunter market, the ASPR is working hard to acknowledge excellence in this direction, as well as dressage, driving , eventing and jumper ponies.
    The reason it may not have helped with the GRP marketing is that the GRP has its own "niche"
    Last edited by MagicRoseFarm; Mar. 23, 2006 at 10:49 AM.
    "It's not how good you ride, It's how good your horse covers for you." -Kristan
    Magic Rose Farm- home of Beste Gold & Hot Shot
    Beste Gold & Offspring on Facebook
    Magic Rose Farm Warmbloods on FB



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 19, 2003
    Location
    Citra, Fl, USA
    Posts
    1,882

    Default

    Windswept...is this the section K stallion on your website? He is lovely! I admit to being one of the people Daydream Beliver alluded to that is not a fan of ASPR because of the huge range in type and quality they accept. I am sure this is going to anger some people(no flames intended...just my 2cents)...and there are some great ponies in that registry...it is just in general not on target with my breeding goals.

    Why don't you consider one of the Warmblood pony registries for your boy like Weser-Ems (my particular registry of choice) or RPSI? I think he would be appreciated!
    Bets of luck!
    Heather
    Whispered Wish Weser-Ems: Breeding quality German Riding Ponies!
    Standing the stallion Burberry
    www.germanridingpony.com
    www.facebook.com/HighlifesBurberry



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2002
    Location
    it's not the edge of the earth, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    12,079

    Default

    I've been 'shopping' for a long time for the right niche for my stallion, and for a while for a junior stallion I had. My experience is probably not as useful as those with smalls and mediums, since mine are Cob/Large size, but here it is FWIW.

    What I found was I was very pleased with the AWS (they have a Sportpony division) inspection process and the scores and comments seemed to be right in line with what we were getting at open USDF SHIH shows. But then the farm hosting the inspections was sold, and now I'd have to travel a day or two to get to an inspection. In fact, they had down on my guy's papers that he was in the SP division (I had him in a horseshoe stallion bit which may have bee a faux pas) but when measured realized he wasn't quite. He had a VERY bad day, through no fault of his own, and was .08 away from automatic stallion approveal. We still have to do performance requirements now.

    I *personally* have had not-so-great experiences with inquiries to AWR, and at the time AWS seemed to be a better decision. PERSONALLY. I'm sure as an entity, they are just as valid and useful as any of the others, but they left just about as bad a taste in my mouth as the ATA did when I tried to reg my ancient Malachit daughter. May have been a bad time, a bad day... Not sure. But for the amount of investment... I wanted a bit more... courtesy is not quite the right word, but welcoming maybe?

    RPSI would/will be my choice when/if I decide to bring another colt along... My experience with them has been nothing but professional, welcoming, educational... BUT... I haven't gone that route with Papa *yet* becuase the expense is just exorbitant. I do not live in an area where the performance requirements can be met easily, and certainly I cannot afford a 100DT. We are working on the performance requirements, but it's almost redundant if you think about it--if he's got the performance requirements behind him, he's got the 'resume' and proof that mareowners are looking for. His foals out of RPSI mares are eligible for book II *without* his approveal (pending inspection scores, of course, which haven't been a problem.)

    The only problem is I would so much *rather* give my money to an American organization, as I truly believe in American horses & breeding.

    I completely, entirely agree with the value of inspections at a young age, and the hopefully standardized comparison to the ideal. BUT-- as a mareowner, I'm happy to see that from SHIH shows or other show results as well as a registry.

    I *do* think it's getting better, and in time the US organizations will be viable options. I really feel right now it depends greatly on where you live and what is available to you as far as inspections and/or then shows to get the performance requirements...
    InnisFailte Pinto Sporthorses & Coloured Cobs
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Bits are like cats, what's one more? (Petstorejunkie)



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2001
    Location
    Kentucky bluegrass
    Posts
    1,242

    Default

    I think the ASPR is an excellent option for many breeders for several reasons, though only one of my three pony stallions are registered with them and I can't say that I have gotten inquiries/bookings specifically because of the registry to the stallion that is ASPR registered.

    The other two stallions have not been presented to them. One will definitely not be, as he is not only purebred Connemara, but also older, has a performance record and foals who are performing successfully.

    The younger Connemara stallion may be presented to ASPR in the future. I have found, generally, that being able to provide half-bred registration options through the Connemara Society registry seems to generate the majority of bookings where the mare owner is interested in "papers". If I do present him to any "sportpony" registry, it would be the ASPR, however.

    I have a small (15.1) 3/4 Oldenburg stallion that has been registered with ASPR and has preliminary approval. Whether this is something that will generate more bookings for him eventually or not, I don't know.

    I do have a young 4th generation sportpony colt that will likely be presented to ASPR when he is mature. He is 3/8 Oldenburg, his great-grandsire a Class I licensed stallion imported from Germany, but he is not eligible for any of the "European warmblood" sportpony registries because there were none available for the intervening generations between the Oldenburg stallion and this colt.

    This is the major problem I see with the "warmblood" sportpony registries, they are so restrictive that breeders are very limited in what they can present, especially if they have an established sportpony breeding program that predates the establishment of those registry options here in the U.S. or have a breed that is not approved to be inspected for those registries.

    At the present time, what I find particularly useful is having an outside evaluation of type and movement for the foals I produce. I may or may not agree with the scoring, depending on my goals, which may or may not coincide totally with what the inspectors evaluate for ... but it does give me a consistent standard to evaluate from, providing me with a good "reality check" on what I'm producing.

    For me, the ASPR gives me enough flexibility to continue with my established breeding program, which RPSI, Wiser-Ems and ISR certainly does not. Whether it will eventually prove to be effective from a marketing perspective I don't know, but I do think they are working to try to make it more effective and more useful to American sportpony breeders. For me, the fact that they are not as restrictive and do approve a wider variety of type is a definite advantage, rather than a disadvantage and I think it may prove to be more advantageous to American breeders in the long term.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 23, 2005
    Location
    Harrisonburg, VA
    Posts
    2,322

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hluing
    Windswept...is this the section K stallion on your website? He is lovely! I admit to being one of the people Daydream Beliver alluded to that is not a fan of ASPR because of the huge range in type and quality they accept. I am sure this is going to anger some people(no flames intended...just my 2cents)...and there are some great ponies in that registry...it is just in general not on target with my breeding goals.

    Why don't you consider one of the Warmblood pony registries for your boy like Weser-Ems (my particular registry of choice) or RPSI? I think he would be appreciated!
    Bets of luck!
    Heather
    Hluing --Yes...Empire's Power is my welsh section K. Thank you so much.
    Do the registries you refer to --weser-ems and rpsi require turning the stallion over to someone for 30 days? I really can not let our guy go to strangers for 30 days. He is too special to us to have his care out of our hands. I have heard nightmare stories with those type.
    Thanks for the information. Love your website & ponies.
    Windswept Stables-Specializing in Ponies
    Sales, Breaking,Training,Showing, Stud Service

    Home of 2008 Sire of Year Reserve Champion
    Pony Hunter Breeding - Empires Power

    www.EmpiresPower.com



  13. #13
    Join Date
    May. 6, 1999
    Location
    Ocala, FL
    Posts
    10,426

    Default

    <<Previously the hunter folks haven't been as interested in the approval process, but this seems to be changing. >>

    Sorry, Barb, but I have to express my skepticism here, too. Maybe out in your neck of the woods, but it's still the kiss of death in mine--unless they are looking for a cheapie ($5k tops). "Sportpony" has gained no heightened respect in hunter land (or elsewhere, I dare say) from the existance of any of the new registries. Indeed, I fear the problem is actually being increased by them because ponies get this or that premium or score and then their owners attach either ridiculous price tags or haughty attitudes to them and it scares the trainers off even more (i.e. those who make rational, rather emotional buying decisions).

    I suspect that what is evolving is two-fold: 1.) the import trend--not to be confused with the sportpony breeding concept: imports are made ponies (liek the GRPs and BRPs that are in the show ring) and/or made pony lines (like some of the recently imported Welsh stallions), and 2.) a dressage trend, but both are based on performance, not pedigree or inspection. It's got to walk the walk, not just talk the talk these days. Money is just too tight for anything else, except from hobbyists who aren't looking to compete. For better to invest in showing the stallion himself and also into getting his babies shown--another problem with inspections: a lot of the folks who go in for them with their mares and babies just never manage to follow through by campaigning them elsewhere. That doesn't help a stallion owner much. Show 'em and advertise the results--a much better return on your $$$ than inspecting them and hoping someone notices, cares, breeds and then shows the result of it all.
    Sportponies Unlimited
    Athletic Thoroughbred crosses for the highly motivated, smaller rider.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Sportpony
    This is the major problem I see with the "warmblood" sportpony registries, they are so restrictive that breeders are very limited in what they can present, especially if they have an established sportpony breeding program that predates the establishment of those registry options here in the U.S. or have a breed that is not approved to be inspected for those registries.

    For me, the ASPR gives me enough flexibility to continue with my established breeding program, which RPSI, Wiser-Ems and ISR certainly does not. Whether it will eventually prove to be effective from a marketing perspective I don't know, but I do think they are working to try to make it more effective and more useful to American sportpony breeders. For me, the fact that they are not as restrictive and do approve a wider variety of type is a definite advantage, rather than a disadvantage and I think it may prove to be more advantageous to American breeders in the long term.
    It was this factor that actually drew me to this registry initially as I also have a nontraditional breeding program that those registries will not accept. My comment about consistency in scoring was not really related to what Hluing said earlier but my own observations attending their inspections and research I did. I saw a foundation type QH mare over 15 hands approved 1st Premium in the sport pony book....and that one made me scratch my head seriously as she could not move at all and had very typical QH type conformation...

    I will say also that a year ago when I was looking seriously at this, I got on every website of every ASPR breeder they had linked on the registry website and looked at what they approved and what the scores were. I saw some very...ummm...very "average" is the only word I can use honestly....stallions that were first premiums standing there next to some fabulous ones that seemed to deserve the scores. I mean butt high, bad legs, just not sport pony types like stock horses and tiny little thelwell types also.

    I went back on and looked again for the same sites but they've changed their site to only have 2006 approved stallions or something like that so all the other ones aren't there anymore. The ones I saw on there today all looked super nice but I have to wonder why all the stallions are not listed on there anymore.

    I also had a not so great experience with AWR/ASPR a few years earlier at an inspection at a private farm coupled with a major misunderstanding last summer regarding a cancelled private inspection. At this point if I do go with a sport pony/horse registry it will most likely be AWS. Talking to them was like a breath of sunshine after dealing with the ASPR.

    After last summer's problems with the registry, I really did some soul searching on just what my goals were and decided to wait a bit and see what the outside interest in my non trad. bred stallion turned out to be. Another stallion owner of our breed had her young stallion inspected and approved 1st Premium last Fall and it will be interesting to see how it pans out for her program.

    As a producer of youngsters also...it just seems like what most buyers want are babies that will perform and suit their needs and are much less interested in inspection scores and papers. I hear the WB breeders complain about that quite often also so I don't think it's just the ponies in this case.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 23, 2005
    Location
    Harrisonburg, VA
    Posts
    2,322

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pwynnnorman
    <<Previously the hunter folks haven't been as interested in the approval process, but this seems to be changing. >>

    I suspect that what is evolving is two-fold: 1.) the import trend--not to be confused with the sportpony breeding concept: imports are made ponies (liek the GRPs and BRPs that are in the show ring) and/or made pony lines (like some of the recently imported Welsh stallions),

    Show 'em and advertise the results--a much better return on your $$$ than inspecting them and hoping someone notices, cares, breeds and then shows the result of it all.
    Pwynnorman -- I do not follow the import trend statement above. Please elaborate. Most ALL of the famous pony lines in our country have roots back to being imported.
    Imported ponies today come in different varieties--some are genuine "made" ponies, others come in green as grass and have to be made up, and others come in made for one discipline-- fall into other hands and have to learn a new job --so are actually green.
    Please explain what a made pony line is....... Does that mean the stallion has offspring that are made and performing wel?

    And I do agree--showing the stallion is a great idea. But then -the age old delima--of not many hunter classes for a junior to show pony stallions in. Not many people actually care about winning in hopeful hunter.
    We have shown our stallion and he got great publicity by being in public. He performed well and we were able to get some great video on him.
    But still-- if there are customers that see all of the above and still will not breed because there is no ASPR certificate--- what to do?
    Being in Virginia, we do have the VPBA --but as the above poster said--folks outside Virginia may or may not care about that either.
    Thanks for your information.
    Windswept Stables-Specializing in Ponies
    Sales, Breaking,Training,Showing, Stud Service

    Home of 2008 Sire of Year Reserve Champion
    Pony Hunter Breeding - Empires Power

    www.EmpiresPower.com



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Aug. 19, 2003
    Location
    Citra, Fl, USA
    Posts
    1,882

    Default

    Windswept...your ponies pedegree and type should be very acceptable to all the registries I mentioned. I would recommend emailing them directly for more info. If you need email addresses, check out GRPbreeders.org...they should all be there

    As far as the 30 day test, I believe many people send there own riders. RPSI just had there first this year...Weser-Ems, I do not believe they currently require a 30 day test...email them to find out...Mareile is great to work with!

    Good luck whichever route you take...he is a beautiful pony.
    Whispered Wish Weser-Ems: Breeding quality German Riding Ponies!
    Standing the stallion Burberry
    www.germanridingpony.com
    www.facebook.com/HighlifesBurberry



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2004
    Location
    MA
    Posts
    1,769

    Default

    Wow, very nice stallion! Congrats on such a beautiful boy.

    I just want to say 'ditto' to what hluing has said. Definitely look at Weser Ems and RPSI for your boy. He is lovely and I'm sure that the GRP mare owners would love to have him as an option!
    Linda
    Home of EM Day Dream, SPS Pakesa, & SPS Destiny
    Breeders of USDF HOY Reminisce HM and USDF Reserve HOY Legacy HM
    http://wbstallions.net/hof-mendenhall/



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Posts
    448

    Default

    Someone else mentioned the AWS and wanting to invest in American programs.

    I know there are mixed feelings on the AWS, but, I have grown to really enjoy working with them. Every person I have spoken with, affiliated with them has been more than helpful and wonderfully welcoming and friendly. I don't use them as the sole approval outlet for our kiddos, but, I use them frequently.

    I have found that their responses often echo exactly what I see in a horse and on occasion surprise me here and there in a positive direction. And, I find their fees to be on the lower end of the spectrum and therefore not such a huge thing to swallow cost-wise.

    Is it worth approving your sport pony stallion? I can't answer with a lot of education, as we don't do frequent ponies. But, from a *personal* standpoint, I would prefer to have an approved stallion versus an unapproved stallion. (And that may just be habit because of our majority work with wbs)

    I also have to agree that approvals are a quicker way for a young kiddo to have a 'report card'. If one does not have the ability to rattle off performance success immediately -- ie show-ring -- there is still the rather safe feeling of knowing that you are selecting a stallion that has proven himself in some way. IE in this neck of the woods I don't see too many ponies competing, and attaining performance credentials would take a significant amount of time, money to haul in and out, and so forth that would outweigh the costs of getting a breeding approval. There would also be fewer comparisons to make between my pony and whomever it was competing against given lack of competition. IMHO

    Just my two cents



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 28, 2000
    Location
    Montrose, CO USA
    Posts
    721

    Default

    I will say also that a year ago when I was looking seriously at this, I got on every website of every ASPR breeder they had linked on the registry website and looked at what they approved and what the scores were. I saw some very...ummm...very "average" is the only word I can use honestly....stallions that were first premiums standing there next to some fabulous ones that seemed to deserve the scores.

    I went back on and looked again for the same sites but they've changed their site to only have 2006 approved stallions or something like that so all the other ones aren't there anymore. The ones I saw on there today all looked super nice but I have to wonder why all the stallions are not listed on there anymore.
    ASPR stallions listed previously, but not for 2006, probably didn't fulfill their licensing requirements, aren't breeding anymore or were sold, etc. That happens in every registry. The approved stallion list includes stallions with only preliminary approval in hand, so there will always be those who did not go forward through licensing requirements for whatever reason.

    ASPR and AWR have redone the site, and added an Office Manager, who is quite user friendly
    Barb Young
    www.RainbowFarm.com
    www.BarbYoungPhotography.com
    equine photography in western CO USA



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 4, 2002
    Location
    Suffolk, VA
    Posts
    16,684

    Default

    Thanks for the explanation Barb. I'm glad to hear they've added an office manager as well.



Similar Threads

  1. American Warmblood Registry?
    By Angelray in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: May. 21, 2012, 07:12 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: Jun. 20, 2011, 10:31 AM
  3. Sport Pony Registry(ies) and Foals Question Here. . .
    By erinwillow in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Dec. 25, 2009, 10:44 AM
  4. 2nd poll - a new American registry
    By DownYonder in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: Oct. 29, 2008, 08:13 PM
  5. Survey - a new American registry?
    By DownYonder in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 171
    Last Post: Oct. 29, 2008, 12:31 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness