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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2012
    Posts
    10

    Default Getting to the top in Hunter/Jumper(:

    Soo I want to be a professional hunter/jumper rider... where should I start? I don't really have to worry about money, I have a ton saved up. I have 2 horses and they have really helped me, but i'm looking for a younger horse to get me to the top. I'm switching to A rated next spring and will be trying to show at least once a month, hopefully more. What shows should I go to once i'm doing good at A shows? The biggest show by me is in Iowa and it's AA and theres one in the cities that has Grand Prix and it's A rated. Should I show in Jumpers, Hunters, and Eq.?

    Thank you(:



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2008
    Posts
    825

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by equineobsession6 View Post
    Soo I want to be a professional hunter/jumper rider... where should I start? I don't really have to worry about money, I have a ton saved up. I have 2 horses and they have really helped me, but i'm looking for a younger horse to get me to the top. I'm switching to A rated next spring and will be trying to show at least once a month, hopefully more. What shows should I go to once i'm doing good at A shows? The biggest show by me is in Iowa and it's AA and theres one in the cities that has Grand Prix and it's A rated. Should I show in Jumpers, Hunters, and Eq.?

    Thank you(:
    who wants to go first?
    When the boogeyman goes to sleep, he checks the closet for George Morris. -mpsbarnmanager


    12 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2012
    Posts
    10

    Default

    I'm also going for Rio. (:



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 22, 2007
    Location
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    809

    Default

    Oh, boy, here we go!
    "On the back of a horse I felt whole, complete, connected to that vital place in the center of me...and the chaos within me found balance."


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2005
    Location
    You must never go there, Simba.
    Posts
    3,449

    Default

    How old are you? What are you currently showing in? How big have you jumped? What does your trainer have you doing? Do you have the parental support competing at that level requires?

    I know you said you "have a ton saved up", but do you really have an idea about how much showing at that level costs?

    If you want to make it big, you'll need to show at one of the big winter circuits, preferably WEF. Can you compete there?

    As for bringing along a young horse, how much experience do you have doing that? Is your trainer onboard with bringing along a greenie?

    Just a few things to think about. Good luck.
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2005
    Location
    Where it is perpetually winter
    Posts
    4,982

    Default

    I'm going to give the OP the benefit of the doubt, which then means I have a novel to write.

    OP:
    You sound really young from your post, which is not a bad thing, but it's just an observation. From that, I think you need to take a lot of lessons, as many as you can. Get as much saddle time as you possibly can manage. Watch other people's lessons; you can learn so much about riding and teaching by watching. Watch the top professionals in the schooling ring at horse shows. Learn from mistakes, both the ones that you make and the ones you see other people make. Don't be afraid to make mistakes, as that's how you learn.

    Be a working student. Right now, I think you have rose-colored glasses on about the industry (which a lot of aspiring people have). This is a rough, rough industry to make a living in, even if you're the best rider in the world. You need to get perspective on that by working as hard as you can. Talk to riders, ask them how they got to where they are. Talk to grooms. Talk to barn managers. You need to learn as much as you can about every aspect of horse care because being a professional does not just mean riding. It means understanding all the little details and being able to adjust your program to make them come together. I think I know what area you're in, so if you PM me, I might be able to send you suggestions about who to contact.

    Be realistic about your goals. Most of us are not Reed Kessler and will not be going to the Olympics at 18. For that matter, most of us will never go to the Olympics, period. You can have lofty long-term goals, but make smaller, more attainable ones in the meantime. If you're currently showing at 1.40m, for example, set a goal like aiming for a clear round at 1.45m, or being double clear in a really technical class. Learn the metric conversions so your life is a little easier. Realize that it's not just about the height you have jumped, but whether you did a course of it and whether you did it well or if you just got from one side to the other. Getting to the International level and being competitive in the 1.60m classes takes a long, long time and a ton of work, not to mention some incredibly gifted horses. Set that as your long-term goal. Know that in the meantime, you have a lot of learning to do and a lot of blood, sweat, and tears that will go into it.

    Once you have more experience, do the Emerging Athletes Program. I'm thinking about Jacob Pope and the opportunities he's had as a result of the program, not to mention the opportunities he'll have going forward.

    You didn't mention anything about having a trainer, so if you don't, get one. You need insight from someone who is already in the industry (and you need to be taking lessons).

    Most importantly, go to college and get a degree. Regardless of who you are, it could take as little as one bad injury to have you out of the saddle for a long time or even forever. I would suggest a business degree so you can manage your accounts. Don't go to school for one of those "equine science" degrees.

    Sit on as many horses as you possibly can. Learn from all of them, whether it's a rank mustang who thinks that you belong in the dirt, a green pony who is concerned about the boogeymen hiding in the flowers at jumps, or the stereotypical schoolmaster who will teach you much of what you need to know. There is always a lesson you can take away from a horse, including learning when to say no to getting on something because it's dangerous.

    Say thank you. Be grateful. Appreciate the opportunities you get, the network connections you make, and the horses you get to work with.

    I really hope the OP is legitimate and not a troll, or this will be a long post gone to waste..


    38 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2012
    Location
    Somewhere down-under
    Posts
    152

    Default

    Spend every waking hour outside school or work in the saddle. Nothing compares to that.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2012
    Posts
    10

    Default

    .


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2012
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Oops. I'm 14, showing in Hunters and Jumpers, wanting to start EQ, Jumping 4'. I don't think i'm quite ready for that big of a show, but maybe soon?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    4,915

    Default

    Dreams are great – where to start? Find an excellent trainer who will take you on as a working student, preferably one that already has students at “the top”. Pay for the honor of working from 6am to 8pm daily.

    The horse isn’t going to get you to the top
    The shows aren’t going to get you to the top

    Lots of hours of sweat and work under the careful direction of a top trainer will get you to the top. That and spending a few hundred thousand dollars on horses and shows if you want to play in the big leagues (totally out of my league!)


    4 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2012
    Posts
    10

    Default

    Thanks!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2005
    Location
    You must never go there, Simba.
    Posts
    3,449

    Default

    Okay, but what "hunters, jumpers, and eq"? Junior Hunters, Junior Jumpers, Big Eq? Local stuff? What height? What divisions?

    What path has your trainer laid out for you? I assume you've talked to him/her about your goals - surely they have a plan in mind.

    How far have you brought a young horse? You've been training horses since you were 10? No offense, but I find that difficult to believe.

    I'm not trying to be discouraging, OP, but you've laid out a very ambitious goal - the Olympics in 4 years. There are millions of steps from 14 and showing at the locals to competing on an international level. I'm not saying it can't be done - but it will take some extraordinary effort on your part. Be prepared to be met with skepticism and criticism. And be honest with yourself and others about where you are now, and where you are every step along the way. Dreams and ambition are great, but be careful to keep your horses' wellbeing at the forefront of your plans.
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 14, 2012
    Posts
    10

    Default

    I've been showing juniors at B rated shows. I haven't yet, I really just wanted to be a pro. I have. I've brought my own horse to 3'3.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    Westchester County, NY
    Posts
    5,715

    Default

    Talk with your trainer about your goals. Ride every horse that is available, regardless of what it does/knows. Experience is important.

    As far as showing, talk with your trainer about a plan. None of us can tell what you are ready for without watching. The Big Eq might be a reasonable goal if you have the talent and horsepower.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2012
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    67

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by supershorty628 View Post
    I'm going to give the OP the benefit of the doubt, which then means I have a novel to write.

    OP:
    You sound really young from your post, which is not a bad thing, but it's just an observation. From that, I think you need to take a lot of lessons, as many as you can. Get as much saddle time as you possibly can manage. Watch other people's lessons; you can learn so much about riding and teaching by watching. Watch the top professionals in the schooling ring at horse shows. Learn from mistakes, both the ones that you make and the ones you see other people make. Don't be afraid to make mistakes, as that's how you learn.

    Be a working student. Right now, I think you have rose-colored glasses on about the industry (which a lot of aspiring people have). This is a rough, rough industry to make a living in, even if you're the best rider in the world. You need to get perspective on that by working as hard as you can. Talk to riders, ask them how they got to where they are. Talk to grooms. Talk to barn managers. You need to learn as much as you can about every aspect of horse care because being a professional does not just mean riding. It means understanding all the little details and being able to adjust your program to make them come together. I think I know what area you're in, so if you PM me, I might be able to send you suggestions about who to contact.

    Be realistic about your goals. Most of us are not Reed Kessler and will not be going to the Olympics at 18. For that matter, most of us will never go to the Olympics, period. You can have lofty long-term goals, but make smaller, more attainable ones in the meantime. If you're currently showing at 1.40m, for example, set a goal like aiming for a clear round at 1.45m, or being double clear in a really technical class. Learn the metric conversions so your life is a little easier. Realize that it's not just about the height you have jumped, but whether you did a course of it and whether you did it well or if you just got from one side to the other. Getting to the International level and being competitive in the 1.60m classes takes a long, long time and a ton of work, not to mention some incredibly gifted horses. Set that as your long-term goal. Know that in the meantime, you have a lot of learning to do and a lot of blood, sweat, and tears that will go into it.

    Once you have more experience, do the Emerging Athletes Program. I'm thinking about Jacob Pope and the opportunities he's had as a result of the program, not to mention the opportunities he'll have going forward.

    You didn't mention anything about having a trainer, so if you don't, get one. You need insight from someone who is already in the industry (and you need to be taking lessons).

    Most importantly, go to college and get a degree. Regardless of who you are, it could take as little as one bad injury to have you out of the saddle for a long time or even forever. I would suggest a business degree so you can manage your accounts. Don't go to school for one of those "equine science" degrees.

    Sit on as many horses as you possibly can. Learn from all of them, whether it's a rank mustang who thinks that you belong in the dirt, a green pony who is concerned about the boogeymen hiding in the flowers at jumps, or the stereotypical schoolmaster who will teach you much of what you need to know. There is always a lesson you can take away from a horse, including learning when to say no to getting on something because it's dangerous.

    Say thank you. Be grateful. Appreciate the opportunities you get, the network connections you make, and the horses you get to work with.

    I really hope the OP is legitimate and not a troll, or this will be a long post gone to waste..
    Supershorty, you are so nice! You write the most kind and encouraging posts to people. Its a refreshing change in the horse world where people are sometimes so mean.


    36 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2003
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    2,909

    Default

    In addition to riding as much as you can, and learning as much as you can, I'd suggest a field trip (maybe in the form of a family vacation) to some of the larger AA shows. WEF if you can afford it, or maybe Gulfport or anything at KHP, like Pony Finals, the USHJA Hunter Derby finals and the Alltech National Horse Show. You will see what the top horses look like, and see the top riders and trainers too.

    Talk to your trainer about showing opportunities. Start keeping a spreadsheet or some other record of what shows you went to, what classes you were in, and how you placed. If you were in a class with numerical scores, record those too. Discuss your scores and placings with your trainer, and ask for input on how to improve. If you got any catch rides, make a note of them, and how you placed. And thank the owner and trainer profusely for any catch ride opportunities.

    Learn how to groom, clip, wrap and braid. Understand that horses have thoughts and opinions and think about what works best with each individual horse. Work hard, have a good attitude. View problems as opportunities dressed in work clothes. And I don't know who said this, but it's very true, "the harder I work, the luckier I get."

    Good luck, enjoy the journey, and take time to hug your horses.
    It's 2014. Do you know where your old horse is?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2010
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    634

    Default

    ETA: Just kidding... I'm dumb.
    Proud member of the COTH Junior (and Junior-at-Heart!) clique!



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2009
    Location
    Four Corners
    Posts
    820

    Default

    Read "How Good Riders Get Good" by Denny Emerson. Don't dismiss it because he's an eventer and not in your chosen discipline. There's stuff in there that pertains to anyone who wants to be good.

    Also, go ahead and think big, but I think a lot of youngsters focus on riding as pros because they want a career with horses but can't think of any others, except maybe vet. There are other careers that will give you horse contact daily, and sometimes that's going to college and getting a better job to finance your horse habit


    5 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by pony4me View Post
    .

    Learn how to groom, clip, wrap and braid. Understand that horses have thoughts and opinions and think about what works best with each individual horse. Work hard, have a good attitude.
    I was just going to post "don't forget the horsemanship part". You can be a really good rider, but if you don't know the groundwork, you'll never be a really good trainer.
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
    Posts
    430

    Default So you want to run your own stable?

    Quote Originally Posted by equineobsession6 View Post
    Soo I want to be a professional hunter/jumper rider... where should I start? I don't really have to worry about money, I have a ton saved up. I have 2 horses and they have really helped me, but i'm looking for a younger horse to get me to the top. I'm switching to A rated next spring and will be trying to show at least once a month, hopefully more. What shows should I go to once i'm doing good at A shows? The biggest show by me is in Iowa and it's AA and theres one in the cities that has Grand Prix and it's A rated. Should I show in Jumpers, Hunters, and Eq.?

    Thank you(:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T4HRkAwN_oA


    5 members found this post helpful.

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