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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct. 24, 2000
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    Lake Norman, NC USA
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    646

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    One of my boarders told me she has me (as getting the horses) in her will with a life insurance policy to me to provide for the care of her horses. Hopefully the policy has enough $$. Fortunately they're good, easy horses and she's middle aged, so not likely to come up anytime soon.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by NorthwoodsRider View Post
    Really?? Are they older horses who no longer have quality of life ahead of them? I don't understand why you would put down young healthy horses instead of line up a suitable home for them.
    Currently, I have a 20 year old Arab and a 6 year old QH.

    I would rather euthanize them and know that they never moved on to an unsuitable or bad situation, then to allow them to live in a way that I would not approve of. I don't sell my horses either, for this reason. If I cannot ensure they have a good life with me, I will ensure they don't end up having a bad life with someone else. When I'm dead, I cannot ensure their health and happiness, and the only way to make sure they dont' end up in a bad way when I'm gone, is to take responsiblity for their humane end.

    All of my friends know this, as do my parents (where the horses are kept) so if some freak accident happened or I got ill and died unexpectedly, they know they are to euthanize the horses.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    40,629

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    Currently, I have a 20 year old Arab and a 6 year old QH.

    I would rather euthanize them and know that they never moved on to an unsuitable or bad situation, then to allow them to live in a way that I would not approve of. I don't sell my horses either, for this reason. If I cannot ensure they have a good life with me, I will ensure they don't end up having a bad life with someone else. When I'm dead, I cannot ensure their health and happiness, and the only way to make sure they dont' end up in a bad way when I'm gone, is to take responsiblity for their humane end.

    All of my friends know this, as do my parents (where the horses are kept) so if some freak accident happened or I got ill and died unexpectedly, they know they are to euthanize the horses.
    I am not sure that will hold in court.
    There have been precedents where someone died that wanted their animals, dogs, euthanized, afraid no one could care for them as she did and the judge didn't permit euthanizing, they were re-homed.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,152

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    No provisions; if I die suddenly I trust anyone in my family left behind to make good decisions about my animals, especially with my friend Kat's input which I'm sure would be part of the scenario if my DH was left behind. If all my dire predictions finally come true ("DH, you're going to get us all killed!!") the surviving horses would most likely be absorbed into the family or back to the homes they had before us.

    The critter that needs a provision is my goat Pigweed. If DH and kids have their way they'll serve goat stew at the wake!



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2010
    Location
    Newtown, CT
    Posts
    598

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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    Currently, I have a 20 year old Arab and a 6 year old QH.

    I would rather euthanize them and know that they never moved on to an unsuitable or bad situation, then to allow them to live in a way that I would not approve of. I don't sell my horses either, for this reason. If I cannot ensure they have a good life with me, I will ensure they don't end up having a bad life with someone else. When I'm dead, I cannot ensure their health and happiness, and the only way to make sure they dont' end up in a bad way when I'm gone, is to take responsiblity for their humane end.

    All of my friends know this, as do my parents (where the horses are kept) so if some freak accident happened or I got ill and died unexpectedly, they know they are to euthanize the horses.
    Hmmm...While I understand that you just want what's best for your horses, I would never want them euthanized just because I wasn't their owner. I guess we have a very different perspective.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
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    15,179

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    Quote Originally Posted by kdow View Post

    What happens with a trust if the person named to take it on is unable to do so when it comes time?
    When you create a trust, you name more than one trustee, usually who take power in succession.

    In my case, I'll name two trustees who must make decisions jointly; and if one can't do the job it will go to the other.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  7. #27
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by showidaho View Post

    As to the Legal Zoom vs. a lawyer. I met with an attorney who wanted $4000 to setup my will and trust?!?!?! I told her that was really high! I met with another lawyer who wanted around he same - mostly they said it was super complicated because of the dang horses. That sounded ridiculous to me and an attorney friend told us that the Legal Zoom will and trust would work just as well? Should I use legal zoom and then have an attorney review it? Is that even an option? I don't want to cheap out and then regret it later, but we are talking thousands of dollars for *theoretically* the same product...And Legal Zoom has lawyers on hand who go over everything with customers, or at least that is the point I've reached in the process.
    As I understand it, a will can be a relatively simple document, so perhaps you can use Legal Zoom to create that. Trusts are more complicated and that's why you need a lawyer to draft it.

    I have lived in several states, so I keep my eyes peeled for the problem of jurisdiction. How do I create a set of documents that will work in all 50 states? Hmm...

    If you do plan to live in your state for the duration, your money with an attorney there will be money well spent.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  8. #28
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by showidaho View Post
    Hmmm...While I understand that you just want what's best for your horses, I would never want them euthanized just because I wasn't their owner. I guess we have a very different perspective.

    This can be a toughie for even one person. So, for example, I know what I'd want for my current horse-- a semi-retired 19 year old gelding. What if I owned an 8 year old high-performing mare by the time I died? Would I dictate the same terms for her? Would I want to dedicate enough money to the trust in order to feed her for an additional 20 years when it would be reasonable to expect that she might be sold to a great home?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  9. #29
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post

    The critter that needs a provision is my goat Pigweed. If DH and kids have their way they'll serve goat stew at the wake!

    May I suggest that you form The Pigweed Trust? It sounds good, and it might solve all of your problems, including discouraging your DH from doing dumb things that could kill you. No point in assassinating you for the money when it all goes to keeping a goat in alfalfa.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 2005
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    1,074

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    Agh, this is something that I need to do. We just did annual benefits enrollment at work and I did an additional multiple for life insurance (less than a dollar a paycheck) with the intention it be for the horse, but I've got to get that figured out in writing.

    The financial vehicle I work in does not go through probate. We once paid Crackers the Parrot (I guess it was fairly complicated to figure out who could sign on behalf of Crackers)



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2012
    Posts
    82

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    I didn't read alll post but from experience do a trust!

    Rescued 2 horses from very bad situations when the "best friend guardian" own personal circumstances changed.
    Both situations were not expected and thus ill-prepared.

    The one guardian developed a mental illness;became maniac and spent all the money.

    The other situation the guardian died suddenly in car accident and surviving family members unloaded the horses and never looked back.



  12. #32
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by abrant View Post
    The financial vehicle I work in does not go through probate. We once paid Crackers the Parrot (I guess it was fairly complicated to figure out who could sign on behalf of Crackers)
    You probably did, and don't laugh. The Parrot People have thought hard about this because those suckers live 70 years.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2010
    Location
    Newtown, CT
    Posts
    598

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    MVP - great advice. We are not here permanently (well, I guess you never really know, but we don't think we are anyway).

    I love the joint executor/trustee idea. This is one of the more stressful decisions I've had to make - gosh I don't know how people do this for their kids! I'm in a frenzy about the horses!

    How do you choose the right person to facilitate your wishes after death? I have some great choices, but they are all older than me and while I know they are the best choices, it seems like such an incredible burden. Although, after further discussion (and suggestion from this board) hubby and I will setup a fund to pay the poor sap(s) who get stuck with the boys. And we will have to keep updating this document...Responsibility has it's downfalls.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug. 1, 2002
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    6,164

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    Nothing in writing, but Chocomare and I are in agreement that if something should happen to one of us, the other will care for her horses.



  15. #35
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    I am not sure that will hold in court.
    There have been precedents where someone died that wanted their animals, dogs, euthanized, afraid no one could care for them as she did and the judge didn't permit euthanizing, they were re-homed.
    I would imagine it would only be an issue if the person that I leave responsible for the deed had an issue with it and refused (thereby opening up legal issues with my will) or if the vet that would be used refused to euthanize healthy animals.

    The people responsible for the horses should I die are not against it, and are in 100% agreement with my choice, and the vet doesn't have an issue with it either.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  16. #36
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by showidaho View Post
    Hmmm...While I understand that you just want what's best for your horses, I would never want them euthanized just because I wasn't their owner. I guess we have a very different perspective.
    Guess so.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    I would imagine it would only be an issue if the person that I leave responsible for the deed had an issue with it and refused (thereby opening up legal issues with my will) or if the vet that would be used refused to euthanize healthy animals.

    The people responsible for the horses should I die are not against it, and are in 100% agreement with my choice, and the vet doesn't have an issue with it either.
    One case in CA I know about, best I remember now, involved an animal rights group suing for the dogs, so they would not be euthanized, just because the deceased owner determined that to be so.

    I think they wanted to make a precedent out of that case, but it was finally settled out of court, the estate found homes for them.

    I still would be sure to get everyone on board with such terminal requests for your animals and hope no one else but those involved find about those wishes and tries to stop them from happening.



  18. #38
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    I still would be sure to get everyone on board with such terminal requests for your animals and hope no one else but those involved find about those wishes and tries to stop them from happening.
    Yep, the people who need to know, know, and the action will be taken immediately following my death.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
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    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    May I suggest that you form The Pigweed Trust? It sounds good, and it might solve all of your problems, including discouraging your DH from doing dumb things that could kill you. No point in assassinating you for the money when it all goes to keeping a goat in alfalfa.
    I hate to think how Pigweed's behavior would decline if he found out about the Pigweed Provision! I think fear of death is the only thing that keeps him remotely tolerable right now. Though I guess I should weigh my own safety in the equation too. Food for thought.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jul. 3, 2012
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    2,110

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    My horses are left to my daughter...verbally and legally. I went so far as to having her name put on the registration papers, along with mine and DH's to make assumption of ownership easier. I'm fortunate in that she loves them and they have a home for life with her. I have promised my western horse's first mom that he will go back to her if need be. Also, my dog has a home for life with darling daughter. And there will be enough money to care for them all.

    Both of them live on her farm and we've been horse buds since she was able to ride. Horses are our joint recreation.



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