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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2008
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    Michigan
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    I teach my horses to tie so I don't need bailing twine. I will admit that the tb's have been harder to train to tie then the QH's and arabs. It is like the tb's come with the automatic button to pull back when tied. Although, I do have a few good tb's that will tie to the trailer all day long. That helps when I go to a show or trail riding by myself. It is not to much to ask the horse to behave and stand tied like they are suppose to.

    My first horse was an arab mare, I had her for 15 years and taught her to tie to everything without freaking out. Why? Because we would go camping and I would expect her to stand tied to the picket line all night so she wouldn't get loose and lost in the thousands of acres of woods. Even if my reins fell and she stepped on them with a bit in her mouth she would drop her head to the ground until I came to the rescue. Lots of time and trust into that mare.

    There is a local gentleman that lost his horse in the woods because she broke her tie. They found her dead in a bog which is a dried up lake. It was like quicksand and she couldn't get out. Found her almost a year after she went missing.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2009
    Location
    Kentucky
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    145

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    I have always been of the "tie hard and fast" school. I don't want my horses ever learning that breaking loose is an option when things don't go their way. I also expect them to be there when I get back. What's the point of tieing if you can't be more than 30 yards away? That said, not all horses can be trusted or fixed, ever. I owned one, and he never pulled back out of fear. He knew exactly what he was doing every time, and I literally could not find a rig he couldn't break. I can't tell you how many times I had to chase him down, potentially putting other horses and people in danger. In the end he was either in hand, or in the trailer. Breaking loose was a game for him. I think it's important to realize that horses pull back for two different reasons, either honest fear/lack of training, or just plain nasty behavior. Fear can be fixed, an intelligent, strong horse with a nasty attitude usually can't. Unfortunately this horse learned how big he was, and didn't give crap how bad he hurt himself in the process. He was a tough horse and in his mind, the pain of pulling back was worth it. Which I why I am even more careful now to tie hard and fast. I don't ever want to have another horse learn that trick! An ounce of prevention, so to speak.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2009
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    549

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    Doesnt anyone tie with a quick release knot anymore??? Solves all these problems. Still a hard and fast knot- but SUPER easy to QUICKLY RELEASE in an emergency.
    Last edited by DeucesWild11; Nov. 15, 2012 at 08:33 AM. Reason: Spelling mistake- thanks OCD.. :)


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24

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    DeucesWild,

    Even with a quick release not, it's possible for it to get jammed if the horse has pulled hard against it while freaking out about something. But yes, that's what I use.
    The Trials and Jubilations of a Twenty-Something Re-rider
    Happy owner of Kieran the mostly-white-very-large-not-pony.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
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    Rising Sun, MD
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    3,472

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeucesWild11 View Post
    Doesnt anyone tie with a quick release knot anymore??? Solves all these problems. Still a hard and fast knot- but SUPER easy to QUICKLY RELEASE in an emergency.
    I was assuming tie hard and fast meant with a quick release knot, at least that's what my tie hard and fast means.
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
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    8,427

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    Quote Originally Posted by pony grandma View Post
    WhyI have made my own lead ropes with panic snaps.

    And always have a breakaway halter.

    And a sharp knife in the trailer (and the barn).
    Supplements to the above:

    Add a "rubber donut" (made from a bicycle inner tube) to you "tie line." It will absorb a lot shock and prevent that shock from causing the "break away" to break.

    Keep a sharp knife in your pocket or on your belt. If you've got a panicked horse do you have time to be rummaging around the trailer or the barn looking for your blade?

    Make sure your panic snap is not on the halter end of the lead rope. In line is probably best. Ensure that the snap is rigged such that you actuate it by pulling away from the horse. Query: have you ever tried to release a panic snap under pressure? Try it sometime with a human simulating a pulling back horse. I did and it was not a rousing success. Keep the panic snaps lubricated so that metal will glide against metal. Even then poorly designed or made snaps might not work.

    Use good quality materials when you tie your horse. The "el cheapo" halters and lead ropes from TS will likely not handle the gaff.

    Tom Stovall wrote some time back that he was the show farrier at an event in Houston when a horse got loose. It ran down a youngster in stroller, causing catastrophic injury to the child. This is a risk I will NOT accept. Better 100 ganted up horses than one paraplegic kid.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    Apr. 6, 2006
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    Plainview, MN
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    Quote Originally Posted by LookmaNohands View Post
    I have been to a few hundred shows and events over the years. I have seen dozens and dozens of loose horses. Some of them pulled back, some of them lost their riders some of them got loose other ways. I know of only one horse that got ever got hurt. It was an advanced level horse whose rider fell off and the horse ran loose for 15 or 20 minutes before he was caught--he bowed a tendon.
    Then I would count you as very fortunate. I have seen loose horses at shows:
    Get into a hidden downed fence in long grass and sever a tendon in their foreleg, as I already mentioned. That was awful, happened to a horse at a barn I worked at, she was in a cast for months and to this day can not be ridden and has to be stalled with limited turn out in a small space.
    Get on to roads/highways (multiple times).
    Get into the warm-up area and cause other riders to be dumped.
    Get amongst other horses tied to someone else's trailer and start a kicking fight.
    Run into the crowd (a police horse got loose at the Minnesota State Fair while being led back to the barn for the night a few years ago, ran into the midway area and knocked down and injured several people).
    Run into the parking lot, saw one horse smash a windshield trying to jump over a car, saw another pony on a different occasion fall and slide under a car.
    So again if you have never seen loose horses at an event (show, expo, trail ride, etc.) cause damage to themselves, other horses, people, or property count yourself very, very lucky.


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  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2006
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    1,108

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    I do have a horse that will pull back. My daughter's morgan came that way. He's much better but if the wrong person approaches him in the wrong manner, he will fly back. He is ALWAYS tied high and tight, with a NON breakable halter. He will pull back, scramble,hop forward and then stop. Because he's tied high,tight and with an unbreakable halter, he stops. If he was tied with twine or a breakaway halter, he'd not only be loose, he'd have learned that the more he pulls, the quicker he gets free. He's much better after 4 years of being tied this way, his tied shenanigans happen much less often.
    Kerri


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
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    Nokesville, VA
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    35,064

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    Quote Originally Posted by tabula rashah View Post
    I am also firmly in the camp of NO bailing twine.
    ... for example I was out on the trail one day by myself with my then 4 year old, recently started mare. We went through some fallen leaves and she stepped in some barbed wire hidden under the leaves. She stopped instantly and waited for me to get down and fix it. Had she panicked, her legs would have been shreds.
    I have had EXACTLY the same experience with my horses that are ALWAYS tied to baling twine, with breakaway halters.

    I think you are mistaking cause and effect.
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2008
    Location
    Michigan
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    1,418

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    for me.. it depends on the horse

    I hard tie my long ears for long periods of time, in any environment, with any kind of tie, at any length (within reason) with no problems

    I will hard tie the Mustang, but, only under supervision, and with a quick release available

    but... my TB, never gets "hard tied" to ANYTHING, ever, and is always under supervision

    moral of the story: my long ears are SMART when it comes to life (especially their own) and are always thinking first, reacting later. my Mustang is highly adaptable and will usually give warning of impending danger, and can actually learn something even while panicking........ My TB can be ALL react, and NO thinky.. and will kill herself in a split second with no hope of rescuing her from her situation.... been through horrible tie scenarios with her 2 times, not going there again, ever.... sigh...

    this system just works for us...

    either way though we always tie high. for the TB just laying the rope over something high is enough to hold her place.. she thinks she is tied. and for the most part, stands there very nicely, but, there is always that slim chance of unrecoverable panic with her.

    I really like those blocker tie rings for my TB

    we also dont tie in the trailer, but, we have a big stock trailer

    we also use leather halters on everybody



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2000
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    Nokesville, VA
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    Quote Originally Posted by sunridge1 View Post
    ...
    Have I made myself clear? YOU CAN NEVER TRUST A CONFIRMED HALTER PULLER. They can tie perfect 99 out of 100 times, it's that one time that is worrisome.
    I will agree with that. But I strongly disagree with your suggestion not to tie to baling twine.

    But the ONLY confirmed "halter puller" I have had was MADE THAT WAY by being tied to something SOLID.

    When he was a 3 yo (long before I got him) he was tied to the post of a post and rail fence (through the hole in the post). Something spooked him, and he pulled and pulled until he pulled the post OUT OF THE GROUND. He then proceded to gallop around the property for half an hour, dragging the post between his legs.

    Ten years later, when I got him, he still had scars on his belly, and he still didn't tie.

    I eventually (USING BALING TWINE) got him to the point where he would stand tied (to baling twine) MOST of the time. But he was never 100%.

    If he had originally been tied using baling twine, they would have had a loose 3 yo.

    Becuase they tied him directly to the post, they had a seriously injured, badly traumatized, loose 3 yo, who would not tie.

    Do you REALLY think that was preferable?
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
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    Rising Sun, MD
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janet View Post
    I will agree with that. But I strongly disagree with your suggestion not to tie to baling twine.

    But the ONLY confirmed "halter puller" I have had was MADE THAT WAY by being tied to something SOLID.

    When he was a 3 yo (long before I got him) he was tied to the post of a post and rail fence (through the hole in the post). Something spooked him, and he pulled and pulled until he pulled the post OUT OF THE GROUND. He then proceded to gallop around the property for half an hour, dragging the post between his legs.

    Ten years later, when I got him, he still had scars on his belly, and he still didn't tie.

    I eventually (USING BALING TWINE) got him to the point where he would stand tied (to baling twine) MOST of the time. But he was never 100%.

    If he had originally been tied using baling twine, they would have had a loose 3 yo.

    Becuase they tied him directly to the post, they had a seriously injured, badly traumatized, loose 3 yo, who would not tie.

    Do you REALLY think that was preferable?

    No, he should have been properly taught long before 3 how to tie correctly and then he shouldn't have been tied to something that could be pulled out of the ground (esp if he didn't know how to tie).

    Me thinks you mistake cause and effect
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  13. #33
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    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Janet View Post
    I will agree with that. But I strongly disagree with your suggestion not to tie to baling twine.

    But the ONLY confirmed "halter puller" I have had was MADE THAT WAY by being tied to something SOLID.

    When he was a 3 yo (long before I got him) he was tied to the post of a post and rail fence (through the hole in the post). Something spooked him, and he pulled and pulled until he pulled the post OUT OF THE GROUND. He then proceded to gallop around the property for half an hour, dragging the post between his legs.

    Ten years later, when I got him, he still had scars on his belly, and he still didn't tie.

    I eventually (USING BALING TWINE) got him to the point where he would stand tied (to baling twine) MOST of the time. But he was never 100%.

    If he had originally been tied using baling twine, they would have had a loose 3 yo.

    Becuase they tied him directly to the post, they had a seriously injured, badly traumatized, loose 3 yo, who would not tie.

    Do you REALLY think that was preferable?
    Well, you have to tie solid to something, well, solid.

    Just because someone was not thinking and the horse got loose and in big trouble, that doesn't mean tying solid is not a very good idea.

    Of course tying to something a horse can pull out of the ground is NOT tying solid, any more than tying with a baling wire.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
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    Nov. 24, 2006
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    1,108

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    Tying to something that can be pulled is idiotic. Accident waiting to happen, which, well, happened.
    Kerri


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  15. #35
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
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    I always tie my horse with baling twine and a leather halter.

    HOWEVER, my horse is respectful of pressure, doesn't pull back, and I NEVER leave her unsupervised while tied - especially to the trailer!!

    I also know how to tie properly with the right amount of slack. It makes me crazy to see people tie horses to their trailer with the rope too long. Personally I don't want my trailer damaged either because my horse got the rope caught on something.

    The ONLY time my horse did pull back was due to my own stupidity. And her leather halter broke before the twine did. (I got mad at her because she wouldn't back out of the trailer - not realizing that I forgot to untie her. So she did what I asked and backed up. And broke her beautiful leather halter. Yes, I am a dumb ass!)



  16. #36
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    Apr. 28, 2004
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    Saratoga Springs, NY
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    And once again we're back to: what works for one horse won't work for all. I have a few I could hard tie to the trailer and leave for hours, no biggie. I've had some that ground tie but panic if tied. Others that I don't trust, have had bad experiences, are young and still learning, they get tied appropriate to the situation (whether it's home or away, quiet or busy, etc) but it's far from one-size-fits-all. And in the interest of public safety, my horse's safety and my own peace of mind, I teach them all how to load really well so away from home they can just hop in the trailer if they can't be supervised. But we all know that with horses, there is never any 1 'pperfect' way of doing anything, including tying.
    Different Times Equestrian Ventures at Hidden Spring Ranch
    www.DifferentTimesEquestrianVentures.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
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    between the barn and the pond
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    At an AQHA show I witnessed a mare tied with a too lope rope, get her foreleg over it and panic. She flung herself backwards, got untangled, but then launched herself forward and up- her forelegs scrambling on the roof of the trailer- when she fell back, the halter broke and she took off up the gravel drive toward the parking lot- blindly running over a guy who tried to wave her down with his hat- she spun him like a top. Me, I just got out of her way.

    Everyone has to do what works for them, so a blanket PSA is not going to work. The It Depends rule prevails (thinking of my friend's aged polo mare with a sketchy past who will not hard tie, she'd die fighting. But she'll ground tie ALL day at a polo meet, snoozing beside her trailer, unmoving).



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2012
    Location
    Washington State
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    I am curious for those that always use baling twine to tie, what is it made out of? The stuff that we have is some kind of plasticky material that does. not. break. It has not broken before the halter at any time that the pony has had a panic episode, which thankfully now are few and far between.

    Our halters are nice quality leather and we used to tie with slip-knots (sometimes they didn't slip). She came with this issue and we are working on it, but it's going to be a lifelong deal with her. We now, never leave her unattended when tied and always watch her for signs of impending freak out. If we can stop it before it starts with a forward cue all is well.



  19. #39
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    Aug. 11, 2003
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    The definition of solid is also interesting. An Oak tree is solid but I can't think of much more. I had my TB mare on the cross ties in my wash rack, clipped at one side only. Poles were 4 x 4s cemented into the wash rack. Mare flipped out and SNAPPED the 4x4, then took off with the damn post smashing around her legs. Thankfully she was good enough to realise it was a dumb move and stopped for me to disconnect the pole. The cross tie didn't break and the halter didn't break. I would have previously thought that a 4x4 was "solid".



  20. #40
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    Aug. 11, 2003
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    For those that are firmly anti-baling twine, are you also firmly against leather halters and breakaway halters?



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