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  1. #41
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    Jan. 2, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Given the LTLH I think that would be a mistake
    JB- I'm curious as to the reasoning behind why it would be a mistake to take a LTLH horse (or maybe just this one) barefoot? Can you explain? Thanks!



  2. #42
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    Thank you for your thoughts, all. FWIW, the farrier does set the shoe back further from the toe. When he is done shoeing him, there is definitely toe over the front of the shoe (both sides, but on the LF more). He wears that excess toe off almost immediately. In looking back at these photos, I think they may have been taken a week after his last shoeing (not a day, as I previously thought), because it looks like he has already worn the toe down quite a bit.

    I do know that the shoe is NEVER flush with the front of his toe right after a trim. It just seems to gradually wear back to the shoe...and then starts wearing the shoe itself, if that makes sense. The keg shoes were also set back, probably further than the natural balance type shoes, actually, but he was just not comfortable in them. He was not lame, but he wasn't moving well in front either.

    I think I will talk to my farrier about setting the current type of shoe back more at the next trim. I'm hesitant to start wedging him and putting him in bar shoes, etc., largely because he is a sensitive horse that often has strong negative opinions and reactions to things that seem like they would be "better" for him. That, and I was advised by the lameness specialist/surgeon that treated his suspensory injury that he should never, ever be wedged. I just don't want to make a lot of very drastic changes to the shoeing on a tricky horse that is presently sound with his feet as they are and is just having an unusual wear pattern. I'm all for getting him to the best place possible with his feet, but I think the best way to approach that is by small gradual changes until we find what works best.

    I also think there is a really good chance that the hock injections will help or completely fix the toe wear problem, along with setting the shoes back more and bringing the breakover back...which I agree should be done regardless of the wear pattern.



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
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    5,197

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    My LTLH Arab was barefoot until he was 5 when he only needed shoes due to me riding on horse-eating gravel a lot. He was fine. Put in the work early on, as in learn to rasp the toes back yourself every week, and you'll be just fine. It's not that difficult and any good farrier should be willing to show you how to keep the toes maintained between regular appointments, which should be about every 4 weeks. My boy is harder to maintain in shoes than he was barefoot because I could keep the growth even more frequently.



  4. #44
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    Oh, and to the extent anyone is interested, he is shod at 4 week intervals in the summer and 5-6 weeks in winter. He doesn't grow nearly as much hoof in the winter. In the summer, 4 weeks is sometimes almost pushing against being too long between cycles.



  5. #45
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by vtshale View Post
    JB- I'm curious as to the reasoning behind why it would be a mistake to take a LTLH horse (or maybe just this one) barefoot? Can you explain? Thanks!
    Usually, the LTLH horse also has a stretched, thin sole, and/or a stretched white line, and that does not often work well without shoes.

    CAN it work with a given horse? Yes. I personally think doing it isn't the best idea until you've gotten the hoof in better shape, because the horse has a high chance of being very sore. I've been there, did that, though to be fair I didn't have a whole lot of options at the time: I couldn't find a farrier I trusted when we moved, so with help, I get the shoes pulled and learned how to trim. I used boots a lot.
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  6. #46
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    Jan. 2, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by JB View Post
    Usually, the LTLH horse also has a stretched, thin sole, and/or a stretched white line, and that does not often work well without shoes.

    CAN it work with a given horse? Yes. I personally think doing it isn't the best idea until you've gotten the hoof in better shape, because the horse has a high chance of being very sore. I've been there, did that, though to be fair I didn't have a whole lot of options at the time: I couldn't find a farrier I trusted when we moved, so with help, I get the shoes pulled and learned how to trim. I used boots a lot.
    Thanks JB- that makes perfect sense! FWIW- I have tried casting with my thin-soled TB and so far she's doing GREAT in them! Much better than in boots, for some reason (I tried hoofwings).


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