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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2002
    Location
    Canada!!
    Posts
    272

    Question When do you really need fancy movement?

    So I have this pinto cob mare. I love her to bits, she is super cute, sweet, simple and although lazy, she tries her little heart out. She's flashy, but not fancy. I bought her because of how well she uses her hind end. She drives herself up infront. But she doesn't have much reach in the front end. I bought her as a little all-around'er and I knew she'd never be a big time DQ but she is giving the indication that she will be easy as pie to ride, smooth gaits and fairly strong technical correctness, but not fancy.

    So she had me asking myself how far one can go without fancy. What do you think? If you have a tidy horse and a correct rider, that has accuracy, nice push from the hind end, tracking up/over tracking into balanced gaits, soft into the bridle, etc, when will you no longer be competitive without a big mover?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
    Location
    Triangle Area, NC
    Posts
    6,709

    Default

    Never.... I mean, if physically capable you'll get to GP, you just may not be competitive beyond regional recognition.

    I have a horse with amazing sit, but he's not built to throw that front end out there. Doesn't bother me! He has an extended trot, it just doesn't look like superman
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2011
    Posts
    539

    Default

    Depends on where you are. If you, like me, are in a relatively light dressage area, you can probably do pretty well-- especially at the upper levels, where there are few horses and thus an accurate and correct test wins. If you're in a hotspot for dressage, not so much. Wherever you go, "fancy" is going to be harder to beat at the lower levels when there are fewer moments for training to shine (I'm looking at you, Training Level).

    If you're setting your sights on international competition... maybe not so much. Regional championships may be the same story, as well, depending on your region.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2003
    Location
    Wet and Windy Washington
    Posts
    3,780

    Default

    Agree never.

    A good solid, accurate ride should always be competitive.
    I have horse to sell to you. Horse good for riding. Can pull cart. Horse good size. Eats carrots and apples. Likes attention. Move head to music. No like opera! You like you buy.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2002
    Location
    Canada!!
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    272

    Default

    On an unrelated note - I just snooped your website and love Paul Belasik, I'm jealous you've ridden with him! One of my favourite quotes is his; 'Riding is feeling'.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,234

    Default

    It really depends on your goals to be totally honest. As others have said if you want to be of international fame, well, let's face it, fancy is necessary. If you simply want to enjoy the journey and see how far you can train, then the sky's the limit. In the states we have many different award programs which allow many to experience some success and satisfaction even with the not so fancy types. I've managed to earn my silver medal (competed through Prix St. George) with a welsh cob who possesses a great hind end and heart but not so much going for him in regards to the rest of his conformation. I've been able to win All-Breeds awards, highpoint trophies, GMO year end awards for HOY and so-on. I'm older now, married with two kids who are almost grown and have a full-time job. International fame was never in the cards for me nor has it ever been my interest; but, that makes me no less serious about my riding. Give me a good heart, great engine and willing work ethic over fancy in a equine package any day. It's that which has aloud this amateur to enjoy the journey. Good luck with you and yours, she sounds quite nice
    Ranch of Last Resort
    www.annwylid.com


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2007
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    Triangle Area, NC
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Corky View Post
    On an unrelated note - I just snooped your website and love Paul Belasik, I'm jealous you've ridden with him! One of my favourite quotes is his; 'Riding is feeling'.
    When I was talking to his assistant Andrea about horse shopping, she said fancy movement is way low on her list.
    If you ever have the opportunity to ride with Paul or even audit, you won't regret it! Andrea does some pretty neat clinic series too.
    www.destinationconsensusequus.com
    chaque pas est fait ensemble



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