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View Poll Results: What kind of traction devices do you use in the winter?

Voters
30. You may not vote on this poll
  • None

    8 26.67%
  • Removeable screw-in studs

    7 23.33%
  • Non-removeable drive-in studs

    8 26.67%
  • Welded on borium or drilltek

    7 23.33%
  • Other (please elaborate)

    0 0%
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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 8, 2007
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    Maryland
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    1,304

    Default What kind of traction device do you use in the winter?

    The question about studs got me wondering... how many people use removable studs for hunting in the wintertime? I didn't think it was that common but it seems I was mistaken!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2008
    Location
    The beautiful midwest
    Posts
    752

    Default Barefoot is best

    We pull shoes late fall/early winter depending on how long we can get away with it. We have a long walk across an icy parking lot to get to our indoor and have found this works the best. Our farrier thinks its good for our horses' feet to have the break too. We trail ride and play in the snow, but do not hunt. Way back when I did, centuries ago, we used borium studs.
    Lilykoi


    Hell hath no fury like the chestnut thoroughbred mare



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 1999
    Location
    WV
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    2,066

    Default

    I am a screw-in stud girl. Perhaps the eventer in me is what prefers the flexibility of what studs I use and I don't like having my horses turned out in traction 24x7. But, I also boot my horses to hunt and am conscientious about removing studs right after hunting. I don't like trailering in them, if I don't have to...but I use shipping boots.
    One thing you can give and still keep is your word.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2013
    Location
    Kansas City
    Posts
    950

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KateDB View Post
    I am a screw-in stud girl. Perhaps the eventer in me is what prefers the flexibility of what studs I use and I don't like having my horses turned out in traction 24x7. But, I also boot my horses to hunt and am conscientious about removing studs right after hunting. I don't like trailering in them, if I don't have to...but I use shipping boots.
    Yes, this. My farrier feels that constant grab is hard on the joints.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2009
    Posts
    2,053

    Default

    Borium or small drive in studs. (I prefer borium.) I've toyed with the idea of studs, but it's too much hassle for hunting, for me at least. If I hunted a horse that already was shod for studs I would certainly put studs in. While I have no problem with trail riding a barefoot horse in the winter, I think that hunting the average horse barefoot is very unrealistic. I'm sure there are horses (and certainly ponies) out there that could do it, but not the average horse. I have never had an issue turning horses out with borium.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2006
    Location
    Coastal New England
    Posts
    469

    Default

    Non-removable drive-in studs here. I don't hunt in the winter either (our hunting season ends before winter really sets in) but I do ride and we do deal with a LOT of ice. My horse does not do well without shoes. She's sound, but she works hard enough that her feet tend to wear down very short without some protection.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,415

    Default

    Removable screw-in. I don't want the constant traction on their joints.

    I guess it depends on the territory - here some sort of traction is advisable.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    10,151

    Default

    My mare stays barefoot and does fine on frozen, hard ground but I am a second flight/hilltop rider so not going at break neck speed or jumping.

    Many members at my hunt who hunt twice a week with shod horses tend to go with borium at three points on front shoes. One member recently told me if she doesn't loose a shoe the pair will last all hunt season. She prefers shoes with borium over borium tipped nails.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 16, 2012
    Posts
    214

    Default

    I use screw-in studs that I install and remove on the day I hunt. Two of my hunters are barefoot behind so have studs in front. Two are shod all around. Of these, one uses hind studs only, the other uses them all the way around.

    In every case, I just use small hexagonal road studs - no points.

    Works for my small, clever ponies.



  10. #10
    gypsymare is offline Fox Hunter Premium Member
    Original Poster
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    Jul. 8, 2007
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    Maryland
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    Default

    Does everyone who uses screw ins put them in at the fixture or trailer with them in?



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jan. 19, 2009
    Posts
    684

    Default

    I use studs and put them in at home before I trailer to the fixture. My guy gets a little up once we get there, and I don't want to mess with putting studs in while he's less than 100% calm.

    This was the first year I used studs, and I made the mistake of asking about trailering with them in on the eventing forum Apparently it's not typically done in the eventing world, but most foxhunters chimed in and said it worked for them.

    I think the difference is that the eventers are studding based on the footing once they get there, and may be using bigger studs, especially on the hinds. If I was doing that, I wouldn't be comfortable trailering with them either.

    Like most others, I am using road studs. There was one hunt last year that I wish I had put in more - it was icy and slippery, but for everything else the road studs have been fine.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 1999
    Location
    WV
    Posts
    2,066

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsymare View Post
    Does everyone who uses screw ins put them in at the fixture or trailer with them in?
    It depends really. Depends which horse I'm hunting, what fixture we are going to, how long the drive is before hand, whether I am alone or HB is with me....
    For a typical Thursday, for instance, I would put them in at home, put on galloping boots and then shipping boots - especially for Skipjack, since she is such a pill and also petite enough that I can fit all that on her legs!
    For Paddy/Clifford, studs and shipping boots, put galloping boots on there.
    When parking along the road, I definitely have to put studs in at home, but if in a field where I have room to tie to the trailer, I might put them on there.
    For instance, there is a very steep hill (with which you are familiar) for which I prefer not to be studded in the trailer, but to put them on when I arrive. I don't want someone scrambling and slicing themselves going down that lane!!!
    I investigated these really cool "guards" that slipped on over the horseshoe and studs. They ensured the horse stood level in the trailer and they made the studs recessed. I thought they were pretty pricey and actually they are made for horses wearing REALLY big studs, not the smaller road or ice studs I mostly use for hunting.
    One thing you can give and still keep is your word.



  13. #13
    gypsymare is offline Fox Hunter Premium Member
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    Maryland
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    Default

    Yes, I know that hill!! I've been using small drive-ins but it sure would be nice to have the option of putting in some bigger studs on deep, sloppy days. Al is a bit of a goober though and I don't think I want to mess with cleaning out and screwing in those 8 studs in the wee hours of the morning in my driveway. Maybe after I get the barn built!



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
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    22,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gypsymare View Post
    Does everyone who uses screw ins put them in at the fixture or trailer with them in?
    Trailer with them. And the horse is fully tacked with a sheet/blanket as needed.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2011
    Posts
    206

    Default

    I hunt first flight barefoot.

    I know my horse is a freak of nature (she also doesn't grow much foot, so she goes all winter without a trim), but i've never felt insecure in all conditions (including tarmac, frozen fields, tight turns after coops, etc.)

    Aside from being very light on my wallet, I also never have to worry about going in early



  16. #16
    gypsymare is offline Fox Hunter Premium Member
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    Maryland
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    Default

    My TB fell flat out on his side when he slipped on a leaf covered wooden bridge. I had pulled his hinds because his feet were growing so fast. Now I'm nervous about hunting him until I get them back on. It was also dicey going on deeply washed out trails through the woods where there's no good level footing. It felt like he was really floundering around behind.

    Luckily neither of us were hurt.

    I took my barefoot Paint mare out for hound exercise and was very happy she was barefoot through the Swamps of Sadness!!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2002
    Location
    Canada!!
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    272

    Default

    My first choice is always barefoot, if the horse can handle it. Cheaper, great traction for most horses and is just so darn simple. Sometimes you just don't mess with perfection I also really hate the horses standing on ice/snow balled up in their shoes since that has to be so uncomfortable.

    If the horse needs shoes, I'll try fronts first but as soon as I put shoes on I use drive-in non-slip tiny studs for traction on concrete, pavement etc and on very hard/dry ground. Its very important to me that they are the non-slip studs for concrete.

    If I am concerned about the horse needing a bigger stud for some reason I'd just leave in a very small screw-in style and just check it and be ready with spares as needed.

    For the small studs I trailer with them in, of course, since they are usually drive-in. If they were a bigger stud or I had a silly horse I'd use bell boots and a galloping boot on the trailer. Easier and better protection then those silly shipping boots and much easier to wash. I'd avoid hunting in boots unless it was an absolutely necessity however.

    I only use hind shoes if the horse really needs them. I haven't had to use them often.

    I buy draft cross horses usually, or something with a native breed in it (Canadian, morgan, welsh etc) which usually have brilliant feet which is why I'll let them all try barefoot before automatically putting shoes on. I don't own TBs but I can totally understand why you guys would want four shoes at all times hunting a TB regardless of the season.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2005
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
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    6,020

    Default

    Back in VA I used weld on borium, just a bead on each heel and only on the back shoes, for a couple of decades. Worked fine. Horses didn't need the extra traction on the front end and they quickly adjusted to where they knew the traction to be if needed. Never failed me for snow/ice/pavement at speed, nor for takeoffs or landings on blue ice at jumps.

    These days I normally pull shoes in winter since I'm not living near a pack of hounds and there is country where friends hunt over the winter where hunting barefoot works fine. I use the borium tipped pins for any spring hunting (spring being relative in the Rockies) and for summer Pony Express re-ride and parades.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Sep. 28, 2003
    Location
    Wildwood, MO USA
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    2,599

    Default

    I hunt with shoes on the front only and small drive ins. I used to use the screw ins but I was finding that no matter how tight I put the studs in half of them were gone by the time I got home. This doesn't happen eventing but a 3 hour hunt with a half hour hack each way to the hunt and back gave them some time to loosen up. I really didn't like the hack home on the paved roads with missing studs. After going to drive in studs I've been happy ever since.
    -Painted Wings

    Set youself apart from the crowd, ride a paint horse, you're sure to be spotted



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2007
    Location
    Connecticut
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    915

    Default

    I think this dependa on where you live, your horse, and what conditions you're willing to take on. For us, shoes, snow pads to prevent balling, and small welded studs from Jan-March or so. Horse is out 24/7 in all but the worst weather, and we have snowy/icy conditions for most of the winter. When I lived in the Seattle area I could pull back shoes for winter and he was fine. Tried pulling shoes one winter in NY - doesn't work for my guy. He's never unsound otherwise. Regardless of work, he gets ouchy without shoes and frozen ground. Kept shoes off through the winter but he never improved. He's older and has hock issues, so I figure he could use the support of shoes. Doesn't seem to have any problem with traction. But I won't hunt or do much more than walk/trot if I know it's slick.
    Gentleman J - "Junior" - My been-there, done-that jumper

    Send Your Love - "Serena" - Aug 10th 2009, Rest in Peace



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