The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 4 of 5 FirstFirst ... 2345 LastLast
Results 61 to 80 of 95
  1. #61
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,062

    Default

    Side note, writing in journals can be really hard for kids! My oldest son often wrote nothing, because he didn't even know where to begin. The school they attend now has second graders write back and forth to 8th graders. It is much easier to answer questions your really cool older pen pal has asked you, and to ask them questions in return.



  2. #62
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,424

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Beentheredonethat View Post
    This is my philosophy on journal writing. I make it a timed game for a reason.

    The ONLY thing they are graded on is writing the correct amount. So, even if they don't write about the correct topic, it's OK (though the purpose is to learn to do that and they SHOULD be trying.)

    The ONLY rules for journal writing is AT LEAST 20 minutes of writing NONSTOP. The first quarter I expect a minimum of 250 words, about one page. Each quarter it will go up 50 words and 1/2 page. If they do this as directed, they will easily be able to get much more written.
    In 2nd grade? 250 words?

    The OP's son is 7. 1-2 sentences at this point seems typical.

    OP - I think your son sounds very normal - school is boring at 7 for many kids. The backward N, 3 and 9 is not unusual to me, either. I know of many kids who had this same issue. It's not a big surprise, to kids it's sort of random which way to make the letter. My kids & I take Russian and even I, at 43, had to double check many of the letters when I first started WRITING them. I could read them correctly, but when I had to make them myself, I sometimes would forget which way they went.

    I would try watching him write some "journal entries" at home. Maybe he can't think of anything to say? Maybe he is focusing on grammar instead of just writing? Maybe he thinks it is boring and doesn't want to do it (my guess )

    We homeschool too, and a lot is because my younger dd sounds like your son. She is capable, but found school really boring and would just "opt out". We called it her conscientious objection to school. She still dislikes writing, and prefers to story tell using tape recorder, etc. - I think it is frustrating to her that sh can't write as quickly as she can think, and writing itself takes away from her creative process. But we can work around that; it's harder to do it in school.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #63
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,661

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SMF11 View Post
    Side note, writing in journals can be really hard for kids! My oldest son often wrote nothing, because he didn't even know where to begin. The school they attend now has second graders write back and forth to 8th graders. It is much easier to answer questions your really cool older pen pal has asked you, and to ask them questions in return.
    I agree and, as the parent of three boys, I think that it is particularly hard for boys. Too many of the reading material and journal writing assigments I've seen involve personal narratives and writing about feelings...not things your typical boy is very into or finds interesting. One of my boys was OK with that, the other two, not so much. They'd be much more engaged reading and writing about things and actions, than about thoughts and feelings.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #64
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2003
    Location
    Hunterdon County, NJ
    Posts
    3,037

    Default

    I taught English in CT public high schools for 7 years. My first reaction to your description of the meeting with your son's teacher was "If this is how she responds to your questions, how does she respond to his?" I'm disturbed by her non-answers. Granted, it's likely your son's teacher has her share of underperforming students, but what is she doing to help him? I'd meet with her again and get specifics. Try to determine if it's the teacher who's dropping the ball here. Can you ask other parents about this teacher? Sometimes, a teacher may not be a good fit for a particular student. Maybe your son can be moved to another classroom.

    I agree with those who've advised you to get a tutor and to have eye and other tests done. These first years of reading are too important to fall behind. One thing I want to add about IEPs and special ed programs is that they cost money. It's a sad fact that many school systems lack funding and will put off special ed help as long as possible. One parent I know saw similar issues with her son in the first or second grade and he didn't get help until fourth grade.

    So, be proactive (but nice!) with the school and teacher and get your son the help he needs.
    Kendra
    Runningwater Warmbloods & Mare Station

    Home of SPS Diorella (Donnerhall/ Akut), EMC What Fun (Wolkentanz I/ Lauries Crusador), and EMC Raleska (Rascalino/ Warkant) 'Like' us on Facebook


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #65
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2010
    Location
    Near the beach
    Posts
    442

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by glfprncs View Post
    One other thing that I feel the need to share because I've seen it several times on here. An IEP is not an automatic thing. There are criteria that a child must meet in order to qualify for an IEP...they truly must have a disability that impedes his or her learning. Many children simply develop at a different rate than his or her peers, or they are an overall slower learner than average. This doesn't mean they have a disability of any sort, and they won't qualify.

    In Georgia, the process of qualifying for an IEP takes a considerable amount of time, testing, data collection, analysis and discussion to determine if the child truly has a disability that prevents him or her from being able to participate in the curriculum.

    The goal of teachers and schools is to challenge every student and to give them the tools to succeed in those challenges, not to move those children who struggle into an IEP. Most truly don't need it if we can find some key strategies that help make the content more approachable. Alas, with 30+ kids in the classroom, differentiating to 30 different children is a challenge.
    Very well said, glf!.... Many of you don't really understand the IEP process. You cannot be slapped with a label of any kind or get an IEP ( that is an individual education plan) without going through at least six weeks of data taking and analysis to determine if other interventions might help (at least here in VA that is the case - I'm assuming it is similar where you are). Then you go through a complete pyscho-educational evaluation to see if there are processing problems or other issues which may qualify a child to receive special education services. Just because a child is struggling with academics does not mean a school system arbitrarily will put him in special education.

    OP, I would request that the process be started at school because it is better to know for sure whether a child has a learning disability so that interventions can begin as early as possible, if necessary. Since, your father was dyslexic, there is a strong possibility that your child might be as well. It is very common for children with LD to receive read aloud accommodations to clarify directions, or other strategies that will make school easier for him.

    That being said, school is much more academic now than it was 20 yrs. ago. It often benefits a boy, particularly, to start kindergarten at 6 rather than at 5. Writing is a difficult skill for most children at that age, because they have to not only organize thoughts in their heads, but then get them down on paper. They are still struggling with letter formation and spelling, as well, so there is a lot going on for them to think about. And making change is a very difficult skill, too! Just because your child is having difficulty with those skills does not mean he has a learning disability.

    An excellent source of information on LD is the site " LD Online". Has tons of info for parents, educators and even students. Please remember that most teachers and school administrators want the very best for your child.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #66
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,424

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ridingagain View Post
    Very well said, glf!.... Many of you don't really understand the IEP process. You cannot be slapped with a label of any kind or get an IEP ( that is an individual education plan) without going through at least six weeks of data taking and analysis to determine if other interventions might help (at least here in VA that is the case - I'm assuming it is similar where you are). Then you go through a complete pyscho-educational evaluation to see if there are processing problems or other issues which may qualify a child to receive special education services. Just because a child is struggling with academics does not mean a school system arbitrarily will put him in special education.
    I understand this. I just find it sad to think that because a 7 year old boy isn't performing well in class that we should assume there is something wrong with him and have him evaluated. The fact is that the range of normal is huge at that age.

    So the "other interventions" are a great idea in theory, but the reality is that he might not NEED any intervention at all, except in order to keep up with his class. Which is, unfortunately, the bottom line for a public school, because giving him time to mature isn't one of the options.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #67
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,661

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    I understand this. I just find it sad to think that because a 7 year old boy isn't performing well in class that we should assume there is something wrong with him and have him evaluated. The fact is that the range of normal is huge at that age.

    So the "other interventions" are a great idea in theory, but the reality is that he might not NEED any intervention at all, except in order to keep up with his class. Which is, unfortunately, the bottom line for a public school, because giving him time to mature isn't one of the options.
    Yes, but the only way to determine whether there is a need is to do the evaluations. My youngest has an IEP, it was a long, involved, process to evaluate him and determine what support he needed. Since Special Ed services cost money, I'm not aware of any school system that just gives them away without careful evaluation and planning. In our case, the process was initiated by the school, not us, when he was 6 and in 1st grade. The very experienced teacher spotted right away that his behavior/issues were outside of what is "normal" for a boy of that age. Since our (much) older boys did not experience similar problems at that age, and the Catholic kindergarten he'd been in just considered his problems in school to be strictly behavioral, we really didn't know what was "usual".


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #68
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2000
    Location
    Chesterland, OH USA
    Posts
    2,763

    Default

    I spoke with my son again this morning and told him that he and I are going to figure out some new ways to make school not so frustrating for him. He gave me a big hug.

    I like the idea of observing a class so I can see where is he struggling. The teacher seems like she would be open to accommodating different things. And if it is not obvious to me how to help him after observing, then I will have him evaluated by a third-party. I think we have a very good school system - it is why we moved where we did.

    My fear is that he missed some basics last year and that if he doesn't get comfortable with the skills he needs to demonstrate, then it will spiral downward and erode his confidence and he will start to hate school.

    And, yes, the journals are touchy-feely things like, "How do you show your family you love them?" He wrote, "I show them by helping them." When she reviewed his entry, she wrote, "How do you help them?" but it is kind of too late at that point, since the exercise is over.

    How ironic is this? Every year since second grade, my daughter has been paired with learning challenged kids in her class to help them interpret instructions. I actually started to complain because I thought it would interfere with her learning, but she insisted that she enjoys it.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  9. #69
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2010
    Location
    Near the beach
    Posts
    442

    Default

    [QUOTE=S1969;6660262]I understand this. I just find it sad to think that because a 7 year old boy isn't performing well in class that we should assume there is something wrong with him and have him evaluated. The fact is that the range of normal is huge at that age.

    There is not something "wrong" with people with LD - they have a learning "difference" because their brain processes things differently than most of the population. Most people with LD are of average or above average intelligence, they may just need different methods to access academics than most people. Evaluation would determine if special education services could help the child.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #70
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,382

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paddys Mom View Post

    My fear is that he missed some basics last year and that if he doesn't get comfortable with the skills he needs to demonstrate, then it will spiral downward and erode his confidence and he will start to hate school.
    If that's the case, see holding back or getting a tutor....it's not fair to kids to treat them as SpEd because they just weren't quite ready for the material. Especially if it's because the previous teacher passed them when they haven't got the material down.

    And, yes, the journals are touchy-feely things like, "How do you show your family you love them?" He wrote, "I show them by helping them." When she reviewed his entry, she wrote, "How do you help them?" but it is kind of too late at that point, since the exercise is over.
    Ye gods, no wonder he's not thrilled with it. What a stupid assignment. And he's SEVEN--if he managed to write "I show them by helping them" in reasonable writing with minimal spelling errors, good for him. Our museum programs were aimed at the third and fourth grade state curriculum, so that's who we got, and some of the packages of thank-you notes I got...I would have been grounded for a month if I'd brought home writing in third grade with the printing and spelling I've gotten. (And they're still using the giant three-line 'learning to write' paper....) Why is his teacher making him feel inadequate over answers that are appropriate for a seven-year-old? And giving lame, limited topics to boot.



  11. #71
    Join Date
    Sep. 6, 2000
    Location
    Decatur, GA
    Posts
    2,568

    Default

    Your son sounds just like mine. He is in the third grade this year and things are really looking up. He has always done things later than other kids. He had a passie until he was five but on his 5th birthday he said, "I am going to stop this now" and he put it down and never touched it again. My husband and I moved to Atlanta just to put him in better schools. He now goes to Decatur City Schools and it has been just fantastic. They don't sit and do worksheets all day like in his old school. They walk to the city square and have rallies and they do tons of exercise and treat the children as whole people. He has still struggled with handwriting and he still hates to write but all of the sudden he is getting much better. His teacher thinks that he may actually be gifted in some areas but these things like spelling and writing were beginning to have an affect on his self esteem. One thing that I have done for him is to make the house completely quiet and sit right by his side and do homework for about 20 minutes only. I have been coaching him as he writes and making him correct every incorrect letter. He used to blow his stack with this kind of intensive direction but I just weathered the fit and now he is ok with it. I am a counselor and although I don't treat children I do assessments on children so I get to interact with them and their parents while I take a history. I can tell you that children that are struggling in school need kind, intensive and very directive and confident directions on how to be successful. A laisse faire attitude that probably works well with your daughter is the opposite of what your son needs (only my opinion). You have to teach him how to be successful, how to persevere until he finds success and to be kind to himself on that journey. That is a life lesson that will serve him his entire life. My advice to you is to not worry too much! He probably doesn't have a learning disability and I wouldn't even start down that road. I also don't support holding kids back, it can have a terrible affect on their self esteem. Just get supportive help if needed but also give him some space to mature at his own pace. Schools can be very rigid and if a kid doesn't fit the way they do it they want you to change the kid (with drugs, tutors, whatever) when they often need to take a look at themselves. My son tells me that they never do any school work, and he has learned more in the last few months than he did the entire first three years of school. He is not bored. As a bonus I predict he is going to get his first A on a spelling test today! We will have to celebrate. Good luck to you.
    “If you are irritated by every rub, how will your mirror be polished?”
    ? Rumi



  12. #72
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2012
    Posts
    282

    Default

    I admit to not reading through everything...

    Before you jump to conclusions like mental issues or holding him back, consider that public schools these days are trying to fit every shape into a round hole. Some school/teachers try their best, and some just don't even try.

    Fact: 90% of boys are active and need active work. This means taking walks while learning history or science or whatever, writing words in mud or sand, or frosting a cake with words. This means taking him outside, and letting him practice change with frogs and bugs.

    My friend is in a great position and home schools her boy. Shes done the above + online games for him. During testing, he does one page (btw hes 7 too), then runs around the table at the library for a few laps, sits down again, repeat. He's allowed to be noisy and active. At 7, you can not tell a little boy, nor expect them too, be quiet and be drilled on academia. This is something that is taught when they are older and have a better grasp on life.

    If you can, look into an alternative school (Waldorf, etc) or see if you can homeschool or school at night with him. It's not your fault, square child, round hole.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #73
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2000
    Location
    Chesterland, OH USA
    Posts
    2,763

    Default

    I am reading EVERY post and giving all of your thoughts serious consideration!
    He is actually a pretty good speller and often gets 10/10 on his spelling tests. I think, like me, things that are black and white are preferable to grey things.

    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    Why is his teacher making him feel inadequate over answers that are appropriate for a seven-year-old? And giving lame, limited topics to boot.
    And she said she wants 9 sentences for each topic by the end of the year!
    She advised me to find things he wants to write about. And do what? Have him write some research papers at home?
    Well, why doesn't SHE find things he wants to write about for the class journal entries? [/End Teacher Rant]

    I emailed and asked for when is a good day to observe the classroom.



  14. #74
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2005
    Location
    between the mountains and the sea, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,936

    Default

    Are there books he enjoys reading? Maybe he could read a book and write a BRIEF (like maybe 2-3 sentence), summary, or even his favourite scene in his own words, with illustrations if he enjoys drawing.

    One thing my parents used to have us do was write about "outings" we took to places like the open air farm, ship yard, etc. Again, even if you had him draw and then describe his drawing using a few sentences that might help.
    "Choose to chance the rapids, and dare to dance the tides" - Garth Brooks
    "With your permission, dear, I'll take my fences one at a time" - Maggie Smith, Downton Abbey



  15. #75
    Join Date
    Nov. 21, 2012
    Posts
    13

    Default

    Update?



  16. #76
    Join Date
    Oct. 6, 2004
    Location
    central New York State
    Posts
    2,847

    Default

    What the hell?? the teacher had no suggestions? That is her JOB to work with your son and figure out strategies WITH You to help him also learn skill sets. I would call for a meeting right away with this teacher, you and the principle of your son's school.

    The very, very best thing you can do for you son, or even your daugther (b/c may A students can and do struggle from time to time-this I know). Is ADVOCATE.

    I am one of 7 children. Four of us had terrible dyslexia, including me and my mother never, ever stopped advocating for us-ever! I saw this to y therapy student's parents too. Speak up often b/c of you don't no one will and he'll be socially promoted year after year after year until it's just about too late.

    Start there and then develop a plan With the school to help your son.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #77
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2002
    Location
    From the South
    Posts
    1,133

    Default

    As a special ed teacher of 31 years-it takes more than just recommending a student to be placed in sp. ed. Lots of testing-which shows the student's strengths and weaknesses. Then, meetings with parents, teachers, educational psychologist, and this is after Tiers 1-3 have been implemented in the classroom. I teach 7th grade, the majority of my students are labeled Learning Disabled, which means they have an average to above average IQ, but due to some processing skills problems, they have difficulty reading, writing, and/or in math. Are they intelligent? YES!!! They just learn differently. I actually had difficulty with advanced math, until I started teaching. Then, I learned how to do it through teaching. Don't panic! Just because you learn something a different way, does not mean you don't get to the end goal.
    Life is great when you can hug a horse.



  18. #78
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,424

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by S1969 View Post
    I understand this. I just find it sad to think that because a 7 year old boy isn't performing well in class that we should assume there is something wrong with him and have him evaluated. The fact is that the range of normal is huge at that age.

    So the "other interventions" are a great idea in theory, but the reality is that he might not NEED any intervention at all, except in order to keep up with his class. Which is, unfortunately, the bottom line for a public school, because giving him time to mature isn't one of the options.
    Quote Originally Posted by ridingagain View Post
    There is not something "wrong" with people with LD - they have a learning "difference" because their brain processes things differently than most of the population. Most people with LD are of average or above average intelligence, they may just need different methods to access academics than most people. Evaluation would determine if special education services could help the child.
    So glad for OT day again so I can respond to this. I totally understand that a LD student doesn't mean there is something "wrong" with them.

    I am simply saying that just because a kid is not performing at the top of his class - there may be nothing at all not entirely "typical" about him/her. Kids develop, grow, learn at different rates and in different ways - that does not make them LD. That makes them normal.

    Even if you normalized for the HUGE age differences in kids in elementary school you would still find a large range of "normal" for learning. Of course, there are some kids that truly are LD, but I think that many kids who are labeled LD in early elementary school are probably NOT learning disabled, they are just learning (typically) at a different pace than their classmates. However, it is not possible for a public school system to manage 20+ kids in a class learning at different rates.

    Hoping the OP has a positive update.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  19. #79
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,203

    Default

    OP, be sure to love your boy fiercely and individually.

    It's really hard being a kid who doesn't fit the mold at school. That's his current career, and it's not like he has had any other jobs.

    He needs to see an adult who demonstrates the "Hey, we'll figure it out... and you are still a rock star." You gotta walk the walk. Don't let this one conference bum you out too much.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #80
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2002
    Location
    canada
    Posts
    377

    Default

    My son was terrible in school, public school was a struggle. First couple of years of high school was great, and then for the rest it was aweful. He did not have a learning problem, it was he just didn't mesh with the structure of school. Some of it was no confidence and the rest was just did not learn well in that environment. Most of the time i couldn't tell him anything i had to show him. All is not lost, not everyone fits into the same mold, and i think that is a lot of what the problems are in our school system. Its to easy to blame teachers, or environments, I just dont think there is enough flexibility in the systems to allow alternate ways of learning.I am sure your son will find his way and become a fine young man.Mine did, he opened a business at 20 and by 23 he had bought a house. He does quite well for himself. He is smart, surrounds himself with good people and the business does just fine.
    www.tayvalleyfarm.com
    My other home.



Similar Threads

  1. Owner? Parent? Or?
    By MsM in forum The Menagerie
    Replies: 73
    Last Post: Sep. 18, 2012, 05:18 PM
  2. Best Line Ever... teacher to student
    By EqTrainer in forum Off Course
    Replies: 215
    Last Post: Apr. 9, 2012, 09:21 PM
  3. Jan Byyny as a teacher?
    By whicker in forum Eventing
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: Oct. 7, 2011, 11:18 AM
  4. Being a parent or step parent
    By Bugs-n-Frodo in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Apr. 3, 2011, 10:58 PM
  5. Losing A Parent
    By dani0303 in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 47
    Last Post: Sep. 4, 2010, 09:18 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •