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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2012
    Posts
    50

    Default Working Student gives up??

    So, I just wanted some opinions. I was doing the whole working student-trying-to-turn-pro but several things I took into account made me quit, which I'm sure you've all heard from a million young adults before:

    1.) the pay, or rather lack of. I was living off of free rent and lessons with the inability to earn extra money to start a project of my own.

    2.) not enough talent. I guess this speaks for itself. I was willing to work very hard for lessons but never made it past 3'3" hunters and eq.

    3.) No social life. I know that sounds whiny but who doesn't want to go out for a drink or at least have dinner with a friend once a week? I was literally working 13 hour days, 7 days a week. I'd wake up at 5:30am then pass out after showering at 9pm. It just wasn't worth my mental fragility anymore.



    So I've decided to put my big girl pants on and go back to school for radiation therapy. It's in the health industry, I can help people and the paycheck is massive even at entry level.

    I am sooooo tempted to get back into the field as a pro. I adored teaching lessons, running camps, starting greens. I guess it's the same feeling that kept me so gun-hoe about the potential to become professional in the first place. Anyone who's had that kind of a dream knows that it takes a special drive to want to get up every day and make it happen. It just finally fizzled out of me one day after a really nasty day with my boss. But I don't honestly like it when pros cover themselves up as ammys for showing and I want to keep my ammy status to show any projects I might be getting so I won't be teaching, or a tleast being paid to teach, any time soon. I was going to buy a little project with the money I had saved but well that's not going to happen for various reasons for the next four years.

    Anywho, has anyone gone this route before? I'm tired of dealing with bosses that under pay (or don't at all as a working student) and seriously over work to the point of exhaustion. I work retail now, two jobs at the moment, and I feel I am in the lap of luxury of working conditions. I work inside, in the ac. I don't have to lift huge bails of hay or get trampled on by uncut, undisciplined colts. My boss gave me a raise and promotion after a month's work. I can't believe that I don't have to shovel 25 stalls on my own or dump buckets, half way over the window, half way onto me every morning!! I love selling and anything to do with businesses and problem solving. I wish I could have a job that paid well starting out. International Business? I'd love to work for a high-end saddle company like Antares (which I own and love). I'm willing to go to school for a bachelors and potentially for a masters.

    Eventually, someday, I would like to have a string of prospects or just projects that I can help train with another trainer, well rather just sit on, and re-sell or lease out. That is my ultimate dream but I want to have a main job that can support me, take care of me, and is steady. I should mention I used to be a professional groom and to just go to the shows, mount up and groom one horse and sit and chat with the trainer would be like being a millionaire in my book.

    Any help would be appreciated. I'm really just asking for help. I don't know if anyone on here has ever felt like this but I always feel intimidated about posting on these big sites. I COME IN PEACE!

    So what profession earns a lot starting out that involves a business degree or masters only that's in the business, marketing, sales, or health industry world? I was thinking of nursing but I hear the hours are hell.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2012
    Posts
    50

    Default

    Wow that ended up being a book.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2004
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    2,963

    Default

    ARNP is masters only until 2014 currently, the hours can be hell (ask me about my day..... not..) but the pay is reasonable and in private practice you can set your own schedule.

    If you're going into business, an internship is just about mandatory, and you will not be paid much. Starting salary isn't much, and even going straight for an MBA is frowned upon without business experience to back it up. There are a lot of healthcare positions that aren't provider level but not nurses, and they make good money and have good hours, i.e. xray tech, ultrasound tech, etc.

    Ultimately, I think your head is in the right place. Ask if you can do short informational interviews with a few people in professions you are interested in, and ask them these questions. I love helping people get into nursing, I talk their ears off when I do. I know a lot of other professionals who like mentoring.
    send some of their smart literate deer who can read road signs up here since ours are just run of the mill dumb ones who get splatted all over creation because they won't stay in the woods



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 1999
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    4,415

    Default

    Been there, done that.

    At least you know now that you do not want that life, rather than regretting that you didn't try.

    Keep plugging on, keep your eyes open for opportunities, and good offers will come your way.

    If you love selling and the business world, don't expect to start out making $$$ - but keep plugging on, keep your eyes open for opportunities, and good offers will come your way.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    41,158

    Default

    You already decided to change paths and try new ones.

    Now don't tie yourself down to any one for now, see what is out there and keep thinking what will be your best fit.

    You would be surprised how many young adults I know that are like you, so many choices, tasting the waters and eventually finding fabulous fits for them.

    Just keep your mind open, there is so much out there and good luck, as you seem to have all else already going for you.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,692

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Papyruse View Post
    3.) No social life. I know that sounds whiny but who doesn't want to go out for a drink or at least have dinner with a friend once a week? I was literally working 13 hour days, 7 days a week. I'd wake up at 5:30am then pass out after showering at 9pm. It just wasn't worth my mental fragility anymore.

    ...

    . I wish I could have a job that paid well starting out.

    ...

    Eventually, someday, I would like to have a string of prospects or just projects that I can help train with another trainer, well rather just sit on, and re-sell or lease out. That is my ultimate dream but I want to have a main job that can support me, take care of me, and is steady. I should mention I used to be a professional groom and to just go to the shows, mount up and groom one horse and sit and chat with the trainer would be like being a millionaire in my book.

    Any help would be appreciated. I'm really just asking for help. I don't know if anyone on here has ever felt like this but I always feel intimidated about posting on these big sites. I COME IN PEACE!

    So what profession earns a lot starting out that involves a business degree or masters only that's in the business, marketing, sales, or health industry world? I was thinking of nursing but I hear the hours are hell.

    Well, I have a 9-to-5 that pays enough to live off of and a string of training horses on the side.

    Guess what? I get up at 5:00 to ride before work and then go back to the barn after work and stay till 10:30/11pm. Last Sunday I started at 9am, drove to four different barns across creation, and didn't finish til 8:30pm. I took an evening off to watch the election on Tuesday and it was the first weekday evening I was not at a barn in weeks. Social events once a week? I hang out with my friends at the barn. Welcome to the dream.

    Honestly, it's fun and wonderful, but it is WORK. A lot of your post reads like you want to skip the grunt work at the beginning, want flexible hours, want great pay without seniority or overtime, and want a nice couple horses to show and somebody else grooms while you hang out with the trainer.

    You are welcome to follow me around and tack up in exchange for rides but I guarantee you in all of last Sunday I "sat and chatted" for zero minutes. If you tack up fast and hand me the next horse as I am getting off the prior one, we'll get out by 9:30pm instead of 11:00. You can have your lesson at the end of the night if we get done early enough that I can still be home by midnight.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2009
    Posts
    1,018

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    Well, I have a 9-to-5 that pays enough to live off of and a string of training horses on the side.

    Guess what? I get up at 5:00 to ride before work and then go back to the barn after work and stay till 10:30/11pm.
    This is my life. I see my husband for like 15 minutes a day (which may be why we still love each other! LOL) Social events are planned out way far in advance and free weekends do not exist. Luckily, my horses live at home, so there isn't much driving, but this is both a blessing and a curse, as I have barn work on top of riding duty.
    The grass is always greener, it seems. One thing for sure- unless you were born with multiple silver spoons in your mouth, living this life is WORK.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,372

    Default

    So are you abandoning the radiation therapy piece?

    I guess in my mind, the way to go about this particular type of dream is to first make money--which means an education and a steady job. Then your horse stuff can be your hobby until such time you find the right horse related job and you can choose how much or how little you want to do.

    Or you can marry really well. <---totally kidding.

    As for jobs that pay pretty well, have good hours, etc...you might look into health information systems. Some sort of technology. Lots of stuff out there for that and it's typically normal business hours. Pretty portable too.

    Nursing is hard. Just the school part is hard. If you're going to have to work a lot while you're going to school, you're not going to have any horse time. I tutor nursing students. It's a lot of work. And then you are dealing with seniority based shift work at a hospital.

    If you don't have to work a lot, you might look at NP or PA as those are both portable as well and you can work in a GP office with normal hours.

    Best wishes.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
    Posts
    8,216

    Default

    If you're interested in the healthcare industry and like sales, what about a pharmaceutical sales rep? I think that's a way to make a lot of money, but I know nothing about the kind of schedule you'd have. Maybe a lot of travel, which wouldn't leave much time for riding...

    I think lots of us horse lovers have wanted to have a career in the industry but have found that for many of the reasons you listed above we'd rather keep it as a hobby.

    I think the ideal track is to win the lottery, buy a big horse farm, have your own trainer and a barn full of nice horses, have a couple girlfriends keep their horses at your barn, and you can "sit and chat" whenever you want to . . . including happy hour, which should have champagne and a cheese plate on the deck overlooking the green pastures that are perfectly manicured, complete with perfect fencing that looks pristine. Oh, wait, we're talking about you!
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,481

    Default

    I don't know of ANY jobs, other than *possibly* commissioned sales, where you start off in business with a big comp plan, lots of flexibility, and bosses/ coworkers/ customers that don't sometimes annoy you. As my father used to say, "That's why they call it work, and why they have to pay you to do it."

    And obviously in sales, there is generally little or no "salary" ... there is a base (maybe) or a draw (more likely) and it's up to you to generate the revenue that pays your way.

    Healthcare sales might be a good avenue to explore. But be aware that most really successful sales reps have to have a very good understanding of both the clinical issues their products are designed to address, AND the business factors (regulatory, reimbursement/insurance, political etc) that impact both product development and purchasing decisions. That is not the kind of information that you typically pick up in a class or two; it requires time and experience in the industry to develop. That said, the bigger healthcare companies tend to still have training programs, and they are often a good place to start.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jun. 22, 2012
    Posts
    50

    Default

    Thanks for all the replies everyone! I guess if I'm being totally honest with my self, in reply to a few posts, I DO want to start off with a big paycheck without working my way up. And I think that's being pretty honest about what MOST people want. I honestly don't think it's a bad thing to want to earn money :3 Pharmaceuticals rep does sound very interesting. I love learning so doing internships is fine with me.

    I think the ideal track is to win the lottery, buy a big horse farm, have your own trainer and a barn full of nice horses, have a couple girlfriends keep their horses at your barn, and you can "sit and chat" whenever you want to . . . including happy hour, which should have champagne and a cheese plate on the deck overlooking the green pastures that are perfectly manicured, complete with perfect fencing that looks pristine. Oh, wait, we're talking about you!
    Sounds perfect! My trainers that I worked for always told me to marry into money.... except I don't think they were joking

    I absolutely LOVE to work, I'm just not into the physical labor part anymore. And at first I was very disappointed with myself. I kept asking myself, "Am I lazy? Am I greedy? What about all those people who taught me, or those that I told that this was my number one dream?" And guess what? After talking with those closest to me they were perfectly fine with it! And I don't think I'm lazy! I'm going to school and have two jobs, a dog, and plenty of hobbies.

    I guess I want to make this post for those who have doubts about the industry.

    So far, I plan to go to school for radiation therapy. It seems like the best fit so far. I'm going to Armstrong Atlantic in Savannah Georgia.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 2001
    Location
    Neither here nor there
    Posts
    1,203

    Default

    A few years ago I wrote a thread called "flunking out of the horse world," which echoes your post in some ways.

    I had spent the last six years as a full-time working student or low-paid assistant. Loved the horses and the world of shows (still do), but realized that my skill set was not one that would ever allow me to "make it" as a rider the way I wanted to. However, I could not give up the horses either.

    I ended up going back to grad school and getting a journalism degree, while still putting in 25-30 hours a week at the barn to attempt to pay my bills. I now work part-time in my field and part-time at the barn.

    After all these years of trying as a rider and not quite making it, my flatwork has gotten to the point where I am a flat rider for several lovely Grand Prix horses. It's a great job, and my other job is flexible enough that I can travel to shows with them.

    Now, my situation is not like yours. Firstly, I chose one of the lowest-paid and least secure "real" jobs ever, which I still love (and after all the years of working for almost free, I still feel rich on my supposedly-crappy salary).

    But my point is that hopefully all your years of hard work in the horse world will allow you to keep a hand in it, probably without paying what everyone else has to. Take the time to find what you like and don't panic, it will be fine!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "I know nothing with any certainty, but the sight of stars makes me dream." --Vincent Van Gogh



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