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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
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    Default Non-traditional (US) Christmas Dinner ideas! Looking for a theme.

    We hosted Christmas last year, hosted TDay this year and will be doing a Christmas dinner here after my hubby and the kids get home from doing Xmas in MI. We'll likely have some friends over as well.

    Mr. Roo asked if we could do some sort of not-Xmas Xmas dinner. I love to cook so I'm game. I'm just not coming up with lots of good ideas. I love doing the turkey, homemade stuffing, potatoes, etc. But I think this could be fun.

    Hubby is Danish, I'm (mostly) German. I was thinking about trying to do some sort of a "cultural" theme.

    Anyone have ideas, or websites with good ideas? I've got some time as we won't be doing our dinner til the Saturday after Xmas. My last remaining grandparent is not much of a cook so she's no help. I asked DH's mom for recipes as she's really into the ancestry stuff and cookbooks but she never responded to the email. So here I am!

    TIA!
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 6, 2002
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    Oregon
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    If it were me...

    I'd smoke some ribs and do twice baked (and loaded with bacon, cheese, onions and sour cream) potatoes. Both are ridiculously low maintenance to make and oh-so-good. Nearly zero cleanup is also a bonus, IMO.

    No help on the German/Danish cultural food, I'm Irish! Potatoes for all!
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2002
    Location
    WA State
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    Default

    Well - a Danish Christmas dinner is roasted Duck filled with apples and prunes (We will just do Duck breasts this year), caramelized baby potatoes, red cabbage, and brown sauce. Dessert is Ris a la mande (rice pudding with cherry sauce)


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Might be too similar...but you could go funny and make The Christmas Story roast duck with head still attached and all the sides Chinese.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Mar. 30, 2007
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    Just make a bunch of yummy stuff and call it a feast!
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2003
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    Default

    I like to do lasagna for Christmas. Almost everyone loves it, you can make vegetarian versions if need be, and it's super simple.

    Not sure what I'll do this year -- lasagna just seems too heavy for summer and hamburgers seem too informal.
    According to the Mayan calendar, the world will not end this week. Please plan your life accordingly.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
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    Default

    How about FRESH pizza on the grill.

    Make your FRESH pizza dough, get your add ons, and go for it.

    YUM. I have done this and it was great!

    Beer for all. Ok, margaritas for all. And we need to start drinking those NOW since we will all be dead come friday. Is it friday, or do we have a whole week to die out? Anyhoo, get those yummy fresh ingredients for the pizza, oh I mean maragritas!

    Hey you can do garlic bread sticks too on the barbie. YUM.

    And yes, toss the dough right on the grill. Turn over when nicely firm/light brown, and toss on your FRESH made stuff.

    I make my own sauce, buy fresh mozzarella (or make it yourself), and get as many FRESH stuff to stick on the pizza as I can.

    You said you were game, so GAME ON!

    Where is that wormy Tequila?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
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    2,346

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heinz 57 View Post
    If it were me...

    I'd smoke some ribs and do twice baked (and loaded with bacon, cheese, onions and sour cream) potatoes. Both are ridiculously low maintenance to make and oh-so-good. Nearly zero cleanup is also a bonus, IMO.

    No help on the German/Danish cultural food, I'm Irish! Potatoes for all!
    This is pretty close to what we're having: ribs, corn on the cob, & rosemary or garlic redskin potatos. maybe potato salad.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2006
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    Months before our first Christmas together, my now husband and I were watching the Two Fat Ladies on the food network, doing Christmas in Jamaica!
    (one of the best cooking shows evah)

    So we decided to do Carribean - we went to a local Jamaican store, picked up some goat, plantain, etc. I made callilou soup (had to use spinach, couldn't find real calilou) and he made the jerk seasoning and seasoned the goat.

    Most of it went on the bbq - we drank tropical drinks, and really had one of our best Christmas dinners. It was a lot of fun.

    I'm sure if you google TFL Christmas in Jamaica, you could find that episode.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    Jul. 15, 2003
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    We always have crab (Dungeness, because we are California folk) and fondue. It's been my husband's family's traditional dinner since he was a teenager. It's a good dinner.
    Don't tell me about what you can't do. That's boring. Show me what you can do. - Mom



  11. #11
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    Aug. 30, 2007
    Location
    Sunny Florida
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    I never have tradional fare for Christmas dinner. Duck, Goose, Lamb, Steamship round, Cornish Game Hens but my favorites are Crown Roast of Pork and Beef Wellington...

    Germanic might be Sauerbraten (sp)....

    Yum ! I need to go make dinner now.
    "I can explain it to you, but I can't understand it for you..."



  12. #12
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    Well, awesomeness. I guess now the kids aren't coming until the following Sunday late so who the eff knows. Ex wife hell, I tell you.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  13. #13
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    Nov. 1, 2007
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    ....in a classroom in Fl, by the ocean
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    We do the whole traditional dinner with Thanksgiving and doing it again almost a month later is too much. Since I have lived in FL, (about ten years now, I am from Philly area) and any Christmas I am home (in FL) (used to be a traveling CDE groom) I do a Fish Feast. All seafood. Fish, crab legs, shrimp, cole slaw, and some kind of potato. Nom Nom



  14. #14
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Deep South
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    You HAVE to have Christmas crackers; http://www.tomsmithchristmascrackers.com/

    http://www.wonderful-denmark.com/dan...as-dinner.html


    The Danish Christmas dinner is very much influenced by the fact that Danes love good food and the coziness - (we call that hygge) - of eating together with friends and family.
    The concept of hygge is best descriped as warm, fuzzy, cozy, comfortable feeling of well-being.One of the most common combinations associated with the traditional Danish Christmas dinner is the:


    • Pork roast
    • Roast Duck
    • Ris ala Mande

    However, roast goose or turkey is also served for Christmas in some families.

    Pork Roast
    For the pork roast we either use the breast piece with the skin on it or pork neck with rind.

    With a very sharp knife you cut the skin (through the layer of fat) all the way to the meat, a cut for every third of an inch. Be careful not to cut into the meat.Spinkle the roast with salt and rub the salt into the cuts.

    Use a deep roasting pan preferably with a metal grid. Place the meat as even as possible on the grid.Turn on the oven to 380 to 400 F degrees and place the roast in the bottom part of the oven. After an hour and a half you check the roast with an oven thermometer. The roast is done when the inside temperature shows 175 F.Potatoes

    The Christmas dinner comes with two types of potatoes as sides:
    • Peeled and boiled potatoes
    • Caramel potatoes

    Caramel potatoes


    For the caramel potatoes we use small potatoes, - either canned and cooked potatoes or small fresh potatoes.If you use the canned potatoes, they need to be drained and dried on a cloth before frying.With fresh potatoes, you boil/steam the potatoes with the peel on them, let them cool off completely before peeling.
    In a deep frying pan you pour a layer of sugar. The layer has to be a third of an inch thick.Place the pan on the heat and let the sugar start melting. Be careful with the sugar, it burns easily!
    As soon as the sugar is getting hot you add a table spoon full of butter and stir the mix.
    Add the potatoes and stir them frequently. Let them cook in the sugar until they are evenly coated and golden brown.

    Red cabbage



    Another side for the Christmas dinner is the cooked red cabbage. Most of the time we buy the pre-made cabbage and just heat it up, however, if you want to make your own home cooked cabbage, here is the recipe:


    • 1 red cabbage, sliced up in thin slices
    • 1 once of butter
    • 2 apples, peeled and roughly grated
    • 1/2 a cup of vinegar
    • 1 cup of red currant juice
    • 1/3 cup of sugar
    • 1 tea spoon salt

    Procedure
    Lightly fry the cabbage in the butter. Add the grated apple, vinegar and currant juice and heat up until boiling an let it boil slowly at low temperature for 45 minutes.Add sugar and salt to suit your taste.


    Roast duckThese days a lot of people are trying out new recipes for roast duck, like the French Duck a l'Orange, but the traditional roasted Christmas duck here in Denmark is the big, country bred and fattened duck.

    Recipe
    • 1 duck at about 6-7 pounds
    • 2 apples
    • 2 cups of stoneless dried prunes
    • Salt
    • water

    Procedure
    Clean the duck inside and make sure all feathers and feather follicles are gone. Rub the inside of the duck with salt.
    In a litre of water you boil the wing tips, heart, liver, neck and gizzard to make the broth for the sauce.
    Peel the apples and cut them into boats or dice. Mix apple boats with the prunes and fill up the duck with the mix. Close the duck tight with meat needles.
    Rub it outside of the duck with salt and place it "face down" on a roasting pan - preferably on a grid.
    Turn the oven on to 480 F and place the duck on the bottom shelf of the oven.
    When the oven has the right temperature and the duck starts to get a little color, pour about a litre of water/broth into the pan, turn down the heat to 380 F and leave the duck roasting for 45 minutes. Turn the duck around and let it roast for another 45 minutes to an hour(time depending on the weight of the duck).
    Pour the water/broth from the roasting pan through a strainer and leave it in a narrow bowl for a while. Skim the fat from the water. Save 3 table spoon full of fat for cooking the sauce.
    Cut up the roasted duck into pieces with a very sharp knife and serve.
    Sauce


    • 3 table spoon full of fat from the duck
    • 2-3 table spoon full of flour
    • broth
    • a cup of milk
    • 1 table spoon full of sour creme
    • 1 tea spoon sugar
    • Salt
    • Food color

    Heat up the fat in a pot and add the flour. Stir til the mix is smooth and pour in broth. While stirring, heat up the sauce and add the milk til the sauce has the consistence, that you like. Add a bit of salt, the sour creme, sugar and food color (if you have any).
    Christmas dessert

    Ris ala Mande

    Rice porridge is THE traditional Christmas food. In the old days it also served the purpose of keeping the local Christmas elves happy.
    Is was common knowledge, that if you didn't place a big bowl of rice porridge - with a big lump of butter in the middle and a generous sprinkle of cinnamon - for the elves in the attic, there is no telling what they might do to make your life miserable. They will tease you, make things disappear or in any way make sure you know they are not pleased with you. ;-)

    In my house the Christmas cookies often disappear...

    Ris ala Mande is really a delicious sophistication of the old traditional Rice porridge.
    The foundation is still a bowl of rice porridge, but for the Ris ala Mande, you add whipped creme and almonds.

    Recipe(4-5 servings)


    • 2 cups of milk
    • 2 oz of pudding rice
    • 1 vanilla bean
    • 2 table spoons of sugar
    • 2 - 2 1/2 cup of whipping creme
    • 1/2 a cup of finely chopped almonds
    • 1 WHOLE blanched and peeled almond


    Procedure
    Split the vanilla bean. Cook the milk, rice and vanilla bean at low heat (simmering with the lid on) for about 50 minutes.Remove the vanilla bean and let the porridge cool off.Stir in the sugar and the chopped almonds and let the porridge get cold.Whip the creme and gently stir it into the cold porridge.
    Ris ala Mande is usually served with hot or cold cherry sauce, and we still add the whole almond for someone to find and be the lucky winner of the....
    Almond present
    ... _. ._ .._. .._


    2 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2006
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    I'm doing a pulled pork shoulder, slaw, mac & cheese (with pumpkin, brie & bacon), and Irish Champ. Because it's just me and I can
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
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    So the "ris ala Mande is really Riz à l'amande? lol Any way you spell it tho, sounds yummy.

    We don't know yet what we'll have for Christmas dinner. We don't have a specific tradition, although I grew up in France eating: oysters and smoked salmon toasts with Champagne before dinner, then my father's recipe of scallops in whisky sauce, then chestnut-stuffed turkey, red cabbage with chestnuts, a big fruit salad (citrus and pineapple), and finally the traditional bûche.
    The only thing I've "kept" here are the smoked salmon toast and the bûche. Other than that, it changes every year.
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!



  17. #17
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    Sep. 24, 2003
    Location
    Bristol, TN
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    We do make-your-own pizzas after Mass on Christmas Eve. For Christmas this year we're having steaks, as we're leaving for a week the day after Christmas and don't want leftovers. We traditionally spend the whole of Christmas day in our pajamas and don't cook anything requiring extraordinary effort, but then that's only the four of us.

    I would try an Indian theme--curry, homemade Naan (which is easy), rice, peas. I love this.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by HighFlyinBey++ View Post
    I'm doing a pulled pork shoulder, slaw, mac & cheese (with pumpkin, brie & bacon), and Irish Champ. Because it's just me and I can
    Right on.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have,
    at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  19. #19
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Emryss View Post
    We always have crab (Dungeness, because we are California folk) and fondue. It's been my husband's family's traditional dinner since he was a teenager. It's a good dinner.
    Where do you live? I would like to respectfully request an invite! I'll bring good wine!
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
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  20. #20
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    Mar. 19, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by loshad View Post
    I like to do lasagna for Christmas. Almost everyone loves it, you can make vegetarian versions if need be, and it's super simple.

    Not sure what I'll do this year -- lasagna just seems too heavy for summer and hamburgers seem too informal.
    How far downunder are you? Lasange would be way to hot and heavy here for a summer Christmas. I'd do lots of yummy salads with fruit in them. Fish on the barby and pavlova to follow would be my ideal summer Christmas feed.
    Last edited by Dreamwalker; Dec. 18, 2012 at 11:52 PM.


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