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  1. #1
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    Default Tombstones in old graveyards

    Or perhaps I should say "cemetaries". Nah, I like the visual I get when I say "graveyards". Anyway.. if I can get this pic off my phone I'll post it. In the middle of nowhere I found an old, but incredible beautiful headstone. It is huge! Has a lifesize form of a woman leaning on a tall rock covered in ivy. The workmanship is lovely.

    Here's a site I like to peruse. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...rotNbedTXoEqwg
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  2. #2
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    Gestalt, given the link you posted, I hope you have a copy of Lucy Zeh's Etched in Stone. Illustrated with many, many photos of both the horses and their gravestones, along with maps of the Kentucky counties identifying where the graves/memorials are located.
    Last edited by Windsor1; Nov. 2, 2012 at 08:41 PM.


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  3. #3
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    Dec. 7, 2006
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    Oh do try to post it! When I go to visit my family, I take a stroll throughout the graveyard and just look at the old ones.

    I've never seen one like the one you are describing, but in denamrk where the other half of my family is I go to visit the gravesites, and they are so elaborate and beautiful compared to the ones in Canada. There are minature hedges bordering every site, with gorgeous flowering trees, shrubs and other plants.

    I really wish we are allowed to plant things here, instead of just grass.



  4. #4
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    I visited the Claiborne cemetery last year when we did the farm tour for my birthday. Loved it. Felt strangely surreal to be that close to the bones of great horses.

    Windsor, your link isn't working for me but I assume it's Etched in Stone? I have a copy of that floating around. Nice book



  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by ohrebecca View Post
    Windsor, your link isn't working for me but I assume it's Etched in Stone? I have a copy of that floating around. Nice book
    You're right--it's not working for me either, but yes, it is Etched in Stone. Go to exclusivelyequine.com and look in the clearance section. Not only are they practically giving that one away, there a BUNCH more lovely books in there offered at a fraction of their original price. Sire Lines (if it's the same copy I have, it's a hardcover edition) for 7.95?!? A must for anyone who's into thoroughbred breeding. And Anthony Alonso's lovely art book and Barbara Livingston's Saratoga, each $9.95? Wow.


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  6. #6
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    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  7. #7
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    Default

    The link works but the pic is tiny...wish I could see more. Thanks for sharing tho.


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  8. #8
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    Wow, that is beautiful. I love wandering old graveyards.
    "Aye God, Woodrow..."



  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by tazz001 View Post
    The link works but the pic is tiny...wish I could see more. Thanks for sharing tho.
    Hey tazz, maybe going to the album would be better. ???

    http://s269.photobucket.com/albums/jj65/pipandgoose/
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  10. #10
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    I was there over the summer - hallowed ground!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Gestalt View Post
    Or perhaps I should say "cemetaries". Nah, I like the visual I get when I say "graveyards". Anyway.. if I can get this pic off my phone I'll post it. In the middle of nowhere I found an old, but incredible beautiful headstone. It is huge! Has a lifesize form of a woman leaning on a tall rock covered in ivy. The workmanship is lovely.

    Here's a site I like to peruse. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...rotNbedTXoEqwg





  11. #11
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    Nov. 1, 2007
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    I LOVE old head stones. Its my favorite thing to wonder around old graveyards, been doing it since I was little.


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  12. #12
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    What a beautiful Gravestone! It's huge! Having just spent $4500 on my fathers stone, which was just a regular sized one, I can't imagine how much that one cost!



  13. #13
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    Queenstown New Zealand has a great Cemetary. I took a lot of pictures when we were there. I love to visit them. I love to walk around and read the names and think about them. I think it keeps the a live just a little if someone remembers.


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  14. #14
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    I love old cemeteries. In New England, it was especially nice, as the old grave art is fascinating. I've also covered way more of Arlington than someone with no relatives there probably ought, and I've even been in the much-less-known Alexandria National Cemetery (where I nearly snapped an ankle; subsidence, it's not your friend!) though I haven't gotten to, I think it's St Paul's in Alexandria, where the grave of the Unknown Stranger is (a ghost story site.) In Michigan it's harder to find interesting sites as they're not very old (early 1800s, usually--the state's been settled for over 300 years, but there's not much left from that time period.)


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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miss J View Post
    What a beautiful Gravestone! It's huge! Having just spent $4500 on my fathers stone, which was just a regular sized one, I can't imagine how much that one cost!
    She is listed as beloved wife, died in, I think I read, 1908. The were other big, nice stones with endearing script, but this one is huge. The woman is life size.
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gestalt View Post
    She is listed as beloved wife, died in, I think I read, 1908. The were other big, nice stones with endearing script, but this one is huge. The woman is life size.
    And it's just, well...ART.

    At that time, nothing could really have made that but human hands and lots of time.
    "Aye God, Woodrow..."


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  17. #17
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    The Scottish Cemetery in Kolkata India is one of the most beautiful and other-worldly places I've stepped foot in. I don't have any pictures I can link to of my own, but this is from the web

    http://scottishcemeterykolkata.files...1/cnv00022.jpg
    http://scottishcemeterykolkata.files...olkata-027.jpg
    MrB's attempt at talking like a horse person, "We'll be entering in the amateur hunter-gatherer division...."


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  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by danceronice View Post
    I love old cemeteries. In New England, it was especially nice, as the old grave art is fascinating. I've also covered way more of Arlington than someone with no relatives there probably ought, and I've even been in the much-less-known Alexandria National Cemetery (where I nearly snapped an ankle; subsidence, it's not your friend!) though I haven't gotten to, I think it's St Paul's in Alexandria, where the grave of the Unknown Stranger is (a ghost story site.) In Michigan it's harder to find interesting sites as they're not very old (early 1800s, usually--the state's been settled for over 300 years, but there's not much left from that time period.)
    Have you ever been to the Woodlawn Cemetery on Woodward and 8 mile Rd? My mom used to take us for picnics there in the 70's. The Fords and Dodges all have mausoleums there. Well over 100 acres of some of the most beautiful headstones, mausoleums, lakes, ducks ect.


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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by bits619 View Post
    The Scottish Cemetery in Kolkata India is one of the most beautiful and other-worldly places I've stepped foot in. I don't have any pictures I can link to of my own, but this is from the web

    http://scottishcemeterykolkata.files...1/cnv00022.jpg
    http://scottishcemeterykolkata.files...olkata-027.jpg
    All I can say it "WOW"!!!! I just realized the inscription I thought was on the stone I posted was actually on one a bit farther down. The stone looked like an acorn, it was pretty big too, and had the beloved wife quote on the square bottom. I should have taken a pic of the lamb stone with the childrens names on it. A real heart breaker. So many children died before they were two. Maybe some disease ran through the community?
    "All top hat and no canter". *Graureiter*



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Proud To Be Spotted View Post
    Have you ever been to the Woodlawn Cemetery on Woodward and 8 mile Rd? My mom used to take us for picnics there in the 70's. The Fords and Dodges all have mausoleums there. Well over 100 acres of some of the most beautiful headstones, mausoleums, lakes, ducks ect.
    No, I never have--wrong side of the state now, and when I did live near Detroit, we didn't really go poking around it too much (Dad's old neighborhood's half gone, none of my family lived in the city any more-wouldn't have been safe). Though I do have relatives in Mt Olivet, I think it's called, and Resurrection.

    We didn't go sight-seeing in New Orleans when my friend was at Tulane Med, either...sadly you can get mugged in those ones in broad daylight.

    Of course, what I REALLY love poking through are the old and half-abandoned ones...old Trenton no. 1, on Fort Street (IIRC; it's near the A&W in downtown Trenton) is maybe a half an acre and has the old table stones, and upright markers, and unfortunately the kind of vandalism one expects. I get why a lot of very old family plots nad small country yards are off-limits, but they usually have the best markers!

    And then there's Sleepy Hollow in Concord, MA....



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