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  1. #81
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2012
    Posts
    128

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    Hi,
    First - I'm sorry that you both sustained injuries. IMHO this was just bad luck. It could have happened with a deer, a fox, a child, or any other animal that suddenly appears at the end of an arena.

    Second - I looked at your blog and she's a beautiful horse! The wounds don't look that bad to me. I've certainly seen worse. I would be thanking my lucky stars that there were no fractures or tendon/ligament tears. Those external wounds will heal and you'll hardly ever know they were there.

    Third - I totally agree about fencing in the riding area. Yes, trail riding is inherently dangerous, but you were not on trail, you were counting on the security of the arena - which is probably why your guard was down. BO should consider some type of perimeter fence especially if there is a road nearby. I would mention it to the BO in a kind, non-confrontational way.

    Fourth - I see you use the fuzzy type girth with the fleece lining. I love those too, especially for schooling - but they do slip, and the elastic on them stretches out. Something to consider.



  2. #82
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,093

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    I am an eventer, I trial ride at least three days a week. I prefer an arena that is NOT enclosed.

    But I want my barn / property my horse is going to be on to be fenced off from major ROADS. I would not be as happy to have an open arena if it was next to a road – I would want a fence between the road and the horse.

    Where I do the majority of my trail riding has a fence between where I ride and the highway. I haven’t come off during a trail ride in about 20 years, but I would feel much less comfortable if there wasn’t any barrier between where I was riding and a busy road. My step mother came off during a trail ride once – horse went hell bent for leather home – and ended up crashing through the windshield of a car. Horse and driver lived, although the horse had serious injuries.

    My barn is right off of a pretty quiet highway. We make sure the gate is closed AT ALL TIMES. Worst nightmare would be to have horse get away from its handler, and end up killing an innocent driver on the road.

    And yes – the Kentucky Horse Park has a fence around it. All of the places I have ever evented have fences around them (and manned entry ways if there are not gates). You do not want a horse to dump a rider on XC and end up on a busy road!

    Quote Originally Posted by justhoofit View Post
    Fourth - I see you use the fuzzy type girth with the fleece lining. I love those too, especially for schooling - but they do slip, and the elastic on them stretches out. Something to consider.
    Oh good point! I had a persistent saddle slipping back issue that was driving me batty! That is, until I ditched my beloved fleece, double ended elastic girth, for a leather, single end elastic one - slipping problem went away!



  3. #83
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2012
    Posts
    82

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    When you ride out in the trails or even next to trails you will encounter many things-foxes,ground hogs, deer,falling branches...part of the known risk with riding.

    I wouldn't mention it to the owner of dog because its your fault you fell off. You had loose girth -end of story.
    Why does the BO want you to call on the neighber-sounds very suspicous to me. Any problems between them?



  4. #84
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2012
    Posts
    82

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    Quote Originally Posted by SendenHorse View Post
    if my horse went off like a rocket at the sight of a dog I'd go back to basics and work on desensitizing. JMHO. I wouldn't feel safe on a horse like that. my horse can jump at a sudden noise but doesn't take off. Big difference.
    Great advice!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #85
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2010
    Location
    All 'round Canadia
    Posts
    4,968

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    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    Yeah, have to say I'm surprised at the number of people who apparently board and trail ride at completely enclosed facilities, only, ever.

    How does the entire endurance forum go on fenced-only trailrides?

    Is Rolex fenced in?

    I've boarded and lessoned at places where the farm was fenced but the majority of places have not been. Also I have never been on a fenced in trail ride, and I even cross and/or ride on the side of roads.
    The barn I'm at now is by a busy rural "highway". The outdoor ring is enclosed and there's fencing and gates between the barn/paddocks/arena and highway.

    I can go out the back where the fields and trails are, of course. If my horse dumped me out there, she could run all the way around the barn and make it onto the highway if she really wanted, I mean there's not continuous fencing separating the fields from the road. But more likely she'd run to the barn, or maybe into the fields.

    If she dumped me in the arena, she'd have to make it out of there (she could jump it, it's not exactly stallion fencing), past another fence, and then the tall perimeter fence to make it to the highway.



  6. #86
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    4,986

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    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    Yeah, have to say I'm surprised at the number of people who apparently board and trail ride at completely enclosed facilities, only, ever.

    How does the entire endurance forum go on fenced-only trailrides?

    Is Rolex fenced in?

    I've boarded and lessoned at places where the farm was fenced but the majority of places have not been. Also I have never been on a fenced in trail ride, and I even cross and/or ride on the side of roads.
    I got the impression from the OP that this is a green bean in training. Not quite ready for the wide open spaces.



  7. #87
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    8,597

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    Quote Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' View Post
    I got the impression from the OP that this is a green bean in training. Not quite ready for the wide open spaces.
    When I broke my now-seven year old at age three and a half, it was early November. It took a week or so to get him to walk, trot and canter both ways with steering and brakes, and then, not wanting to do more than ten or so minutes of ring work with such a baby, I threw a cooler on him (it was generally below twenty degrees), went out in the hills in the snow, and watched the sun come up from horseback. We did this through April until he was physically more ready to work more intensely in the ring.

    That horse was broke going on solo trail rides through open fields on bitter cold mornings in central NJ (and we had to cross a road, too) between 5 and 6 in the morning. The whole point was not to do ring work, because he was just a wee baby.

    OP has had her horse for three years.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
    Posts
    4,986

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    Quote Originally Posted by meupatdoes View Post
    When I broke my now-seven year old at age three and a half, it was early November. It took a week or so to get him to walk, trot and canter both ways with steering and brakes, and then, not wanting to do more than ten or so minutes of ring work with such a baby, I threw a cooler on him (it was generally below twenty degrees), went out in the hills in the snow, and watched the sun come up from horseback. We did this through April until he was physically more ready to work more intensely in the ring.

    That horse was broke going on solo trail rides through open fields on bitter cold mornings in central NJ (and we had to cross a road, too) between 5 and 6 in the morning. The whole point was not to do ring work, because he was just a wee baby.

    OP has had her horse for three years.
    Good point - I don't work with young horses so I hadn't considered it, but I guess ring work is harder on a young horse physically and mentally than trail riding in the open.

    I know it's harder on me - I think I ride better in the open because I'm not constantly having to adjust for the next change in direction.



  9. #89
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Trails and woods
    Posts
    1,585

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    Big Problem with riding in open is that Most people are scared and fearful. That fear is transmitted to the horse. Person reacts, horse reacts. It becomes a downward spiral or a self-fulfilling prophecy. Many riders are fearful; they either don't know it or admit it.

    Training a horse to ride in the open isn't difficult or that hard. Training the rider to not be afraid or reactive is very difficult. Many riders aren't prepared themselves if an explosion were to happen, either in an arena or in the open.

    Accidents happen. Preparation of both horses and rider is key. Knowing what to do when is paramount. Reacting instead of thinking gets many people into sticky situations.

    I hope both horse and rider heal quickly and recover fully.
    Life is too short to argue with a mare! Just don't engage! It is much easier that way!

    Have fun, be safe, and let the mare think it is her idea!



  10. #90
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    17,459

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    No slip pad.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



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