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  1. #101
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    Feb. 16, 2010
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    Jacksonville, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by texan View Post
    Of course giant pony, and not have cars, and dont eat out and cant have all sorts of things. After all its all these well meaning people, who pay their taxes and work harder than anyone else in the whole world, are the only ones footing these social programs. Geesh... what a crock!! Yes i am being sarcastic.
    MYOB in case it comes back to bite you in the a$$ one day, cause Karma is a beotch
    You're talking in extremes. It is a taxpayer's business how taxes are spent. Eating out, owning a car, big screen televisions... these are all modern luxuries. In times past eating out was a once in a while special occasion type of thing. I remember when only the truly rich owned big screen or flat screen televisions.

    In some cities public transportation isn't possible, but in many riding the bus is an option. Owning a car is not a right. I'm not saying if your on disability that you shouldn't have a car but it's aggravating seeing someone in front of you at the grocery check out paying with an EBT card and they've got an iPhone and a designer purse with their nails all done. And then you make your way to the parking lot they're loading their groceries into a nicer (brand new) car then you yourself own. Gosh, what an idiot I am buying a used vehicle and paying for my own living expenses.

    Obviously not everyone on some type of assistance program is like the person above I described (and have indeed encountered) but this is where the frustration comes from. There is clearly a lot of gaming of the system going on.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  2. #102
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    Sep. 5, 2005
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    Mass.
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    Quote Originally Posted by PalominoMorgan View Post
    I also have a service dog. I "look" fine. I look younger than I am and I park in the handicapped spot. Hearing loss can be a blessing so I don't hear most comments like some of the above when I am getting myself, daughter, and SD in to the store or whatever. That said, most illnesses ARE invisible. Keep your judgement to yourself. You have no idea what her situation is.
    Is all you have hearing loss or do you have other problems? I don't quite understand how hearing loss entitles someone to a handicapped parking spot?
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #103
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    Feb. 16, 2010
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    Jacksonville, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gnalli View Post
    No, it does not keep her from working, come to think of it. She does get a disability check, though I don't know how much, as I have never asked. Maybe there is a "partial disability" classification for civilians too. I know the military has different percentages of disability, so maybe it is the same idea? I don't know. That is a good question though. This was several years back, so maybe there was something going on I didn't know about. She had gotten a really bad case of bacterial meningitis, back in the 90s when that outbreak happened in GA, which was the proximate cause of losing the leg.
    I think after a few years she should have found a job and stopped relying on disability. There's a girl at my work that has a mangled hand (extremely mangled). Her job involves a lot of typing and she does it. I have extreme sympathy for anyone missing limb(s) it's one of the most horrible things a person can have happen to them. But missing a leg shouldn't preclude work except of the manual labor type.

    I always wonder why someone would want to stay on disability or other assistance programs because the max you can make isn't as much as a job. But then I remember a lot of them work at cash jobs and don't report the income. I have one in the family. She actually has a serious mental disease. I don't know how much it keeps her from working a steady 9-5 job. The cash job she has is through a family business so she gets a lot of leeway she probably wouldn't otherwise at a non-family employer.


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  4. #104
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    Mar. 18, 2005
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    Some forms of Disability can not be seen. Depresion, PTSD, Anxiety, below average IQ. For some with theese hidden disabilities horses may be their therapy.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #105
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    Oct. 20, 2006
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    941

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    My father is on SSI now after many years of struggling to fit into normal society. He is bipolar, schizophrenic, and a few other mental disorders. Heavily medicated, he is often passable in society, but is severely agoraphobic and has a short attention span. He did work for many years in the cable industry, etc.

    However, he has to have his meds frequently adjusted and each time is a major change for at least 4-5 weeks until he stabilizes. It's extremely ugly and stressful for everyone remotely near him. Of course, that's when in the past, he was terminated from his employment. It's hard, because he can be so "normal" and smart and charming and then so extremely unstable and dangerous.

    He doesn't enjoy receiving his checks. He was part of a program which specifically sought out individuals with his diagnosis and tried to give them additional training skills to be able to be self employed. He still does do some communications work through this program and I am proud of him to do that.

    But I am also proud, since he has decided to help others, since he is receiving help. He is a major coordinator at a very large food bank and has become volunteer of the year in the county. The food bank is flexible enough to know when he needs time off (meds adjusting), but give him enough responsibility to be a productive member of society, even when he isn't receiving a paycheck. I am proud of his commitment to help others now. He also has a horse and I'm sure anyone seeing him out trail riding or driving a truck would wonder what the heck is wrong with him. Having lived with him, it's pretty apparent.

    I am sure if people saw me now, they would wonder WTH and ask why I am receiving short term disability money. I don't like it and not happy about it. I had a back injury from work and am trying desperately to jump through the hoops (PT, waiting the required time before an MRI, etc). I do still go out to the barn. Why wouldn't I? I am already so frustrated and angry, I need to do something, even if it's just working my young filly in hand and practicing halter and longing the older girl in side reins.

    I even got on my older girl and rode for a few minutes several days ago. But three days later, the pain is still incredible. If I do nothing, the pain is better, but I can't live like that.

    FWIW--I still am working on severe work restrictions. 4 hr shifts, 3 days a week. A far cry from the 55+ hours I used to work. I would rather have my life back to normal and work the heavy hours than feel like this. And I'd love to have my case resolved, so I can find a new job to move up in the world. My graduate school doesn't really offer career advancement in my current workplace, so staying trapped while trying to resolve my case is stagnating.

    But I am grateful in my case for short term disability to help cover bills in the meanwhile. I am very grateful to have a husband who makes enough to cover my needs.

    I would also hope that those that are employers, sometimes to think outside the box in being flexible to their employees. I am grateful to my employer, that even while not being able to progress, that I am still able to be a contributing member, while working with some severe restrictions.

    However, I am not sure how anyone on SSI could afford to have multiple horses without another source of income. I would certainly have to curtail or give up mine without someone else putting a roof over my head. My father lives with family as well and they lovingly support his horse and cat.

    My neighbor also receives SSI now that I think about it. At first, I couldn't realize what was wrong with him as he seemed a normal, able bodied person. Then one afternoon while giving him some home grown cucumbers, he told me about how he had contracted an infection and went into kidney failure and is waiting for a new kidney. He spends quite a bit of his time in dialysis. He owns an ice cream truck and does that for an hour or so at a time during the summers. It gives him a sense of pride and I won't begrudge that, however, it would be unrealistic to say that (or some other similar extreme part time work) should be his only source of income.

    So, while we certainly all know people that abuse the system whether it's disability or welfare or whatever, I think it is an incredible lifeline for thousands of people who have paid in and did their part for society.


    I think the best we can do, is be grateful for the opportunity that disability exists to help out those that need it and to be forthcoming in reporting those that abuse the system.

    I have enjoyed reading everyone's posts. Thank you everyone for sharing.

    I always have thought that many individuals get into horses because of a traumatic event or a greater need for stress relief. Interesting how so many of us rely on them to be our therapy--mental and physical!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #106

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guin View Post
    Is all you have hearing loss or do you have other problems? I don't quite understand how hearing loss entitles someone to a handicapped parking spot?
    The hearing loss is just a bonus when snide comments are made. I am sure I genuinely miss the majority of them. I also have many, many other issues. I have posted about them some in Eq with Disabilities. I don't feel the need to open my medical chart in this forum though. I will say though that friends told me to just get the "damned placard" at least 2 years before I finally did. When I asked my primary doc she cut me off and said "Absolutely."

    My point was that if you saw me in my baggy hoodie and sweat pants I probably look "fine". Tell that to any one who knows me and they'll double over laughing. The example I used to wrap my own head around asking for the placard was my best friend's mom who had a heart transplant and a few other issues. She looks fine too, but you can't see her scars, pain, etc. that doesn't make em less real though. The truth is that most illnesses are not visible. Can you see someone with epilepsy, no cartilage left in their joints, syncope, diabetes, chronic fatigue, chronic pain, and on and on? The answer most days is no. Because if someone is out and about that is one of the few good days. The bad days are spent at home or the hospital usually.

    My point is that the vast majority of disabilities are not visible.
    "You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars;
    you have a right to be here." ~ Desiderata by Max Ehrmann


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #107
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    Jul. 14, 2006
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    609

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    If I had enough money to hide, I'd do anything I could to hide it from you bums, including stash it overseas, or dig a hole in my damn yard. People who don't pay child support are bums too, and I think most people would agree with that. I am 100% for people working and supporting their families and children. If you can do a job, you can go to work. Service members certainly no exception.
    I agree with your assessment that certain jobs are not an option for certain people. Not too many blind cab drivers out there.

    Quote Originally Posted by mvp View Post
    I suggest you direct the appropriate amount of ire to those who hide money off-shore, don't pay their child-support, heck even those who vote for tax policies full of loop holes and the rest.

    Be sure to plug up all the holes before you go after people who are sick or hurt and taking some of your tax dollars for that.

    Keep in mind that the poverty rate for people with handicaps is higher than for other groups. Oh, and tax codes have even quantified the effects of being blind versus other physical problems. Can you imagine how much data-- and suffering and discrimination-- stands behind that?


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  8. #108
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    Mar. 6, 2002
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    Oregon
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frog View Post
    If I had enough money to hide, I'd do anything I could to hide it from you bums, including stash it overseas, or dig a hole in my damn yard. People who don't pay child support are bums too, and I think most people would agree with that. I am 100% for people working and supporting their families and children. If you can do a job, you can go to work. Service members certainly no exception.
    I agree with your assessment that certain jobs are not an option for certain people. Not too many blind cab drivers out there.
    You sure are intent on ruffling as many feathers as possible. So I'll tell you what I tell all the angry callers that I get at work - if you don't like the way the laws are, talk to the people that make them.

    You're more than welcome to tell Mr. Heinz he doesn't "deserve" "your" money he receives for being a disabled veteran. Heck, c'mon over and call him a "bum" to his face! Bless your heart.

    Oh, and PS - he does work. Many times, too hard. And will happily continue serving his country, despite the risks.
    What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what
    lies with in us. - Emerson


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #109
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    Jun. 30, 2005
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    2,185

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    I was in a bad rollover truck accident 7 years ago that left me with severe neck and back injuries. I take enough morphine normally prescribed to a 300 lb. man just to get out of bed in the morning. I work full time but I would easily qualify for disability. With that said I am still able to ride and show reining horses. There are days when I can ride and days when I lay in bed crying because no amount of drugs can take my pain away. From the outside I look fine but I am VERY broke on the inside!!!! I lost a great deal of my life when I was in my accident and I choose to work to maintain a sense of normalcy and work no matter what but I could never judge someone in the same situation for choosing to go on diability........
    RIP Sucha Smooth Whiskey
    May 17,2004 - March 29, 2010
    RIP San Lena Peppy
    May 3, 1991 - March 11, 2010



  10. #110
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    16,640

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frog View Post
    If I had enough money to hide, I'd do anything I could to hide it from you bums, including stash it overseas, or dig a hole in my damn yard. People who don't pay child support are bums too, and I think most people would agree with that. I am 100% for people working and supporting their families and children. If you can do a job, you can go to work. Service members certainly no exception.
    I agree with your assessment that certain jobs are not an option for certain people. Not too many blind cab drivers out there.
    But Frog, there are so many things your tax dollars pay for that you could not alone. Ever dial 911? Have you priced out all the infrastructure that made that system work? Do you think you could begin to purchase all that yourself? Have you realized how much easier it is for you work, do buy or whatnot living among a population that is pretty literate, doesn't have epidemics circulating, doesn't have deep, wide-spread poverty and the crime that comes with it?

    The list of crap that even the well-off get from having a poor that's not as poor as in other parts of the world is staggering. But it's not unimaginable.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #111
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    Oct. 1, 2003
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    Nonsuch House
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    Not sure if this has been said, but there are different percentages of disability. For example my DH is 30% disabled from the military. He fought to stay in and work, but lost and was kicked out and given disability. He now works for DOD helping other disabled vets. The amount of disability money is based on the actual disability. Unfortunately his disability which is physical, will never get better.
    RIP Kelly 1977-2007 "Wither thou goest, so shall I"

    "To tilt when you should withdraw is Knightly too."


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  12. #112
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    Jan. 18, 2002
    Location
    canada
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    You know i think the problem here is that some people believe that the problem with the system is all these good for nothings that dont work, and are sucking the tax dollars dry. It has been documented time and again that the issues related to social programs dont even come close to using the tax dollars. Is there always going to be someone that tries to scam the system of course, but that is not what the problem is. Tax dollars go for all sorts of things, infrastructure, eduaction, research, war, salaries of polititons, buildings, medicare, and the list goes on. Its so easy to point a figure and say well these free loaders are the problem, but truth is this is what makes the western society different from other 3rd world countries. That is what is ingrained into our core beliefs. America sends billions of dollars of aid money to other countries, why would you begrudge your fellow american the same. I just dont understand it.What about the senior citizen who continues to pay taxes that go to education and their children are long out of school. Or the single person, who pays who has no children. Its all the same thing. Sometime the people who scream the loudest about never having a hand up are the ones that took the most.
    www.tayvalleyfarm.com
    My other home.


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  13. #113
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    Jul. 14, 2000
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    midwest
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    Quote Originally Posted by texan View Post
    You know i think the problem here is that some people believe that the problem with the system is all these good for nothings that dont work, and are sucking the tax dollars dry. It has been documented time and again that the issues related to social programs dont even come close to using the tax dollars. Is there always going to be someone that tries to scam the system of course, but that is not what the problem is. Tax dollars go for all sorts of things, infrastructure, eduaction, research, war, salaries of polititons, buildings, medicare, and the list goes on. Its so easy to point a figure and say well these free loaders are the problem, but truth is this is what makes the western society different from other 3rd world countries. That is what is ingrained into our core beliefs. America sends billions of dollars of aid money to other countries, why would you begrudge your fellow american the same. I just dont understand it.What about the senior citizen who continues to pay taxes that go to education and their children are long out of school. Or the single person, who pays who has no children. Its all the same thing. Sometime the people who scream the loudest about never having a hand up are the ones that took the most.
    Texan, great points, thanks for bringing them up.

    I asked the question originally because it seemed wrong that a person using govt assistance would be able to keep two horses and travel abroad. People have shared the variables that could be in play with that persons condition of having no income that would allow that to happen. The majority who have replied here feel that it is that persons business, dare I say right, to do with the funds what they want to do with them. I think I'm coming around to their point of view. It's not a big deal, it's a lifestyle choice.



  14. #114
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    Jan. 9, 2006
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    GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by showhorsegallery View Post
    I think after a few years she should have found a job and stopped relying on disability. There's a girl at my work that has a mangled hand (extremely mangled). Her job involves a lot of typing and she does it. I have extreme sympathy for anyone missing limb(s) it's one of the most horrible things a person can have happen to them. But missing a leg shouldn't preclude work except of the manual labor type.

    I always wonder why someone would want to stay on disability or other assistance programs because the max you can make isn't as much as a job. But then I remember a lot of them work at cash jobs and don't report the income. I have one in the family. She actually has a serious mental disease. I don't know how much it keeps her from working a steady 9-5 job. The cash job she has is through a family business so she gets a lot of leeway she probably wouldn't otherwise at a non-family employer.
    I don't either. I know at one point she was studying for a real estate license, but I don't think that panned out. It may have for all I know, but I deal with a lot of realtors in my area and she has never been one of them. YOu have asked questions that really have made me think. Thanks.
    http://community.webshots.com/album/548368465RfewoU[/url]

    She may not have changed the stars from their courses, but she loved a good man, and she rode good horses….author unknown



  15. #115
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    Sep. 13, 2000
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    Greenville, MI,
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    And then there is my neighbor. Claimed full disability about 8 years ago,
    Could not possibly work, But he can build blinds chop down huge trees with a chain saw and you name it. It is called fraud in this case.
    People like him and others are the reason insurance rates are so high!
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." Caffeinated.



  16. #116
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    Aug. 14, 2000
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    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
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    Social Security disability is insurance which one collects when one is proved to be disabled for more than six months (?). The amount is based on one's work history and work income, just as regular retirement Social Security is. The premiums are part of the Social Security tax. Outside or other non-work income is not a consideration at all. You could have a million dollars per year in investment income and still draw Social Security disability if you cannot work. The only "welfare" type benefits involved come from SSI, and the amount is based on total income.

    The amount of Social Security disability benefits is the same as early retirement Social Security, I believe. And that's not very much for the average person.

    Social Security disability is NOT "government assistance"; it's a form of insurance annuity that one pays for with every dollar of income earned before the disability--unless you're talking about people who have never been able to work. I THINK, but am not sure, that they are eligible based on their parents' work history or they are SSI recipients, not Social Security disability. SSI is government assistance (welfare for the elderly and disabled who qualify for Social Security insurance but do not have a certain minimum income), but it's a program that is separate from Social Security disability insurance, although it's managed by the Social Security Administration.

    Military disability IS based on percentages, but Social Security requires total disability for benefits.

    As to whether one can horsekeep or ride while disabled, it will depend entirely on the type of disability and physical ability. One can have a mental disability that doesn't impair physical ability and draw Social Security disability because of that. I've heard severely depressed people who have to get out every day to care for horses say the horses are only things that keep them from suicide.
    Last edited by vineyridge; Nov. 24, 2012 at 07:14 PM.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire


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  17. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sannois View Post
    And then there is my neighbor. Claimed full disability about 8 years ago,
    Could not possibly work, But he can build blinds chop down huge trees with a chain saw and you name it. It is called fraud in this case.
    People like him and others are the reason insurance rates are so high!
    Everyone watching what you think is fraud, take note! If you think so, report it. Seems fair to me. The cheaters can exert themselves, but then so can the whistle-blowers.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


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  18. #118
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    Sep. 5, 2005
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    Mass.
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    PalominoMorgan, thanks for the additional insight. I can't imagine what day-to-day life is like for many of the folks who are recounting their stories here. I was just genuinely curious about hearing loss "lumped in" with true physical limitations. Best of luck to you.
    I realize that I'm generalizing here, but as is often the case when I generalize, I don't care. ~ Dave Barry



  19. #119
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    Jan. 30, 2000
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    SW PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by MyGiantPony View Post
    So because someone is on disability they are supposed to live in penury and have no joy in their lives?
    Apparently.
    Disabled does not mean invalid.


    Originally Posted by Sannois
    And then there is my neighbor. Claimed full disability about 8 years ago,
    Could not possibly work, But he can build blinds chop down huge trees with a chain saw and you name it. It is called fraud in this case.
    People like him and others are the reason insurance rates are so high!!

    People like your neighbor are also the reason people begin to scrutinize those on some kind of disability.
    Proud to have two Takaupa Gold line POAs!
    Takaupas Top Gold
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  20. #120
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    If people would think of Social Security Disability Insurance and Social Security retirement insurance as INSURANCE Annuities that are purchased during one's working life with the Social Security taxes, then a lot of the rhetoric against them would make no sense. Basically they are forced annuity purchases; and that's how they were set up initially. I can quote some of the policy statements from 1937 to prove it. That's why we have a separate social security tax, and that's why the healthy in the insurance pool support the elderly and disabled. That's how insurance works.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



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