The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 7 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 122
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    10,450

    Default If someone is on disability....

    If someone is on disability do you think it is wrong if they own horses??

    I recently learned that a person I once knew very well is on disability. This person owns two horses.

    To me if you can get around enough to ride the horses and haul them to other places to ride- which this person does- you aren't disabled.

    Discuss.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2010
    Location
    california
    Posts
    4,358

    Default

    Maybe, I also know of someone who rides and collects disability. However, she will have significant bouts with her disbility for periods of time and I have seen her bed ridden for weeks. I really try and not judge, I would rather work doing anything than collect disability.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    10,450

    Default

    SV, I agree with your heed to try not and judge someone, good advice.

    In this example the person is entered in the same equine competition I'm doing this weekend. For entry and fuel they will spend at least $100. Seems wrong.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2010
    Posts
    548

    Default

    Seriously? Wow. They have a disability but they should still get to enjoy their sport as much as possible. It's not your place to judge - it's between the person, their doctor and the state.

    Just because a person doesn't fit into your idea of disabled does not mean they are not disabled. I look perfectly fine the majority of the time but I do have very bad chronic pain (to the point where I often can't walk for days at a time) and pretty serious anxiety and depression. My horse is the reason I get out of bed in the morning. I am not on disability, but I do have some idea what it is like.

    It is up to them how they spend the money they recieve. MYOB.


    17 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,689

    Default

    The only person I know who is on full disability truly cannot work to earn a living. It doesn't mean that she can't DO things...her husband works, and together they breed dogs...when she is able she can show dogs, and do it well! But like the poster above, she can go weeks and months without being able to do *anything*. And, even when she is WELL, she has to have blood monitoring and usually additional health appointments each week. Having been the person that took her to some of these appointments once when she was not well, I wondered how her husband even manages to hold down a job.

    So....I do believe that there ARE, most definitely, people who scam the system. But, I would tread carefully....what WE see isn't always all that is going on. My friend would desperately love to ride again.....but even though she might appear healthy enough to others, she really cannot afford the risk.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2010
    Location
    california
    Posts
    4,358

    Default

    Yes, I know, however when I was going through a major depression after I lost a pregnancy at 4 months, I had two doctors trying to get me to go on disability. Which I thought was crazy, sitting around depressed ? but there are other reasons beyond physical for disability. I use to get a little irritated when she rode in lessons and I seemed to never have time with work and kids. But I still would never want to sit home and get a government check. I was on maternity leave for 8 weeks for each of my children, and I really really wanted to go back to work. I knew I needed the time to recover and take care of my babies, but it never felt good, or productive.

    Oh I see my little stalker, hello there !
    Last edited by stolen virtue; Nov. 6, 2012 at 10:10 PM.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2012
    Posts
    1,931

    Default

    People can also have had long-term private disability policies without applying for SSI.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2012
    Posts
    1,931

    Default

    I also would like to jump off and comment on on the whole not always seeing someone has a disability issue. I often have people give me dirty looks for taking the elevator one floor, or using the handicap stall with the wall handles. They assume because I look young and healthy that I'm just being an inconsiderate twat. What they don't know is that I have an autoimmune disease and often have raging joint pain that makes it hard to even get out of bed some days. So I've learned not to judge others' situations, no matter what it looks like.


    19 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 11, 2010
    Posts
    548

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PaintedHunter View Post
    I also would like to jump off and comment on on the whole not always seeing someone has a disability issue. I often have people give me dirty looks for taking the elevator one floor, or using the handicap stall with the wall handles. They assume because I look young and healthy that I'm just being an inconsiderate twat. What they don't know is that I have an autoimmune disease and often have raging joint pain that makes it hard to even get out of bed some days. So I've learned not to judge others' situations, no matter what it looks like.
    Yes! I always get dirty looks for not giving up my seat on the bus or for taking the elevator because I'm only 21. If only they could see how much it HURTS!


    4 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 13, 2008
    Posts
    2,848

    Default

    No. Much like unemployment benefits, disability benefits are based on a person having worked and paid into the system for a certain period of time and now being temporarily unable to work through no fault of their own. I can understand having a sort of automatic uneasiness with seeing someone on disability maintain luxury items like horses, but we do not own people who are collecting government benefits (whether earned or welfare), and we can not control what they choose to keep or give up with those benefits.

    There is always a population that will scam whatever's going. More to the point, there is never perfect agreement over what a legitimate use of government benefits would be. Is it moral for a student to use some of a federal tuition loan to buy a car? How about using unemployment benefits to go to a movie? Plenty of people would scream "PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY!!! You should work 10 jobs rather than spend a dime of goverment money on your "wants" rather than pure needs. Put down that soda!" Where does it even end? I have a job and a paycheck - should I be required to send everything left over from my bills and unavoidable expenses to the Red Cross for Sandy victims, to help keep FEMA afloat?


    12 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    10,450

    Default

    These are great replies. Appreciate you all sharing your personal experiences.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12

    Default

    Uhhh, most of us who are disabled would love to not sit at home on our arses too... or lie in bed. However, that isn't always feasible. I have two horses. They are with my best friend right now but I still daydream about being able to bring at least one home. Sure, I might not get to the barn as often or do a sliver or what I used to, but if that horse is the reason I get up out of bed and fight for another day who the hell are you to tell me I shouldn't have a hobby and enjoy it?

    I also have a service dog. I "look" fine. I look younger than I am and I park in the handicapped spot. Hearing loss can be a blessing so I don't hear most comments like some of the above when I am getting myself, daughter, and SD in to the store or whatever. That said, most illnesses ARE invisible. Keep your judgement to yourself. You have no idea what her situation is.
    "You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars;
    you have a right to be here." ~ Desiderata by Max Ehrmann


    9 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,541

    Default

    Some disabilities come and go, or manifest in a way the average job is not a good idea (most employers are not big on "I might be fine for weeks, but it's possible I'll just not be able to turn up for work due to excruciating agonizing pain." (Which is why I'm hoping this is all tendonitis and not a new and fun surprise from my haywire immune system, which HAS tried to kill me before, because I don't want to have any chronic issues that make it hard to use my hands. Most of my jobs involve using those. A lot. And standing.) Without knowing WHY a person is on disability, or what else their spending is (I had a horse on unemployment, and kept dancing-I don't have kids or any of that stuff to worry about), you have no way of knowing what they "should" be doing.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 25, 2004
    Location
    Carolinas
    Posts
    4,905

    Default

    Some disabilities are emotional and/or mental. As in PTSD. Not to mention the horses help with mental outlook.

    Horses are necessary for me to be semi-sane.
    "Never do anything that you have to explain twice to the paramedics."
    Courtesy my cousin Tim


    4 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    10,450

    Default

    With all due respect to some of the remarks, I know everything about the person and the situation in my OP.

    There was a point early on in our marriage when Mr. SLW's job was eliminated and the first thing I unloaded was my horse. 30 years later, I would do that tomorrow if something happened to our income.

    vacation1 summed it up very well. "There is always a population that will scam whatever's going. More to the point, there is never perfect agreement over what a legitimate use of government benefits would be."


    3 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Location
    Evansville, Wisconsin
    Posts
    3,081

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PalominoMorgan View Post
    Uhhh, most of us who are disabled would love to not sit at home on our arses too... or lie in bed.
    OMG, yes. This times about a million.

    I'm lucky that my husband makes a decent salary, and that I'm well enough to do some odd jobs from time to time. But after working a shift or two, I will literally spend the next two or three days in bed. Not exactly conducive to remaining employed. And even a pretty moderate regular part-time schedule leaves me with nothing left over for any other aspect of my life.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
    -Edward Hoagland


    3 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2012
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    506

    Default

    I know a lady with MS. Before it got so bad that she had to quit her job she had a full size horse. When she got bad enough that she had to rely on a scooter because she couldn't reliably walk anywhere, she sold him and bought a mini and a cart. She would go to shows and showed in him hand from her scooter. It kept her active and alive. Now the MS is so bad that she can't even go to the barn and had to sell her mini and cart. We don't expect her to last much longer. I would never begrudge her the happy memories that she has of the time she was able to spend with the horses.


    18 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Aug. 26, 2012
    Location
    MO
    Posts
    49

    Default

    I totally get where you are coming from SLW. Here in my small midwestern community I know many people who are on disability (SSI). The majority of them have been on it for years. They might have originally had a problem but now have extremely active lives. Some trail riding all over the country, some showing at a high level, some holding down full time jobs. It seems to me if you can work you don't need to be on disability but it appears that once you start getting it, you are eligible for life. No physicals or reassessments of any sort. It seems like it is much harder to get disability now and I know people who genuinely need it and have been repeatedly turned down. It just doesn't seem fair.

    I agree that not all disabilities can be seen and some seemingly normal people are in fact disabled. People with auto-immune diseases or people with diminished lungs being prime examples.

    But it doesn't seem fair that people who can take care of their farm, their family, and ride as many hours as they please every day of the year are classified as disabled. My moral code wouldn't allow me to take the money, but apparently it doesn't bother them.

    These aren't your typical sleazy beat the system types, they would be considered upstanding citizens in the community. I know they are all on disabilty because one of them shared it at a horse related potluck dinner and one after another contributed their tale of receiving disability. I heard it myself. If it is this rampant in my small community (less than 1,000 people), what is it like nationwide?


    9 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 18, 2010
    Location
    california
    Posts
    4,358

    Default

    I want to be clear that people on disability do not want to be there. My point was that 1. My depression would never have been resolved by not working and staying at home I think for me I needed to find other ways of coping, I'm not a person who responds well to "talk therapy" 2. If you have ever been ill and stayed home isolated after working, you will understand how hard it is.

    I understand that some people think disability is a way to be lazy, but I don't see it as that, and especially after being on "disability" with my 2 children.

    Edit: Making dinner and typing does not work.
    Last edited by stolen virtue; Nov. 5, 2012 at 11:36 PM.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2012
    Posts
    1,931

    Default

    Not true that you're on it for life- they do review cases after the person is receiving benefits. (My BFF works in the SSI organization and has told me all about it). You can also report fraud if you think someone is truly gaming the system.



Similar Threads

  1. How do you file for disability?
    By appybeads in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Jul. 6, 2012, 01:49 AM
  2. Explaining your disability
    By ClassAction in forum Equestrians with Disabilities
    Replies: 86
    Last Post: Nov. 12, 2011, 12:36 AM
  3. Intelectual Disability
    By belambi in forum Equestrians with Disabilities
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Oct. 13, 2011, 09:55 PM
  4. Grading of a disability
    By blackhorse6 in forum Equestrians with Disabilities
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Mar. 18, 2011, 04:25 PM
  5. Riding When You Are on Disability
    By Rackonteur in forum Equestrians with Disabilities
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: Apr. 19, 2010, 10:53 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness