The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 55
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    10,984

    Default Why some people are jobless

    I'm going to whine since it's offtopic day.

    My mother has been out of work for almost two years now. She was downsized from the company she worked at for over 15 years. She took a sizeable severence package and unemployment. Now that unemployment has run out she's living off a pension from a previous marriage.

    She complains every day that president Obama is not making new jobs fast enough, that there are zero jobs out there for older adults.

    She has filled out half a dozen applications for jobs she is not qualified for. She had one interview where she told them she changed her mind and wasn't interested. She was called in to fill out a more extensive application at another place but hasn't done so in the last two weeks because she's been "sick" She doesn't want to work evenings, weekends, more then 10 minutes from home, or standing on her feet. She doesn't want to work retail, n the food service industry, and she doesn't want to make less then $13 an hour.

    Ugh.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    11,331

    Default

    I think that there are lots of people out there actively searching and willing to do whatever it takes to make ends meet. But without that sense of urgency, there are folks like your mom who can muddle through and just aren't that motivated.

    My mom was recently laid off. She too does not seem that motivated to really pound the pavement at this point. In the past, she's worked two jobs when needed--it's not that she's afraid of hard work. But she is muddling through right now on unemployment and doesn't seem to have a sense of urgency. That said, she has been paying into the system for many years and many of the available jobs will pay her less than unemployment. That is kind of a morale killer.
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2004
    Location
    Piedmont Triad, North Carolina
    Posts
    2,159

    Default

    It's pride and personal drive. A good friend spent many years in a third world country (Country will not be named) trying to build several businesses. The major block was the people lacking the will to succeed. This business was given to them yet after a short time it fell apart. The people were content to go back to poverty (by our standard) It was just normal for them.

    I fear that people in our country have the same attitude. When the majority catches it, we're done for. This election will be the watershed. Do we thrive or do we die?


    6 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,269

    Default

    Yeah, I don't think that's why MOST people are out of work--in my main field (museums) the older workers with more years (10+) are killing the younger ones (like me, with less than 10 years.) There's so many people looking, including people with years and years of experience, jobs that normally would get twenty or thirty people applying have 60, 100, even 250 applications!

    I personally am not a fan of kitchen work (and it's getting to be painful--I'm waking up crying some nights because of the screaming pain in my wrist and thumb, which I'm pretty sure is tendon or carpal and is getting worse from the grabbing, lifting, tongs, awkward holds, etc) but that's what I can find right now, so I suck up and do it. I'd rather be working than not, not just for the money (which is basically better than unemployment, though as I've literally been paying taxes all my life I didn't feel too guilty/ashamed of taking it) but so I'm WORKING. I can see an older worker not wanting to be on their feet all day (it's brutal when you're NOT an older worker) and I can see how losing a long-term job and having to look at things that are way, way below what they're used to being paid could be even more disheartening, even literally depressing.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    6,518

    Default

    As an idea, one of the bigger Xerox call centers is in Indianapolis, its for Verizon. It's not the funnest job but she can make $13 an hour with unlimited over time (yes you read that correctly) from about May-January.
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2011
    Location
    Its not nowhere, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    3,723

    Default

    Oh my God enjoytheride, I didn't know we had the same mom. My mom was laid off from the airline industry quite awhile ago, and has held a series of jobs since then. She can't get along with anybody, can't just shut up and do her work, so she keeps getting fired. She has been out of work for a year now, her unemployment runs out on the 24th. She just landed a job with an airline, doing the exact job she was laid off from years ago. She was complaining about the money, how it wasn't enough to live on. Ummm hello! You aren't making any money now! Last night she said how she would try the job but she didn't want to sell her house in VA in case she hates the job here in CO and wants to quit. Like she has that luxury.With the pay fromt he new job, her SS (she is 70) and her alimony, she will be pulling in more than many 4 people households make. The kicker is she has to live with us long enough to save up money for a deposit on a condo. My holidays just tanked.
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2007
    Posts
    1,093

    Default

    I'll be 65 in Dec. Moved to my current location in 2005 with no job and a small pension. Got a temp one in 2 months and a perm 3 months later. Quit that in 2011, got another temp job 2 months later. Have been working contract jobs steadily now for almost 2 years. You have to be willing to open your mind to whatever industry or job fits your skills. Or to get the skills they are hiring for. For somebody near SS, it might be a good idea to work temp or contract jobs now so that when you start getting SS, you have also developed a relationship with an employment agency and can cut back on your hours but still earn something to go along with SS.

    You also need to be flexible in the workplace, congenial, helpful. Your Mom sounds like she ought to just retire.

    Many people I know who have been out of work for a long time either don't have the skills that are needed out there (think software skills) or don't want to branch out from what they've always done. Men who've done construction their whole lives should seriously think about going down to the community college and get those computer skills they can use when they're too old to climb a ladder or be on their feet all day.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2007
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    10,269

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BabyGreen View Post

    Many people I know who have been out of work for a long time either don't have the skills that are needed out there (think software skills) or don't want to branch out from what they've always done. Men who've done construction their whole lives should seriously think about going down to the community college and get those computer skills they can use when they're too old to climb a ladder or be on their feet all day.
    Another thing--it's often harder (emotionally and practically) for an older worker to relocate. I own a house, but ultimately it would not be GIANT problem to relocate, but for someone who's lived somewhere 30, 40, 50 years to have to up stakes and go halfway across the country? That's a lot to ask.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,468

    Default

    DancerOnIce...look up De Quervain's Tenosynovitis. (had to copy the name from the sheet the doc gave me, LOL)

    It sucks big time, but is fixable with physical therapy exercises. Sounds like you may have that too. And it's pretty damned uncomfy.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,119

    Default

    By 70, RB, she should be able to retire and for heaven's sake she shouldn't be trying to buy another house! Is the other one paid off?

    We went through the whole rigamarole when the MIL retired at 65. She was going to earn extra money to supplement her SS +state pension but she just couldn't do it. I'm 54 and the wear on my body has become much harder to deal with than 20 or even ten years ago, I have to start thinking about how I am going to deal with my workload by age 60 and then 65 (or 66 and 6 months or whatever).

    She talks a lot but doesn't even go out and apply for work as a greeter at Walmart - and I understand that the cost of getting there vs the pay can make it a better deal to stay home sometimes.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
    Location
    Where humidity isn't just a word, it's a way of life.
    Posts
    702

    Default

    Where my husband works they cannot hire enough employees; no special skills needed to start, starting pay $11-15/hr with overtime available. But heaven forbid, it is shift work in the manufacturing industry, never mind that they offer great benefits and love to promote from within with excellent wage increases.

    They can get the applications, but average over 3/4 failing the drug test. Those that get hired often quit within a week or two, the usual complaints being long shifts, being expected to work hard, and only having 4-5 breaks (not a misprint).

    So far they are averaging about 1 new employee that stays out of 50 who are pre-hired pending the results of the drug test. And this is an area that screams about the high unemployment and no opportunities for unskilled labor.

    It has really opened my eyes to another side of the high unemployment discussion.


    13 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    10,133

    Default

    Your Mother could be my 47 year old recently divorced younger sister. She has been trying to get disability status for two years. She doesn't want a husband, just someone to pay her way in life.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2005
    Location
    washington state
    Posts
    6,518

    Default

    Babygreen, you sound like the sort of person I would like to hire. Older (55+) folks who have an open, helpful, friendly, and willing to learn mentality tend to not only be super employees, but also mentors to the younger folks. They also can add stability to a diverse work group.
    The Knotted Pony

    Proud and upstanding member of the Snort and Blow Clique.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2011
    Location
    Its not nowhere, but you can see it from here
    Posts
    3,723

    Default

    Well, she should be able to but she can't, thanks to a sucky divorce, losing most of her 401k and investments, and 20 years out of the work force as a SAHM. She has also been supporting my 31 year old sister with cars, insurance, cell phone etc. She is the most fiscally irresponsible person I know. Eats out constantly and shops all the time despite being unemployed. I kind of wash my hands of the whole thing.
    If she sold the other house, she could buy a very nice patio home or condo in almost any part of the country, but esp here in CO. Sis and I have been telling her to unload it for the last year. It has tripled in value since she bought it and is in NOVA, where housing is on the upswing
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2001
    Location
    Finally...back in civilization, more or less
    Posts
    11,436

    Default

    From the other side of the equation... I have a couple of open positions right now, and am having a *really* hard time filling them. I do get applications - apparently from people who can't read, since they do not have the required credentials - but of the 4 people I've interviewed, two showed up more than a half hour late (for a 10 am interview? really?) and not a single one knew one d*mn thing about my business. I did meet *one* gal who I thought was terrific; she had really researched us, was very articulate and made a great impression, but unfortunately she lacks the necessary education and licensure that she'd need for me to hire her. Sigh.
    **********
    We move pretty fast for some rabid garden snails.
    -PaulaEdwina


    4 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2007
    Posts
    1,093

    Default

    Yeah, one thing about being older, you're pretty likely to pass the drug test.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,119

    Default

    We had that drug test problem too. Mass hirings before the holidays and half of them fail the test. Which is just plain stupid because they tell you in advance you'll have to take one, and often with enough time ahead so you can get it out of your system by not using for a day or two, but nooooo . . . the dope smokers just can't quit for a week or two and the pill poppers can't stop for a day - but who'd want those in your workforce anyway?
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible


    5 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,126

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by MistyBlue View Post
    DancerOnIce...look up De Quervain's Tenosynovitis. (had to copy the name from the sheet the doc gave me, LOL)

    It sucks big time, but is fixable with physical therapy exercises. Sounds like you may have that too. And it's pretty damned uncomfy.
    I had that thumb problem and injecting the joint once five years ago and following with the splint for several weeks fixed it, never to come back.

    Get a very good hand surgeon to look at your wrist/hand and see if you can be fixed that easily.



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,809

    Default

    Sadly, Walmart has eliminated their greeter positions. That was going to be my
    fallback job. Read somewhere that the majority of new jobs are going to the
    over 55 crowd.
    Julie
    www.centaurfencing.com
    Safer, Stronger, Lasts Longer!
    Godspeed BARBARO--Run fast and free!



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 20, 2006
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,076

    Default

    this thread is interesting to me, because i've been noticing tons of help wanted signs around my area lately (philly). my mom is up in the lehigh valley as the head nurse at a ltc facility, and told me the other day how they're going through employees like crazy because they just...don't show up.
    My mare wonders about all this fuss about birth control when she's only seen a handful of testicles in her entire life. Living with an intact male of my species, I feel differently! WAYSIDE


    2 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 37
    Last Post: Apr. 7, 2013, 07:05 PM
  2. Replies: 77
    Last Post: Aug. 13, 2012, 09:24 AM
  3. What People Think Dressage People Do
    By Mike Matson in forum Dressage
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Feb. 20, 2012, 09:11 PM
  4. Replies: 116
    Last Post: Jan. 2, 2011, 04:04 PM
  5. Replies: 60
    Last Post: Aug. 28, 2009, 09:21 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness