The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    4,111

    Default War Dogs

    This could go in Menagerie too.

    I never knew much about dogs used in war, but my DS10 has a project at school for Veteran's Day that requires him to interview a veteran. Both of his grandfathers were veterans (Vietnam and Korea), but they are both dead, so we had to cast around. I found a man I work with who is a Vietnam veteran and who was in a Scout Dog unit. This lead to some side research, on my part, for my own interest.

    Fascinating stuff. And, the super sad part is that, at the time of the Vietnam War, dogs were considerd "equipment" or "armaments" and almost ALL of the war dogs used in the Vietnam War were euthanized in country or abandoned there. Out of 4-5,000 only 200 came home. These dogs were heroes, in ever sense of the word and saved thousands of lives.

    Ugh. I've been teary eyed about this all weekend. My coworker told me that dogs came home with their handlers and were retired during WWII and that Clinton signed a bill that allowed military dogs to come home and be retired into civilian homes, so I guess it's better now.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,716

    Default

    http://www.vet.utk.edu/wardog/background.shtml

    Now I'm teared up too, dogs are amazing. I was curious about the breed of choice for that war and found that it was the Doberman. I thought it was pit bull so found a link with heroic PBs that had me tearing up.

    People have really raised the importance of dogs in our society. It has some goofy ramifications, like dog clothes that come with buttons and hoods (really?) but also good ones so that the dogs of war can come home along with their people.
    Last edited by cowboymom; Nov. 3, 2012 at 09:56 PM.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2006
    Posts
    1,776

    Default

    Canaqua - thought you might find this interesting:

    http://aiwdedication.ca



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    8,089

    Default

    Here's a military dog adoption site, in case the project should lead to thinking about getting a retired military dog!

    http://www.militaryworkingdogadoptions.com/
    "The difference between genius and stupidity is that genius has its limits." Albert Einstein

    http://s1098.photobucket.com/albums/...2011%20Photos/



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug. 24, 2009
    Posts
    289

    Default

    We are a military family and our current installation has a working dog program. Retired dogs and 'washout' dogs now go to adoptive families to live out their days - several of our friends have family dogs who came from the program. Doesn't make up for what used to happen, but please rest assured that today's military working dogs have a much better shot at life!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Posts
    3,982

    Default

    The Belgian shepherds (Malinois, Groenendal, Tervuren) were used extensively in World War I. I can see why, my parents have a young Tervueren who is just so sharp and intelligent, quick with a great sense of humor, she'd almost top my Sdt poodle!
    http://www.terrificpets.com/articles/10223465.asp
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2010
    Location
    All 'round Canadia
    Posts
    5,955

    Default

    Some of the dogs are quite aggressive. I talked with our dog guys, and a lot of the dogs overseas required really skilled handlers and would not be fit for civilian adoption - we had to patch up the handlers a good few times after their own dogs bit.

    Depends on the dog, of course; and its main job, I think. The sniffer and search dogs weren't aggressive.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2005
    Posts
    951

    Default

    Coanteen is right on - although I'll be nit-picky and say "High drive" rather than aggressive: ) *Most* working dogs are great at their respective jobs because they are high-drive and selectively neurotic. Please recognize I say this with a loving tone and big smile. This same intensity, while wonderful for the job, means they may not make the best pet for a family. With that said - mandatory disclaimer - some working dogs are GREAT pets. Its just that the dogs are trained to do a very specific job - and the transition out may not be the easiet, or safest, option. However - the "washout" dogs may be wonderful because they weren't suited to the required intensity.

    I work/train Narc/police dogs and they are wonderful, amazing creatures. However - the qualities that make them great working dogs deserve respect - and the understanding that not all working dogs can turn "off" when they come home.

    I am not saying the should all be euthinized - but I also do not have a suggestion for the right option.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2006
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    1,331

    Default

    "Oh, sure, you may be able to take down one smurf, but mark my words: You bonk one smurf, you better be ready for a blue wave."---Bucky Katt



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2004
    Posts
    6,993

    Default

    The military has been terrible to the pets of the troops. Dogs are cats are frequently killed due to the excuse it's for health reasons. The troops go out and when they come back their dogs and cats have been killed. Of course, worse treatment of horses/mules abandoned by the military in WWI and WWII happened.

    In Vietnam dogs were abandoned in-country. Supposedly due to diseases in the area they claimed they were afraid would be spread to the US (e.g. TCP Tropical Canine Pancytopenia).

    Luckily, there are a few groups who rescue the animals in Iraq for the troops and get them back to the US.
    "Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc"



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2010
    Location
    All 'round Canadia
    Posts
    5,955

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Trakehner View Post
    The military has been terrible to the pets of the troops. Dogs are cats are frequently killed due to the excuse it's for health reasons. The troops go out and when they come back their dogs and cats have been killed.
    That's because they're NOT pets! Soldiers aren't supposed to feed the freaking strays. Troops adopt them as "pets" against orders and then whine when poor PMeds have to go around killing the things. How do you think the PMeds feel, having to do that shit because people can't follow simple orders?

    They won't shrivel up and die if they can't have a kitteh during their tour. And the sheer amount of money needed to legally rescue one of those animals and bring it over to the US is ridiculous, there are plenty of doggies to save right stateside.

    (Although that mongoose one troop bought and built a huge interlocking caging system for was pretty awesome, I'll admit. Its name is/was Sketch, and a tally of its "kills" was kept updated on a wooded board. I have pics of it somewhere).



  12. #12
    Join Date
    May. 15, 2005
    Location
    Australasia
    Posts
    1,204

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coanteen View Post
    They won't shrivel up and die if they can't have a kitteh during their tour.
    Maybe not but it might make for a lot less psychological issues. I do feel sorry for the PMeds who have to do the killing.
    where am I, what day is it, am I still having a good time?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 20, 2010
    Location
    All 'round Canadia
    Posts
    5,955

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Horse with No Name View Post
    Maybe not but it might make for a lot less psychological issues. I do feel sorry for the PMeds who have to do the killing.
    Or for more. My friends were feeding one cute young dog (feeding it by their living quarters but not letting it go in). A pack of larger dogs get wind of the food and tore the puppy apart, and then they had to round up and kill the pack.

    Another group on base got a cat with kittens (or maybe it gave birth after they got it, not sure). They brought in into their living area. The person who reported it was one of them, who was allergic - these were tight group quarters, and that soldier was fucking terrified that the rest of his friends would find out he reported the cat and would shun him for it. He suffered the allergy symptoms for weeks until he finally broke down and told PMed.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2005
    Location
    Aiken SC / Fay NC
    Posts
    5,371

    Default

    Most of the dogs are still euth'd unfortunately
    FREE TACK/APPAREL ADS: BITS AND BARTER BOARD: http://bitsandbarter.proboards.com/i...ay&thread=5450



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2005
    Location
    Aiken SC / Fay NC
    Posts
    5,371

    Default

    A soldier (who was not supposed to be housing strays) recently died from rabies, after a bite from an unvaccinated dog in the desert.
    FREE TACK/APPAREL ADS: BITS AND BARTER BOARD: http://bitsandbarter.proboards.com/i...ay&thread=5450



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA USA
    Posts
    6,546

    Default

    Thank you for starting this thread. There's a FB page: https://www.facebook.com/MilitaryWor...ptions?fref=ts

    Monument info here: http://www.jbmf.us/


    1 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. The Lost Dogs, Michael Vick's dogs by Jim Gorant
    By threedogpack in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: Oct. 14, 2013, 11:19 AM
  2. Replies: 19
    Last Post: Aug. 30, 2011, 03:46 PM
  3. Replies: 17
    Last Post: Jan. 17, 2011, 04:22 PM
  4. Bloodhounds as farm dogs? Hardy enough to be outdoor dogs?
    By asb_own_me in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: Oct. 9, 2009, 04:14 PM
  5. Men with dogs vs. Women with dogs: A dilemma
    By Haalter in forum Around The Farm
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: Jul. 22, 2009, 03:58 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •