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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 1, 2002
    Location
    Indiana
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    11,469

    Default Hurricane Sandy and the TV show Revolution

    I've been really enjoying the show Revolution, a television show set 15 years after all the eletricity shuts down mysteriously and never turns back on. The show deals with what happens in the days and months after the power goes off, and how civilization moves on 15 years later.

    I hope some of you don't think I'm trying to trivialize the situation in NY from Sandy, but now when I watch the show it gives me a queasy feeling.

    It has been less then a week since many people lost their power, and most of those people who refused to leave were ill prepared to weather even a few days without electricity. Without elevators and smart phones they seem to have devolved into looting and fighting for gasoline at the few stations that are working.

    It may just be the media coverage, but don't people realize that it takes time to rebuild what was destroyed and to get gasoline and electricty back into those areas?

    It makes me realize that the makers of a TV show aren't that far off when they talk about peple fleeing the cities and the mass riots and deaths in the first few months after the black out.


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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2008
    Posts
    3,417

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by enjoytheride View Post

    It has been less then a week since many people lost their power, and most of those people who refused to leave were ill prepared to weather even a few days without electricity. Without elevators and smart phones they seem to have devolved into looting and fighting for gasoline at the few stations that are working.

    It may just be the media coverage, but don't people realize that it takes time to rebuild what was destroyed and to get gasoline and electricty back into those areas?

    It makes me realize that the makers of a TV show aren't that far off when they talk about peple fleeing the cities and the mass riots and deaths in the first few months after the black out.
    Sadly, I don't think those shows are that far off. I also think the "grid" is much more fragile than everyone would like to believe.
    Jigga:
    Why must you chastise my brilliant idea with facts and logic? **picks up toys (and wine) and goes home**



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,668

    Default

    We all become very used to our individual lifestyles. And certain (different) levels of comfort.

    I think we all feel varying degrees of worry/angst when there's any major changes that disrupt our comfort levels. People in cities or very populated suburban areas would be used to much more convenience than other places. They also have more resources at hand so any interruptions are usually short lived, and disasters are very few. And due to that very few will (or even have the ability to) be prepared for an extended power outage.

    So for areas of NY to go into panic mode and react badly probably isn't odd. I see huge swings in how people react in areas of CT...last year we had 2 week long power outages. Thee more urban or populated the area, the worse the public reaction was. Despite those areas being returned to power generally much faster than the rural ones. However the rural people, by and large, had more generators and excess fuel storage and wood stoves, etc to deal with the problem. Also seems the more rural you are, the closer the neighbor relationships seem to be and there's a bit more helping out between neighbors maybe.

    But we do all get used to certain things and I catch myself ranting sometimes at the microwave for taking too long to heat something up. And I'm old enough to remember when re-heating something required preheating the oven first and waiting forever. And now? 1 minute feels too long sometimes.

    Heck, if I use dial up internet it frustrates the heck out of me, LOL!
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2000
    Posts
    2,498

    Default

    That's pretty much how it was here after Katrina. I'm in a rural area, and basically everyone took care of themselves and helped out their friends/neighbors. We cleared our own roads, we didn't wait for the government. Hey, we had our own tractors, bulldozers and chainsaws.

    We were without power for a month. For the first few days, we had to go 80 miles to find a place with power and gas. Then there were lines at the gas stations here (town got power back first) but no anger or fights. People did get pissed at the power company, but they had something like 5000 miles of lines to restring! Mostly we were mad at their lack of communication.

    One interesting thing was they banned the sale of alcohol for awhile after the storm. Probably went a long way in keeping the peace!


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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2011
    Location
    The Land of Buggies and Black Bumpers
    Posts
    1,049

    Default

    I wonder if here in the northeast we have been lucky for so long, we've forgotten how to deal with natural disasters like Sandy. We were overprepared here because we were without power for 6-7 days after Irene last year and then got slammed by Lee and inundated with water. I can do without a lot of things, but must have unlimited water for our animals- we raise pigs addition to keeping horses.

    I felt like we learned from our experience last year and made changes so that we are more self sufficient and can live off the grid for an extended period of time.

    I think if you talked to Katrina survivors they would tell you that we got off easy and they may be right.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2004
    Location
    Posts
    1,115

    Cool

    I think people can deal without for a few days, then it starts to wear thin. Right after the storm, the news was all focused on the damage and destruction. Really not much on the people. I think urban people are more use to everything just being there. That's why they live there. Rural people know they are on their own to a certain extent. It's always worse a few days in when the focus is taken off and the shock wears off.

    I've watched the TV show and things just look to good for "15 yrs later" The girls clothes for instance. Buildings etc. Also the people are way to naive to have survived for 15 yrs. I think the premise is interesting but the show is kinda half done. (like a high school production of something when they have limited resources).

    I hang on to books, text books, DIY books just for this reason. I also have a hard time throwing out things I "might" need in just such a situation.


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