The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 71
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2004
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    7,676

    Default

    We are getting a lot of coverage here in Canada because we were also affected by Sandy. The Canadian networks carry info and footage about Sandy in NYC and NJ and of course, in my area, we have access to all the northern NY stations as well. So the coverage is extensive and Katrina was also covered extensively. There was so much unknown for so long in NO though...

    However, I am sure people in NJ, Staten Island, etc. do not feel that help is coming soon enough. Where are all these people go? I cannot believe the destruction...



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2003
    Location
    Sanger, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,818

    Default

    It's only been a few days....Katrina was covered and covered, especially since it was so poorly handled. The governor at the time refused Federal help before hand, the mayor didn't do much to get folks out (remember the pictures of dozens of school buses sitting in flood waters) and not much was in place before hand to shelter those who couldn't/wouldn't leave. The lower areas flooded because the levee system couldn't handle the storm surge. Upgrading them had been put off for years. Surrounding states took in bunches of displaced people.

    Alabama and Mississippi were equally, if not more, hard hit but their governors were better prepared and handled the aftermath better.

    Think we will be hearing about Sandy for quite a while, especially since repairing the subway systems, bridges, etc. is going to take a long, long time. The damage under the cities has yet to be totally assessed. New Orleans doesn't have that type of infrastrature...they can't even bury their dead below ground in some areas because of the water table.
    Julie
    www.centaurfencing.com
    Safer, Stronger, Lasts Longer!
    Godspeed BARBARO--Run fast and free!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2011
    Posts
    1,038

    Default

    Katrina was covered 7x24 when it happened. I think with this storm it affected millions more people than Katrina did. The population centers from Cy to DC are orders of magnitude higher than NO. As someone mentioned above, the infrastructure systems are more complex and run deep underground.

    Pumping out the road tunnels alone will take several days never mind subway stations and tunnels.

    People not in the area don't realize the NJ transit and NY transit systems move millions of people in and out of the city. When they are not working, there is no alternative.
    "I couldn't find my keys, so I put her in the trunk"



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,468

    Default

    There was plenty of coverage of Katrina, I really don't perceive Sandy getting more, even though I'm much closer, geographically, to Sandy's damage and we had some moderate damage in our own state and town.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,468

    Default

    Oh, and as far as the federal response goes...sure, we learned a few things, but we also have an actual emergency management professional running FEMA now, imagine that.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2005
    Location
    Aiken SC / Fay NC
    Posts
    5,367

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by west5 View Post
    I'm not trying to be contrary here but Charleston has a population of under 200,000 people. Even with damage in surrounding areas the numbers just don't come close.

    Last newscast I watched I think it added up to over 3,000,000 people without power.

    For all the people who have lost their life, their loved ones, their homes to flood waters or fires it is all terrible. It doesn't matter whether it happened during Hugo or Sandy.

    I'm not sure why the original poster had to turn it into a "contest"
    .



    I'm not the OP....? But, yes, no matter what "it" is that happens, the response is always "bigger" in the NYC area. There are also a lot of the national news outlets IN NYC, so it makes it easier to cover. You also left out the part where I said this is absolutely bad. FYI, I have plenty of family up here - still without power since Monday (NJ and CT seaboard), entire parts of towns wiped out.
    FREE TACK/APPAREL ADS: BITS AND BARTER BOARD: http://bitsandbarter.proboards.com/i...ay&thread=5450



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 14, 2005
    Location
    Aiken SC / Fay NC
    Posts
    5,367

    Default

    FEMA response in the past has been a joke (have personal experience on that front from Hurricanes and 2011 tornado) so I am really glad to see they got MUCH faster/better this time.
    FREE TACK/APPAREL ADS: BITS AND BARTER BOARD: http://bitsandbarter.proboards.com/i...ay&thread=5450


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2007
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,050

    Default

    Half of Manhattan, half! is out of power. I am working on emergency recovery for my agency and drove from Wall street area in pitch darkness all the way up to 42nd street. Staten Island lost 22 people.
    NY has many things Katrina didnt have. A huge police force well trained and well deployed, so far no looting in Manhattan. A mayor and governor that deployed immediately. And powerful rich companies who can get the ball rolling to restore services.
    90 % of long island has no power. My house has no power and no heat and temps are in the 40s. I am staying in an apartment of a friend, but my Mom is 88 and there is no heat in the house. Getting gas is beginning to become a problem.
    Lower Manhattan has a lot of residents now, after 9/11 people moved there into buildings that were once financial companies. And those residents live in high towers with no elevator, water and no food in their neighborhoods.
    I think 9/11 gave us some experience with dealing with disasters.
    The Red Cross is not getting good marks from Staten Island.
    I know this post is contradictory.. I'm just rambling before going back down to work.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2010
    Posts
    2,342

    Default

    If I remember correctly, the coverage for Katrina seemed to go on for YEARS. OP is in eastern Canada, so any US stations I'm assuming are in a reasonably close proximity to NYC. Local news gets more coverage than that happening several hundred miles away. There is also the reality that the workings of NYC affect millions, not only the residents, but most of the rest of us through the stock markets, etc. NO doesn't have near the national impact.

    The major difference I see is that the people in NJ are willing to leave their flooded homes, where so many in NO wouldn't.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2012
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    2,246

    Default

    Coverage of Katrina was extensive! There were a million aspects to the story-the animals! The people floating! Not being able to LEAVE NO! the homeless! Biloxi and the whole Gulf! People took in families who were displaced! Sandy is huge as well-they may be sending my husband and linecrews from Montana off to help with all the other crews, the devastation is overwhelming, and not just NYC but the whole coast. Hugo,Andrew, Irene- they're all nightmares if you are impacted and the clean ups certainly outlast people's attention span as far as "coverage" goes. New Yorkers and east coasters are well acquainted with hurricanes but there is only so much one can do.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2006
    Posts
    621

    Default

    Katrina got tons of coverage. If anything I think the Sandy coverage is toned down a bit, even though Sandy affected more residents due to the enormous population of the NY/NJ corridor. It's more about inconvenience than tragedy although of course there is tragedy too.

    Katrina killed nearly 2,000 people and changed the landscape of LA/MS forever. Sandy will have some lasting impact, but I'm not sure it'll be as long-term catastrophic as Katrina.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2002
    Location
    Berlin, Germany
    Posts
    2,537

    Default

    Please keep in mind that while hurricane Sandy is absolutely catastrophic in the damage it's done to infrastructure, Katrina caused at least 1,833 deaths when all was said and done. Currently, the death toll from Sandy is at 92. While this number is likely to rise, the loss of human life is going to be nowhere near what it was back in '05 with Katrina.

    There's a lot of oversimplification going on here. These hurricanes hit two completely different socioeconomic areas of the US. Evacuation orders given during Katrina were not met with generalized "unwillingness"- they were often met with an inability to evacuate because there was no public transit system to leave the area, and many residents didn't have transport to leave to area. Many of the people that were stuck in New Orleans during Katrina couldn't leave (if you really want a stomach turner, read about the Gretna controversy). Understand that NYC and its outlying areas are some of the most well prepared areas of the world for mass evacuations.

    They are also some of the most financially vested areas for the US, and the recovery of this region will be swift.
    Here today, gone tomorrow...


    6 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2012
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    2,246

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FrenchFrytheEqHorse View Post
    . Evacuation orders given during Katrina were not met with generalized "unwillingness"- they were often met with an inability to evacuate because there was no public transit system to leave the area, and many residents didn't have transport to leave to area. Many of the people that were stuck in New Orleans during Katrina couldn't leave .
    So,so true!! Particularly about the public transportation system. also, as far as help getting in, I know they are weighing trucks for air transport, and trying to figure out crew availability, allof which takes time, too much,unfortunately, but there is a lot to getting other crews on the spot.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2006
    Posts
    5,045

    Default

    Me too...I remember quite a bit of coverage of Katrina. I sat watched endless hours on CNN for days.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2011
    Location
    Huntsville, AL
    Posts
    81

    Default

    My main comparison thought was if Sandy caused this many problems I'd hate to see what would have happened with a storm even half of Katrina's strength. Hopefully that will never happen.



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2006
    Posts
    5,045

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by over the moon View Post
    I guess I shouldn't necessarily say media coverage (though I am noticed a LOT more coverage on Sandy than Katrina, based off American stations). Maybe response time, or reaction, or overall emergency relief. It seems that the response time for Sandy is much faster than for Katrina. Is it because Katrina taught valuable lessons? Different presidents? Or is it because Sandy hit New York? Genuinely, I am curious to hear people's thoughts.

    I do wish to emphasize that I am not meaning to belittle the damage Sandy did; there is no mistaking that it is a tragedy. There just seems to be a disconnect between Sandy and Katrina, and it seems quite skewed.
    Oh Geez, please don't turn this into politics.

    Katrina was a horrific disaster and it was very difficult for rescue teams to get in. Granted, I don't think our government did a great job with Katrina, but I think it certainly was a situation where you were learning hands on.

    Different cities, different scenerios/problems. Hopefully, we did learn something from Katrina that has helped the relief efforts for NY city



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Aug. 5, 2006
    Posts
    5,045

    Default

    Very true Chall....I think NY has certainly had it's share of disasters and have always had good leaders handling the situation.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
    Location
    Where humidity isn't just a word, it's a way of life.
    Posts
    725

    Default

    I think a HUGE part of the difference in response times is access. On the east coast, there is already massive amounts of heavy equipment, large numbers of trained personnel within the vicinity, and the access was not early as badly damaged.

    People always mention how well MS and AL handled the Katrina recovery compared to NO , but there is a large difference in an area where the water leaves again almost immediately, and a large bowl where the water can't escape and much of the access is limited due to damaged bridges and infrastructure.

    And while plenty of people could not leave NO, many also chose to stay instead of evacuating yet again "for nothing" (Peter and the Wolf) This also happened in MS; people didn't evacuate "because storms always bypass us". No one thought the levees would breach as they did, that the pumps wouldn't handle it, that the damage would possibly be that great. Right after the storm, many were celebrating having dodged the bullet again....and then the water came up. Since that storm, planning for evacuations and the willingness to leave has increased everywhere.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 1999
    Location
    Harrisburg, PA USA
    Posts
    5,689

    Default

    Katrina was enormously covered here. In no way do I see Sandy getting more coverage than Katrina did. I do think New Orleans got far more coverage than other areas devastated, but the coverage as a whole? Enormous.

    Also, like this storm, it was coming for days. I remember watching the news of it coming across the Gulf and meteorologists insisting it would be bad. People just didn't believe it and didn't properly prepare.



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2009
    Location
    Northern Virginia
    Posts
    1,146

    Default

    Agree with others that news coverage appears to be equal for both. Katrina happened in 2005. Perhaps the OP just forgot about the days/weeks/months of media coverage from back then.

    Please, lets not turn this tragedy into politics - South vs. North, Bush vs. Obama, etc.



Similar Threads

  1. Hurricane Katrina- It's been 5 years-
    By elysian*fields*farm in forum Off Course
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: Aug. 31, 2010, 09:34 PM
  2. Replies: 249
    Last Post: Oct. 15, 2005, 12:18 AM
  3. Who'll hit the road for Katrina assistance?
    By BeastieSlave in forum Off Course
    Replies: 378
    Last Post: Oct. 8, 2005, 09:32 PM
  4. REFUGE FROM KATRINA
    By tirnanog in forum Off Course
    Replies: 153
    Last Post: Sep. 8, 2005, 05:25 PM
  5. Hurrican Katrina - Not sure what to do
    By Bopper in forum Off Course
    Replies: 252
    Last Post: Sep. 1, 2005, 06:34 AM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •