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  1. #21
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    May. 14, 2008
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    Has anyone found it difficult to eliminate run on sentences in the Summary/Objective section? I am sure this is frowned upon, but there are only so many word options when trying to market yourself and using industry buzz words !



  2. #22
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    Oct. 1, 2004
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    Magnolia, TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by SuperAlter View Post
    Has anyone found it difficult to eliminate run on sentences in the Summary/Objective section? I am sure this is frowned upon, but there are only so many word options when trying to market yourself and using industry buzz words !
    An objective should be no more than one sentence. A summary can be 2-3 sentences or more/less a long list. I would generally avoid buzzwords though. There is real experience to be summarized, and there is fluff. Fluff is easily recognizable and may do you more harm than good.
    Jer 29: 11-13



  3. #23
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    Mar. 30, 2009
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    CA to Costa Rica to WI
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    Quote Originally Posted by axl View Post
    Arrgh! Action words! Self-description and self-praise are so hard for me! I'm a smart, articulate, hard worker who can do just about anything with very little supervision and a tiny bit of training. I also didn't quite finish my (pretty useless) English degree and have spent the last 12 years in 2 crappy jobs mostly because I have zero idea of how to market myself. Since I'm moving for SO's job, I'm seriously considering just starting with a temp agency so employers can get to know me outside a piece of paper.

    I had a pro help me write a resume last time, and it was still awful. There MUST be a way to explain that I'd be an asset in any position that doesn't require prior knowledge, but I feel completely powerless to present that on a piece of paper, unless I could just write it like I explained it here.
    What helped me (although it is time consuming), is I printed out one of those "Great Résumé Words" lists. Then I went through and highlighted all the words/skills that described me. Finally I went back through and found my strongest ones that I could use to jump start a bullet point for my past jobs.

    If you already have a resume, I would look at what you have listed and see if utilizing some of the words on the list will give your resume that extra punch it needs.
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    Fourteen Months Living and Working in Costa Rica



  4. #24
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    May. 14, 2008
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    302

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    Thanks for the suggestion!

    I will be monitoring this closely. I have been searching for quite some time. Although, already being employed (with a really great company, just a lousy department) has allowed me to be somewhat picky.

    I am getting to the point that my sanity is worth more however and have started searching aggressively.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2009
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    4,725

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    This probably only applies to a handful of people who may happen across this thread, but for attorney resumes, I recommend sticking with one page. As someone who sometimes has to review attorney resumes - I'm not going to look at anything other than where you went to school (and GPA, honors, etc.), the other law firms you have worked at, the practice group you were in there, and any special areas of expertise within the field you may have developed.

    Attorney resumes, especially for lateral hires, are mostly reviewed by other attorneys. If you tell me you worked in the bankruptcy department at Kirkland & Ellis, I know what that means and so does any other bankruptcy attorney in the U.S. You don't need to be especially descriptive about it.

    That's my opinion, anyway. I don't want to read through pages and pages of resume for one person!



  6. #26
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    Sep. 19, 2008
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    Half past the point of oblivion
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    925

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    Quote Originally Posted by Wonders12 View Post
    What helped me (although it is time consuming), is I printed out one of those "Great Résumé Words" lists. Then I went through and highlighted all the words/skills that described me. Finally I went back through and found my strongest ones that I could use to jump start a bullet point for my past jobs.

    If you already have a resume, I would look at what you have listed and see if utilizing some of the words on the list will give your resume that extra punch it needs.
    This is a fabulous suggestion, I will definitely do this. Thank you!
    Holy crap, how does Darwin keep missing you? ~Lauruffian



  7. #27
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    Feb. 18, 2012
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    Eugene, OR
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    Quote Originally Posted by sketcher View Post
    I recently had a friend who wanted to apply to two different positions at one company and her resumes were tailored to each position since each position required significantly different focus on her competencies. But when you go to the website there is only opportunity to submit one resume. The problem is that a generic resume would likely not get the attention of HR - both were training positions - one very technical and primarily delivery and one corporate level, regulatory and compliance including development and she had plenty of info pertaining to each but very difficult to write one resume. How do you handle cases such as this?
    *Disclaimer, I work for a company that 1. doesn't use an automated electronic hiring system and 2. lets employees submit a resume for each position they apply for if they so choose.

    I would say that if you are only allowed to submit one resume no matter how many positions you are applying for at a given company, then there are three approaches. I'll list them in the order from best to worst (my opinion only, YMMV).

    First option, stretch the rules on length a bit to include relevant skills for both positions.

    Second option would be to pick the job you are most suited for and tailor your resume to that position. The downside is you may not be considered for the other position.

    Third option is to submit the generic resume and hope that it catches someone's eye in HR.
    Last edited by Thoroughbred in Color; Nov. 2, 2012 at 03:03 PM. Reason: missing quote
    It is only through labor and painful effort, by grim energy and resolute courage, that we move on to better things.
    Theodore Roosevelt



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