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  1. #21
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    Feb. 14, 2010
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    Southeast NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by rivenoak View Post
    Thank you for sharing this.

    How did you go about having her tested? Through the school and/or privately? How did you locate a doctor? What did you ask to have tested?

    Is the school providing any services or accommodations? Anything you are just doing yourself when you are with her?

    BTW, anyone who'd like to respond via PM, feel free. I know this can be really putting yourself out there & I appreciate info from everyone!

    Time to go get the kiddo...back again later.
    I got her tested through her private therapist before insurance changed. Testing was done at the urging of her teacher. Didn't want to do it through the school system. Had her tested for ADD/ADHD. She does have dyslexia. And her fits are downright scary. Would physically attack whoever was in her way. I have had bruises before. I even record her with my cell phone when she is in a rage. Thankfully neighbors know and have seen her through her fits. It's not easy having a kid like this, especially when she is in one of her moods. The school doesn't provide anything. Lucky for us though she seems to end up with teachers who are able to handle her. But with each new school year I fret.

    When home with me, we try not to engage her temper and provide stability. When she is in her attack mode I usually just grab her from behind and sit down in the middle of the floor and hold on till it passes. It totally stinks but I love her no matter what. I was told I would never have kids and had the miscarriages to prove it, so I cherish her. I just hope that sooner vs later she can get the medicine she needs before anything truly bad happens. But I can't force her dad's hand at this time.

    (Sorry for any typos or missing words, on my phone)



  2. #22
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    Oct. 26, 2000
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    Tempe, AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    I have been hard of hearing all my life and as a kid, I had to sit in the front to even half stay up with what was going on.
    Even then, it was a hit and miss thing, which was fine with some helpful teachers, bad with other, very demanding ones, that didn't understand.
    So far, we've had no problems with him sitting up front, although that's not where he'd like to be. I expect more resistance from teachers as he gets older, especially if they like kids arranged alphabetically or some such.

    What kind of hearing loss do you have?

    As it turns out, I now have a loss. But, mine is different than his. It's pretty much a flat line around 35 dB, IIRC. So, I am learning first hand some of the frustrations of not hearing people.
    ~ Horse Box Lovers Clique ~



  3. #23
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    Oct. 26, 2000
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    Tempe, AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Misocksgal View Post
    I let them know that I was their ally. And to let me know the moment there was a problem...It took a lot of research and management on my part. I also met with teachers to see if they felt as if they could handle her needs - before she was assigned to them. I had a very understanding administration and teaching staff - thankfully.
    Words of wisdom!

    I definitely let the teachers/staff know that I am here to support them. Communication hasn't always been a strong point on their end, but is improving.

    He's gone through two teachers in K and now two in 1st grade. We had to reassign him at the holidays last year because the 1st classroom wasn't working. Unfortunately, we had carefully chosen his 1st teacher for this year, only for her to have a family situation. I hope next year is not as rough.
    ~ Horse Box Lovers Clique ~



  4. #24
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    Oct. 26, 2000
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    Tempe, AZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Logical View Post
    Lucky for us though she seems to end up with teachers who are able to handle her...When home with me, we try not to engage her temper and provide stability.
    Do you know if they are using any particular techniques?

    I never explain this well, but I don't get as much static from DS because I rarely come at him front-on. He escalates very quickly if he feels directed. I try to do things from the side. Kind of like easing up on a horse in the pasture when you know they don't like being caught!

    He hasn't injured us yet, but is certainly capable of it. He throws chairs at school, hides under tables, and apparently found a broken table leg yesterday that he was brandishing.

    The one place he never really acts out is at karate. Sensei is 6'1", 250# of "respect me" and DS responds to that. He gets in trouble on occasion and has to sit on the wall, and had his belt taken away once, but is more in control there than anywhere else I've seen him.

    He's been written up a number of times at school for what sounds like defending himself. He's not an instigator, but has repeatedly punched other kids for doing things like sitting on him. I sometimes feel like the school is scapegoating him & starting to expect bad things from what is really a good, smart, funny kid.
    ~ Horse Box Lovers Clique ~



  5. #25
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by rivenoak View Post
    So far, we've had no problems with him sitting up front, although that's not where he'd like to be. I expect more resistance from teachers as he gets older, especially if they like kids arranged alphabetically or some such.

    What kind of hearing loss do you have?

    As it turns out, I now have a loss. But, mine is different than his. It's pretty much a flat line around 35 dB, IIRC. So, I am learning first hand some of the frustrations of not hearing people.
    I too used to hide under chairs, but never was aggressive to anyone, still am not, ever, always extremely calm, which is great training horses, they respond to that very well, they love consistency.

    I was diagnosed with central auditory processing disorder and have a medical dispensation file in the court house so I don't get called in for jury duty.
    Imagine if you were in there being charged with something and those in the jury don't hear what is being said.
    No, you don't want that.

    That is also why my last movie was in 1972 and don't watch TV, can't hear well enough to get what is being said.
    Now, the news, talking heads, that I can follow well.

    I think that your kid may have some they have to diagnose and being partially deaf may be a co-morbidity, not really the central part of his problems, for what you say.

    Keep trying to get him checked over well, until you have a diagnosis and plan that you think is right for him.

    I expect you are familiar with this?

    http://www.wrightslaw.com/



  6. #26
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    Mar. 27, 2008
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    My BiL was almost shipped off to military school. I'm going to post a link to a fitting Calvin and Hobbes cartoon. This was him:
    http://i.imgur.com/P6bwL.gif

    He was eventually diagnosed with ADD and the drugs snapped him out of it. He could finally focus, and ended up doing very well in school. He is a super guy who just needed a bit of help.
    You are what you dare.



  7. #27
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    Sep. 21, 2008
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    Upstate NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by rivenoak View Post
    That sums him up. Believe you me, he knows how to behave, but can't or won't. He's a handful at home, but is multiples worse at school.

    The hearing loss plays some part. He currently will not wear his hearing aids, so he definitely misses things and then is probably mentally exhausted from trying to hear what he can all day long. If he's in a quiet, one on one situation, his comprehension is good (not without problems, but good). In a mainstream classroom? It's not an ideal situation for him.
    I would request a CSE meeting to propose a trial with an interpreter (full time) at school, for a long enough period of time to see if it decreases the behaviors (not less than a month for sure). AND I would request an FM system trial as well, if they arent already using one. Your son has a right to an education regardless of whether or not he chooses to wear his hearing aids.

    I know a child with deafness who hears well with cochlear implants, and the district wanted to deny an IEP and all services because he can hear. However, he needs to turn them off sometimes due to fatigue, cannot follow classroom/ peer conversations (too many voices) and the cafeteria/assemblies....forget it. His parents did a lot of legwork and research and now the child has a teacher for the deaf, interpreter, FM system, and speech/language support. He checks with the interpreter extensively, even with his implants turned on, because that way he doesn't miss anything.

    I don't know The state specific regs where you are...but don't let them take you for a ride!



  8. #28
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    Nov. 4, 2007
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    Aside from the support that he needs for his hearing challenges, you should also request a consult or support from a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA.) Most school districts (not sure about your state) have at least one on staff. They are specifically trained to address behavior challenges and may be able to identify some strategies that will help the teachers better manage his behavior.

    In some states, private insurance companies will also fund BCBA intervention either in-home or occasionally at school (with the school's permission.) This is dependent on the child's diagnosis, but may be useful at some point.

    Good luck, and I second the Wright's Law recommendation.



  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by rivenoak View Post
    He sees an itinerant teacher of the deaf (TOD) on a weekly basis. I think I will ask for more time with her.

    I'm not sure how we'd find or fit in a private tutor.

    He says the hearing aids hurt. It's taken a long time for him to explain further, but sometimes that means feedback, and sometimes it means irritation of the ear canal. He has new earmolds and we are working on him slowly building up a tolerance to wearing them again.

    He did watch a bit of tv with one on recently & was able to turn the volume down by half. So, I think he realized what a difference they can make. Up until then, I don't think he "knew" how much they could help.

    Does having everything amplified bother/tax you or can you screen out for what you want to hear? What kind of programs do you have on yours?
    I was really fortunate to attend school where my mom taught, so there was a continual parent-presence to make sure I got through the school day. HOWEVER, even at public school, I agree with other posters--don't let them take advantage of you. It stinks that the teachers have been rotating in and out--that can be really hard on kids, regardless of behavioral disorders.

    As for hearing aids, I have a phonak in-canal hearing aid, I think the ambra? It's whatever the highest-end one is. It cost a custom saddle--I was very, very fortunate that my parents decided to take a risk on me (and the hearing aid) and foot the bill in hopes that it would help my music. I'm studying opera, and so having a high-end hearing aid was vital to making sure music was crystal clear. Additionally, I did in-canal (against audiologist's advice) because nobody wants to see a singer with a hearing aid on stage. Sounds like a bad joke.

    The program on it is such that it automatically adjusts, and it has its own "zoom" to focus in on what it deems important I hear, whether it's the person in front of me or if a person is approaching from behind or to my side. For the most part, it is wonderful, but in loud orchestra settings, it sometimes gets over-loaded. The other thing is, if I'm singing in church during the communion and trying to hear the organ which is on my deaf side, it picks up the people's trampling feet headed to the altar, as that is apparently more important than the music. I have no say in what to listen to with my left ear, and I have been known to take the aid out if it chooses to zoom in on something I find obnoxious.

    Anywho, point of all that is, just because you get a high-end aid does not mean it works well! It took eight long, tedious months to get it fitted properly. We did about five molds (my left ear is an unusual shape to work with). I'm lucky to be an adult, and my ear no longer grows. This is not the same with kids. They grow constantly. And the molds end up not fitting quite right after a year and can cause a lot of discomfort, both physically and with feedback. What is his set up? The in-canal aids are notorious for having horrendous, painful feedback if not properly fitted, as I learned my first fitting.

    When I first got my aid, I was wretched. The feedback sounded terrible the whole time. I finally got my audiologist to hear what I was hearing after a week of torture, and she did a new mold and then did new settings. Seven months later we had a mold that fit right, but it still took me a month to adjust to the feedback. I had headaches, I was grouchy, I thought quiet rooms were loud. The audiologist was right, though--you have to commit to wearing them all the time for the first few weeks and then it gets better. Is there any chance he has another break coming up where he can be in a quieter atmosphere and adjust as opposed to wearing them whenever it's convenient (although that works, too)? Also, I had the volume turned down on mine at a very low setting to start and worked my way up. It meant more trips to the audiologist, but hearing is vital; it's not worth putting up with crappy sound or too loud/too soft.

    It was until August my hearing aid finally fit properly, and we'd gotten it programmed right to reduce feedback, particularly the screeching kind. Something to consider--when I sing, I use a lot of facial muscles. It turns out the movement was altering how my hearing aid sat in my ear, and all of a sudden I'd get screeching feedback while I was singing. When the audiologist was programming the noise-block (to cancel out feedback), she had make a bunch of different facial expressions. Since then, knock on wood, I haven't had any screeching from my ear while singing. If your boy has a wiggly face or likes to smile a lot, it might be shifting the molds and causing feedback.

    My only other piece of advice is more of a caveat--should you get him tested (and I think it's a good idea), do not go straight for medication afterwards. I strongly recommend seeing a cognitive/behavioral therapist first as well as addressing the hearing and develop a better plan before adding in medication. Medication can be beneficial, but it is better to add it later as a supplement than to begin with it and find it's a crutch. I say this from my former two years as a behavioral neuroscience major as well as a nanny/babysitter who's worked with a variety of kids who had behavioral issues (mostly on the autism spectrum).

    I have no idea if any of this helps, but I really do empathize with your kid. Hearing loss isn't supposed to happen when you're young. He is lucky to have caring and patient parents.



  10. #30
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pony+ an inch View Post
    I was really fortunate to attend school where my mom taught, so there was a continual parent-presence to make sure I got through the school day. HOWEVER, even at public school, I agree with other posters--don't let them take advantage of you. It stinks that the teachers have been rotating in and out--that can be really hard on kids, regardless of behavioral disorders.

    As for hearing aids, I have a phonak in-canal hearing aid, I think the ambra? It's whatever the highest-end one is. It cost a custom saddle--I was very, very fortunate that my parents decided to take a risk on me (and the hearing aid) and foot the bill in hopes that it would help my music. I'm studying opera, and so having a high-end hearing aid was vital to making sure music was crystal clear. Additionally, I did in-canal (against audiologist's advice) because nobody wants to see a singer with a hearing aid on stage. Sounds like a bad joke.

    The program on it is such that it automatically adjusts, and it has its own "zoom" to focus in on what it deems important I hear, whether it's the person in front of me or if a person is approaching from behind or to my side. For the most part, it is wonderful, but in loud orchestra settings, it sometimes gets over-loaded. The other thing is, if I'm singing in church during the communion and trying to hear the organ which is on my deaf side, it picks up the people's trampling feet headed to the altar, as that is apparently more important than the music. I have no say in what to listen to with my left ear, and I have been known to take the aid out if it chooses to zoom in on something I find obnoxious.

    Anywho, point of all that is, just because you get a high-end aid does not mean it works well! It took eight long, tedious months to get it fitted properly. We did about five molds (my left ear is an unusual shape to work with). I'm lucky to be an adult, and my ear no longer grows. This is not the same with kids. They grow constantly. And the molds end up not fitting quite right after a year and can cause a lot of discomfort, both physically and with feedback. What is his set up? The in-canal aids are notorious for having horrendous, painful feedback if not properly fitted, as I learned my first fitting.

    When I first got my aid, I was wretched. The feedback sounded terrible the whole time. I finally got my audiologist to hear what I was hearing after a week of torture, and she did a new mold and then did new settings. Seven months later we had a mold that fit right, but it still took me a month to adjust to the feedback. I had headaches, I was grouchy, I thought quiet rooms were loud. The audiologist was right, though--you have to commit to wearing them all the time for the first few weeks and then it gets better. Is there any chance he has another break coming up where he can be in a quieter atmosphere and adjust as opposed to wearing them whenever it's convenient (although that works, too)? Also, I had the volume turned down on mine at a very low setting to start and worked my way up. It meant more trips to the audiologist, but hearing is vital; it's not worth putting up with crappy sound or too loud/too soft.

    It was until August my hearing aid finally fit properly, and we'd gotten it programmed right to reduce feedback, particularly the screeching kind. Something to consider--when I sing, I use a lot of facial muscles. It turns out the movement was altering how my hearing aid sat in my ear, and all of a sudden I'd get screeching feedback while I was singing. When the audiologist was programming the noise-block (to cancel out feedback), she had make a bunch of different facial expressions. Since then, knock on wood, I haven't had any screeching from my ear while singing. If your boy has a wiggly face or likes to smile a lot, it might be shifting the molds and causing feedback.

    My only other piece of advice is more of a caveat--should you get him tested (and I think it's a good idea), do not go straight for medication afterwards. I strongly recommend seeing a cognitive/behavioral therapist first as well as addressing the hearing and develop a better plan before adding in medication. Medication can be beneficial, but it is better to add it later as a supplement than to begin with it and find it's a crutch. I say this from my former two years as a behavioral neuroscience major as well as a nanny/babysitter who's worked with a variety of kids who had behavioral issues (mostly on the autism spectrum).

    I have no idea if any of this helps, but I really do empathize with your kid. Hearing loss isn't supposed to happen when you're young. He is lucky to have caring and patient parents.
    That is very interesting, good information there.

    Still, consider that his problems hearing may be complicated with, as mine, the connection from the ears to the brain and there is no external hearing aid that can really help with that.

    I was completely deaf for 11 months when I was 2.
    To everyone's surprise, I regained some hearing after that, when they had completely given up on my hearing ever again, although I didn't hear too well, hardly at all with one ear.

    With music, it is hard, as the real sound seems "squashed", the notes on both ends sound a bit more and more off the further from that center, especially the higher ends of the scale.
    My brain seems to have learned to compensate for that, has a perfect pitch auto correct feature installed that lets me "hear" music in the way it is played, or how it is supposed to sound if played right, even if my ears don't hear it like that.

    There is so much to hearing and even more to not hearing good enough, it is not surprising some as little kids get frustrated and resort to meltdowns.
    He needs to learn to compensate and tricks to stay calm in the middle of internal chaos.
    The right medication will help, today's therapies even more.

    As you can see by the post quoted above and mine, each one of us is so different, your kid will have to find his own way also.
    Good luck, it is a lifetime effort, but I can say, he will grow up and learn to adapt more and more, although those early years are so hard on everyone, himself also.



  11. #31
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    Dec. 28, 2001
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    Raleigh
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    Quote Originally Posted by WombatCA View Post
    Aside from the support that he needs for his hearing challenges, you should also request a consult or support from a Board Certified Behavior Analyst (BCBA.) Most school districts (not sure about your state) have at least one on staff. They are specifically trained to address behavior challenges and may be able to identify some strategies that will help the teachers better manage his behavior.

    In some states, private insurance companies will also fund BCBA intervention either in-home or occasionally at school (with the school's permission.) This is dependent on the child's diagnosis, but may be useful at some point.

    Good luck, and I second the Wright's Law recommendation.


    As a Behavior Analyst, this is also what I would recommend to anyone with children that are engaging in severe behavior problems. To be warned, however, unless you are in a state that specifically requires insurance to pay for one, it is sometimes difficult to get insurance to pay for it. Also depending on your state/county, your school may not have one. I am in North Carolina, and I can't think of one school that has a BCBA on staff. In fact, the majority of the public school won't even allow us to come in to observe, offer suggestions or work with children, even if the parents are paying for it privately.



  12. #32
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    Oct. 26, 2000
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    Thank you all for the helpful information. I'm at work, so posting's hard, but I'm definitely reading.

    And yes, wrightslaw is a fantastic resource. I've got a couple of their books on a Kindle and need to do some re-reading.
    ~ Horse Box Lovers Clique ~



  13. #33
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    Feb. 25, 2012
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    Montana
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    Your boy is lucky to have an engaged and concerned parent!
    haven't read allthe comments so you may have done this, but it seems like
    he would benefit from a neuropsychological evaluation by someone (a neuropsychologist!) who is very familiar and experienced with processing disorders! Your son has enough complicating variables that he does sound like he needs a thorough assesment from someone who is experienced with the nuances of both processig disorders AND the impact of other issues (hearing loss, head trauma) and can make specific, behavioral recommenations. In many cases this is well beyond what school shrinks can do. We can't all be experts on everything. From what you describe, he may not have a processing disorder at all but be very frustrated and angry and lackingin ways to soothe himself and get his needs met! Wild temper tantrums, hard-to-soothe presentations (brandishing a chair leg??) are NOT typical of things like ADD (although us ADD'ers can be plenty testy). They are typical of other things, sometimes in ADDITION to ADD but usually INSTEAD of.

    And you probably know this but processing disorders are NOT the same as a conduct disorder. Sometimes kids with processing disorders can be at risk for developing CD but they are not the same thing.

    Good luck and hope you get soem support and relief!!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
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    Feb. 14, 2010
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    Southeast NC
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    Quote Originally Posted by rivenoak View Post
    Do you know if they are using any particular techniques?

    I never explain this well, but I don't get as much static from DS because I rarely come at him front-on. He escalates very quickly if he feels directed. I try to do things from the side. Kind of like easing up on a horse in the pasture when you know they don't like being caught!

    He hasn't injured us yet, but is certainly capable of it. He throws chairs at school, hides under tables, and apparently found a broken table leg yesterday that he was brandishing.

    He's been written up a number of times at school for what sounds like defending himself. He's not an instigator, but has repeatedly punched other kids for doing things like sitting on him. I sometimes feel like the school is scapegoating him & starting to expect bad things from what is really a good, smart, funny kid.
    Not any particular way of handling her, but instead of just immediately dismissing her for unruly behavior they let her work it out as long as it doesn't interfere with the rest of the class, but she has been sent to the principal's office before. One particular bad day the therapist at the school (the one she sees) was available for one of her fits. She was spinning around on the floor on her back screaming and yelling. Another time she attacked a kid with the fork I had packed for her for lunch. No more forks for her. She was harassed by another student for days before responding and just by luck the teachers were able to separate them. Both girls had battle wounds, but the other girl had a history of aggravating my kid and so she was punished. My child will intentionally do things to irritate other people and kids. And is also one to be picked on. If that makes any sense.

    She is worse at home than at school. Very rarely do we have a night with no fights and that only happens when someone else is over. She doesn't like to behave ugly in front of others for the most part. Last week while at the pub for my rehearsal dinner (yes, just got married in tropical storm Sandy) she went into women's bathroom (one room/one toilet) and emptied the can of febreeze she found. An hour later when I went to the bathroom, I realized what had happened and spent the rest of the night and most of the next day struggling to breathe! When I came out of the bathroom I asked her if she had sprayed the febreeze and she lied to me about it. (She lies a lot and rarely tells the truth, even about small things.) When I threatened to spank her right there and then for lying to me, she told me that she had done it. (Very easy to tell when she is lying and when she is telling the truth.) At which point I went into another coughing fit and had to go outside, my mother who heard everything took over and told her that she would have to apologize to the owner of the pub (my officiant!) and pay for it with her own money. She lost it. Attacked my mother, tried to run out of the pub and downright acted ugly. I absolutely hate it when she acts like this! But she eventually apologized to the waitress and gave her the money to replace the bottle. (fingers crossed she learned a lesson this time)

    It's not easy to have a difficult child. And I never realized just how bad she was until a baby-sat another little girl that was just happy-go-lucky and when she threw a temper it lasted maybe 30 seconds instead of the 2 hours I'm used to. Just breaks my heart to see my kid struggle like she does.



  15. #35
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    Severe meltdowns can be one sign of sensory integration disorders.
    May want to ask about checking for that can of worms.

    Being a bit that difficult kid, at least I was not having, or not permitted to have meltdowns.
    Our mother was scary, you didn't do anything to set HER off!
    Guess that the apple doesn't fall far from the tree, when it comes to dysfunctions.
    I would have never thought of lying, which in itself is a problem in today's society, that puts a premium on learning to be "diplomatic", meaning coating your words and even fibbing a bit here and there to get along.

    There is so much more known today, so much help out there.
    I wonder how kids that are a bit, to much different than the rest, will end up as adults, compared with our now old generation, where you swam or sank, lucky if you had a sensible environment, that helped protect you while you were in hot waters.

    For those adults that wonder why parents with difficult kids don't do more, remember, It could have been your kid, but for an accident of birth.
    Parenting, really, "it ain't easy" for anyone.
    Lets try to give them a bit of a break, when you really would want to wring that annoying kid's neck and give a good kick to it's parents.



  16. #36
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    I've had about 25 kids with conduct disorders, I am a foster parent.

    With all of the staffing changes at the school, you don't have to wait for the IEP meetings, when you learn of a change, schedule an appointment that week to go and meet the new person and talk to them about your son.

    It sounds as if the IEP is for learning support, because of his hearing. That needs to be reevaluated to include emotional support too. There are previsions in the IEP for how much time is spent in a support classroom rather than the main classroom, it sounds like it needs to be increased significantly.

    Every school district has a school psychologist, schedule for your son to be evaluated by him/her.

    A 7 year old should not be deciding whether or not to wear the hearing aids.



    I don't know which state you are in, but we have an Education Law Center in Pa, they give advise and can go to meetings with you to advocate for you and your son (all free). Call them and see if they can put you in contact with something similar in your state.

    http://www.elc-pa.org/index.html



  17. #37
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    Is there anyone at Gallaudet who could help you? They serve a huge population of deaf and hearing impaired kids and adults.

    One of the boys who went to school with my daughters is hearing impaired. He did well in the regular classroom, but the private school was small, the classes were small, and everyone knew about the hearing issue. Would he better off in an academically challenging private school with small classes, low noise levels and lower stress?



  18. #38
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    logical - your daughter needs meds NOW. Why do you need dad's approval? My daughter had very similar issues and after some serious meds she is finally in a good place. feel free to pm me if you want.

    Rivnoak - good luck, I have no experience with hearing loss and child behavior, but I am really wondering if he may have some adhd adding to his frustration. and I agree with others. He needs to wear the hearing aids, it should not be optional. Good luck.



  19. #39
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    I appreciate your concern for your child. However, based on what you posted, "He hasn't injured us yet, but is certainly capable of it. He throws chairs at school, hides under tables, and apparently found a broken table leg yesterday that he was brandishing.

    The one place he never really acts out is at karate. Sensei is 6'1", 250# of "respect me" and DS responds to that. He gets in trouble on occasion and has to sit on the wall, and had his belt taken away once, but is more in control there than anywhere else I've seen him.

    He's been written up a number of times at school for what sounds like defending himself. He's not an instigator, but has repeatedly punched other kids for doing things like sitting on him. I sometimes feel like the school is scapegoating him & starting to expect bad things from what is really a good, smart, funny kid."

    He does not belong in a regular ed classroom. Granted, I teach high school, so perhaps my behavior expectations are higher, and I suppose it depends on how many students are in the class, but how is a teacher supposed to handle a child brandishing a broken table leg with 27 other kids in the room who may be frightened or having their own drama. Any kid with this kind of behavior issue- should be in a small group setting for their needs, whether they be physical or emotional/behavioral.

    As a regular ed high school teacher, I see kids with IEPs all the time. And a lot of the time even though all the accommodations are being met, the kid is still struggling.


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  20. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by watcher View Post
    I would request a CSE meeting to propose a trial with an interpreter (full time) at school, for a long enough period of time to see if it decreases the behaviors (not less than a month for sure). AND I would request an FM system trial as well, if they arent already using one. Your son has a right to an education regardless of whether or not he chooses to wear his hearing aids.

    I know a child with deafness who hears well with cochlear implants, and the district wanted to deny an IEP and all services because he can hear. However, he needs to turn them off sometimes due to fatigue, cannot follow classroom/ peer conversations (too many voices) and the cafeteria/assemblies....forget it. His parents did a lot of legwork and research and now the child has a teacher for the deaf, interpreter, FM system, and speech/language support. He checks with the interpreter extensively, even with his implants turned on, because that way he doesn't miss anything.

    I don't know The state specific regs where you are...but don't let them take you for a ride!
    He does have an FM system. He's had it for two years.

    I like the idea of proposing a trial period of an interpreter. I'm not sure how they would measure if it's successful or not, but if they don't go for the idea of a full-time one, that might be a start.

    CIs, or hearing aids (HAs) don't take away the disability. If they're broken, not on, the person is still d/hh. Great that this kiddo is getting all of those accommodations.
    ~ Horse Box Lovers Clique ~



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