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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2008
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    Florida, USA
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    779

    Exclamation Anyone else- worried??

    Flame suit on!!

    I'm in my mid twenties and I can honestly say that I'm worried about the future of our society...

    I look around and I'm not "normal" for not having gone off to college and gotten drunk to the point of not remembering some evenings, had one night stands, etc. People seem to think I've missed out. Did attend college and graduate btw.

    Our education system has gone so far "by the boards" that when and if I have kids- I'd honestly contemplate home schooling them (read the home school thread and found it very heartwarming that I'm not the only one that feels this way).

    I heard on the radio this AM that a school got involved when a kid mentioned he wasn't allowed by a parent to dress up in whatever costume he wanted. Where is the cut off between government/school say so and good parenting?

    We over medicate the kids of today... a lot of them are raised in front of televisions and don't know the concept of sitting down as a family. Let's not even get started with manners and values!!! Some of the parenting I witness FREAKS me out!

    I KNOW that there are plenty of people that do things right... but I'm still worried that we're going off the deep end (or deeper than we were).

    I'm appalled by most of the things that happen on MTV (these people can't possibly be my age)... It seems like it is completely accepted by society that kids have kids, or that kids have sex or that people should be partying to the end of the night and not remember who they went home with.

    Biggest pet peeve: the mentality that is going on today where a lot of teenagers feel they have a sense of entitlement to things. You have to WORK to earn things...

    I REALLY REALLY hope that the future generations are strong enough that they can "fix" or undo some of the wrong that has been done... because it's getting scarier by the day!

    Ok- off the podium I go...
    Proudly living in my "let's save the world bubble"!



  2. #2
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    Jan. 2, 2006
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    Dallas, NC
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    Default

    I'm scared. The kids today feel they are entitled to everything. They don't know the concept of hard work or losing. And look at the show Honey Boo Boo, that child would have had the crap slapped out of her in my decade!
    I want a signature but I have nothing original to say except: "STHU and RIDE!!!

    Wonderful COTHER's I've met: belleellis, stefffic, snkstacres and janedoe726.



  3. #3
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    Jul. 31, 2007
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    I'm not scared so much as I have lowered my expectations.

    Sadly, I think it's rational for teens to be slackers. After all, they were raise in a kind of wealth that they will not be able to maintain as adults. That will be true not matter what they do, statistically speaking. So how would you convince that person to get all gung ho on education and working hard to get what you want? The glorious crescendo of wealth that their parents and grandparents got, and which was attributed to hard work, ain't comin' their way. And they'll feel that right out of the college gate when they can't service the debt that got them there.

    I'd like to think. however, that this (long) moment of belt-tightening means that people start to ask what they want to do during their time on earth. If you can't think of your life as a grand effort to acquire toys, what else is it for? What do you want to contribute to the world or experience while you are around?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  4. #4
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    Feb. 18, 2012
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    knee deep in Oregon mud
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    Default

    jumpingmaya - You are completely right to be worried. Like you I am educated and in my mid-twenties. I am an HR manager and have to interview these kids. They have no work ethic, they show up to interviews wearing inappropriate clothing, and think that the employer is there to serve them. I look at these people and can't believe that they are only a few years younger than me.

    Sometimes I think I'm one of the few people in America that still feels a sense of personal responsibility for my actions and pride in a job well done.
    It is only through labor and painful effort, by grim energy and resolute courage, that we move on to better things.
    Theodore Roosevelt



  5. #5
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    Aug. 6, 2002
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    NJ, USA
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    Default

    Well I'm a little less scared hearing someone your age is able to see the very things that scare me & realize how troublesome they are. So thanks!

    I'm hoping there are many more like you and that you will a) coax others of your generation to grow up & catch up in time to be useful members of society and b) you will reproduce & raise at least as many kids as the kids that never grow up do!



  6. #6
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    Jun. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    Default

    Like Arcadien, the fact that you see it bodes well in my mind.

    I think there are a lot of factor at play here. THat might be a reason, but it's not an excuse.

    I'll just speak of my situation...

    My step daughters are good kids. But I swear to God, the fact that their parents divorced has created so much parental post divorce guilt that until I came around, they were quite literally treated like guests in their own house. The now 14YO learned to use a BROOM last year. I kid you not.

    Their parents have been running around cleaning up after them, doing their laundry, and doing just about everything else for them BUT wiping their asses for the last 6 years.

    They have ZERO concept of money. They have NO desire to work even though they could. I put them in a babysitting certification class w/ the Red Cross last year. Do you think either of them will even try to babysit? nope. At their ages, I was babysitting every weekend night.

    They don't feel any responsibility to take care of their things either because things just get magically replaced when they lose them or break them.

    After many discussions with oldest SD about wearing her retainers/taking care to put them up, she lost them. I had to pay for new ones out of pocket. I told Dad he needed to find a way for her to work off that 300 bucks as I was NOT going to just replace them for nothing. That was a new one for everyone.

    School work is kind of the same. The kids are A students but what constitutes an A in this district is C work in my opinion. They are even allowed to use text speak in English papers now! It's "content graded". Spelling, punctuation, capitalization, etc are out the window.

    Music lessons became an issue in our house. I was paying for private lessons but the kids weren't practicing. They were just going to lessons. I finally told them that these lessons were a privilege and they required a sacrifice on my part. No extra horse stuff for me so I could pay for their music lessons. And if they didn't want to practice, then the lessons would stop. I let one (bad) recital go but told them that from then on, if they weren't prepared and practicing, those lessons would go away.

    I know. I'm an asshole. But the thing is, everything can't be all "I get what I want when I want it." THat's not how the world works!
    A good horseman doesn't have to tell anyone...the horse already knows.

    Might be a reason, never an excuse...



  7. #7
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    Jun. 7, 2002
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    It's even more scary when you consider our aging population. I work for a huge corporation and I don't see younger people coming through the ranks that will be able to replace the company leaders when they retire. How will our economy improve with nobody qualified to run our businesses? The younger generation isn't just compromising their own future, they won't be there for the rest of us when we are ready to retire and hand the reins over to qualified successors.
    \"Non-violence never solved anything.\" C. Montgomery Burns




  8. #8
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    Sep. 20, 2005
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    Eh, I only get worried when people like the OP put on their judgey pants with regard to the people around them. You aren't morally superior because you chose not to party with your peers. And I seriously doubt anybody thinks you'e weird because you chose to abstain - they probably just don't appreciate your condescending attitude.

    I agree with some of what you said, but I think you need to understand that there isn't one "right" way to do life.
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris



  9. #9
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Hey, I am closer to 70 than 60 and felt the same when I was your age and not a trend follower in my generation.
    I always marched to my own very different drummer.

    Perspective will teach you that, as much as things change, so many still stay the same.

    That means, people are people and come in all kinds.
    Those like us, those like others, all kinds of others and, well, somehow we keep on truckin' without falling apart at the seams.



  10. #10
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    Aug. 6, 2002
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    SNL I think you missed the crux of the OP's point. It wasn't that she didn't party through school & others did -

    It's that others in her peer group don't seem to realize now (mid twenties) is the time to begin pulling your own weight & taking responsibility for your actions. There's nothing "judgy pants" about that. It's just about facing reality in a mature fashion.

    If I were in the OP's shoes I'd be scared too, as if many more of her generation do not wake up & adopt her attitude, she's going to have to pull their weight too.



  11. #11
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    Feb. 28, 2007
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    SE Pennsylvania
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    I'm with you on this. In fact, we just had a conversation about it over the weekend! I'm also viewing it from a mid-twentys stand point and I just can't believe what I see around me a great deal of the time.

    I was brought up to work hard and be grateful for every opportunity. Now... forget about it! I would of slapped my young self if I acted like these "kids" do, and Im only a few years older then many of them. Ugh.
    -SW-
    Precious Few- 1998 OTTB



  12. #12
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    Sep. 20, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Arcadien View Post
    If I were in the OP's shoes I'd be scared too, as if many more of her generation do not wake up & adopt her attitude, she's going to have to pull their weight too.
    Like the OP, I am in my mid-twenties. I have two jobs (totaling over 45 hours a week) and I'm a full time grad student. I also go out to margaritas on Mondays with my friends, and occasionally hit the bars on the weekends. Party hard, work harder.

    I don't know a whole lot of people my age that don't work their butts off. Maybe it's the social circles I hang out with, who knows...

    My point is, maybe OP should put her head down and focus on her own work rather than judging everyone else and making generalizations akin to "I'm better than everyone else my age because..."

    Yeah, some people are lazy d-bags. But that isn't unique to any one generation.
    "Are you yawning? You don't ride well enough to yawn. I can yawn, because I ride better than you. Meredith Michael Beerbaum can yawn. But you? Not so much..."
    -George Morris



  13. #13
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    Mar. 17, 2006
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    544

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SaturdayNightLive View Post
    Like the OP, I am in my mid-twenties. I have two jobs (totaling over 45 hours a week) and I'm a full time grad student. I also go out to margaritas on Mondays with my friends, and occasionally hit the bars on the weekends. Party hard, work harder.

    I don't know a whole lot of people my age that don't work their butts off. Maybe it's the social circles I hang out with, who knows...

    My point is, maybe OP should put her head down and focus on her own work rather than judging everyone else and making generalizations akin to "I'm better than everyone else my age because..."

    Yeah, some people are lazy d-bags. But that isn't unique to any one generation.
    I agree. In my old job I was responsible for training new hires at various agencies. For the most part I found them to be very hardworking with a passion to do the job right. In my present job I work with people in their mid twenties. All of them are very hard working and intelligent. For the record, I am 56 years old and I think the future will be just fine. The OP is just a little too dramatic.



  14. #14
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    Mar. 30, 2006
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    I'm mid-twenties as well, and while I wouldn't say I am a slave to work by any means, I have a full time 9-5 job that pays the bills and is getting me where I want to go in life. I go out for drinks during the week on occasion and I tend to have a big night out on the weekend to "blow off steam" (although those are becoming tamer and tamer...*sigh*). Most of my friends are living similar lives, all of us of independent, living on our own, and making our way in life.

    As for parenting, yes a lot of that scares me and when I worked as a summer nanny in undergrad I learned some valuable lessons on how I want to be as a parent. But I think everyone feels that way and the younger generates are always worse "back in my day....". Now i know you're commenting on YOUR generation, but I think a lot of it applies. There are always going to be screw ups, but there are PLENTY of hard-working, functioning, upstanding citizens in their mid-twenties out there (and we even drink, smoke, and have one night stands! *GASP*)

    Plus, keep in mind that what is shown on MTV are extremes precisely because nobody wants to watch what really happens in reality.

    Jersey Shore with real people: "Let's go to the beach with a magazine then have girly cocktails before heading home to watch dirty dancing with popcorn because I want to feel social but working with a hang over is horrible and I care about my job."

    16 and Pregnant for real people: .....oh wait they used contraception.

    Is MTV anything like real life? No. Thank God. But it is awesome to make yourself feel better when you think you're not accomplishing enough in life yet ! So just see it as a confident booster and focus on your own business.



  15. #15
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    Oct. 20, 2008
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    Florida, USA
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    Thanks for all the responses...

    I didn't write much about myself (aka accomplishments, salary, social life, etc) because I didn't feel like it was relevant...

    Still feel like a lot of people's values as are generally consistently going down hill and that scares me.
    Glad that I'm not the only one. That being said, I agree with the whole "oh this generation is worse than the last one feeling"; I'm sure it happens for every single generation. My mom said she felt the same way in regards to people her age "back then". She also does agree though that she is glad all of her kids are "grown" and that she thinks it's harder to raise kids today than 10-15-20 years ago.

    To be fully honest, I didn't expect everyone to agree so I'm not surprised/offended by those of you who think I take myself "too seriously". Funny enough- I don't. Strive for better? Always

    Happy OT day to all!
    Proudly living in my "let's save the world bubble"!



  16. #16
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    "The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers." Socrates
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  17. #17
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    May. 28, 2006
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    Florida
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    I'm with OP...I'm in my early 20's, graduated, married, full time job. I had to grow up pretty young (relative term, I know) so by the time most of my friends were learning how to really party, or trying to decide what to do with their lives, I was already "settled". I've had tons of people judging me on getting married so young, that I should have taken more time to "live it up". But I didn't want to live it up, I like a nice quite life, I knew who I wanted to be with, I knew what I wanted out of life. It's not for everyone, but it works for us. Side note to the OP, I was homeschooled all the way up, PM if you'd like some more info

    True, there is no "right" way to live you life. There is no right age to start acting more responsible. But there is the general concept of "I need to take reponsibility for my actions, I am not entitled to an easy life, etc".

    I think the things that I am the most concerned about are

    1)lack of work ethic in young people- hence the entitlement comment. For those of you who work your tails off and then go party, great, that's good for you. But you're working your tails off. Lots of kids scoff at that. Or simply don't know how because they've never had to.

    2)lack of respect. It absolutely blew my mind how many people I heard in school saying to the teacher "You can't tell my what to do. Who are you to be bossing me around? I'll do whatever I want". Are you KIDDING me? You're voluntarily in school, to learn, and you want to get pissy with your professors? No thank you. Even if you disagree, you can do it respectfully.

    3) Honestly, I'm afraid of where parenting laws are going to go. I don't want this to turn into a "what is appropriate punishment" debate, but I will say that I am a firm believer in spanking. I am NOT saying beat or bruise kids, but a slap on the rear? You better believe it! It was done to me when I was young, and I deserved it, and I'm not a scarred, abused person. I turned out just fine, and I've seen a lot of other kids that would have turned out better if their parents had spanked once or twice.

    If you don't agree with it for your own kids, that's fine. But I am so afraid that as the years go on, and I have kids, that the laws will get tighter and tighter on what punishment is allowed. I saw a thing on Dr Phil (it was on at work, I'm not normally a fan) where a high school was grounded, but she snuck out of her house to go to a high school dance. Her mom went to the dance, and got a teacher/principle to help her find the kid. Kid started yelling at the mom, mom grabbed the girl's arm to take her home, girl pulled away and started pushing her mom, so mom grabbed the girl's hair to pull her away. The girl started PUNCHING the mother. I think she got hit like 40something times?

    Dr Phil said to the mother "How dare you for embarrassing her in front of her friends, I don't blame her for being violent, she learned it from you". Head desk.

    I just don't want to be told one day that even though my child is a wild hulligan running all over me, that I'm not allowed to discipline them...



  18. #18
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    Oct. 9, 2012
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    Washington State
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    "The children now love luxury; they have bad manners, contempt for authority; they show disrespect for elders and love chatter in place of exercise. Children are now tyrants, not the servants of their households. They no longer rise when elders enter the room. They contradict their parents, chatter before company, gobble up dainties at the table, cross their legs, and tyrannize their teachers." Socrates
    I just read this elsewhere last week. It turns out that some things don't really change, they just go around in cycles. I'm not worried about the future but I think it's pretty normal to think that 'things have never been this bad before' because all you have to compare it to is what's happening right now.



  19. #19
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    Oct. 9, 2000
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    I guess I'm lucky enough to see and know some amazing young adults. I have two different sets of friends who have kids who are just entering college and younger kids still at home in high school. The kids are smart (way smarter than I am!), well-mannered, community-minded, involved in athletics, got scholarships to school, have jobs - one is an Eagle Scout and his brother is on his way to the same accomplishment. These parents have raised wonderful kids and I know there are more out there doing the same.

    I think the biggest factors for both of these families is the absence of a TV in the household - or, strictly limiting the amount of TV that does get watched. The kids have to be creative to find things to do on their own, and they read a LOT.

    So to all you good parents out there I say thank you!!!
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  20. #20
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    Jul. 5, 2007
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    I'm worried... as I'm sure my grand parents were in their day.

    Just think of all the normal, even beneficial, things we take for granted these days that were absolute scandal in generations past. Like women riding astride, voting, burning their bras...

    I mean, what is this world coming to?



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