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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
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    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
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    3,096

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    DH and I both have Sebring convertibles. They have glass back windows. We love them. They are the daily driver. I drive 32 miles each way to work. The top is easy up/easy down. There are more blind spots with the convertible when the top is up. I have to be extra careful in the fall/winter when I am first putting the top up after all summer of no blind spots.

    DH used to have a GTO convertible and I had an MGB convertible. Neither were practical unless the weather was perfect. So we sold both and got the Sebrings instead. Both have over 160,000 miles on them.


    I do take the 4 wheel drive to work on days where the snow might be bad but I did that when I had the Honda Accord. The truck just gives me the option to take really back roads on the way home and avoid traffic. Taking the truck is not a concession to the Sebring being a convertible. The heat works great on this car and I don't feel like keeping the interior warm in the winter is an issue. DH did install a driver seat heater for me since I have leather seats. I sometime forget to turn on the heat since I love the seat heater.


    Not sure about a Saab but if you have a good mechanic in the family the the upgraded AAA why not?
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    18,515

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    My DD had a Miata in high school (only because it was a steal of a deal). She couldn't drive it in the snow, but then school was closed anyway. Otherwise, because it was so cool, she didn't mind freezing in the winter. We did have to replace the top.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,902

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    I'm am currently on Saab #5, though none of them have been convertibles. Two were a PITA, but three have actually been very reliable.

    I love them, but, my current wagon will probably be my last Saab. The company has been on the verge of death for several years now and I'm just not confident that a steady supply of parts will remain available. They've been saying that Saab Parts USA will continue operating, no matter what happens to Saab itself or Saab Cars USA, but I'm tired of worrying about it.

    If you live in New England, you'll have no problem finding a competent, independent Saab mechanic and they won't disappear if the company does. There are lots of older Saabs in junkyards for parts too. If you live somewhere else, service could be a serious concern. Even when Saab was still fairly healthy, however, parts could be a problem, especially big ticket items. I had to wait three months for a rebuilt transmission for a 9000 some years ago, because there was what the service folks called an "intergalactic backorder" on them.

    Now, those older Saab 900 are not hard to work on yourself...they are weird, but once you figure out where everything is, it's not bad. I learned to fix a few things when I was still driving pre-GM Saabs, in self-defense, to keep my costs down .

    Long story short, if DD is in New England and doesn't mind a little stress over part availability, it might be worth a risk if the car is near free. Otherwise, I don't know, especially if no one in her family or immediate support circle has ever owned a Saab before...I've found that having a network to work (mechanics, fellow enthusiasts, etc...) can really make a big difference in reducing frustration.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    2,236

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    I've owned convertibles continuously since the Arab Oil Embargo when I bought my first at a bargain price in a blizzard in Minneapolis -- it was full-sized and to my amusement the dealer lied about engine size since they came with nothing smaller than a 400 cu in V8 -- sometimes as my only vehicle and sometimes along with another car. I owned and drove them year around in Minnesota and Iowa, and in North Carolina. All have had glass windows.

    My father argued that they were both unsafe and impractical, and possibly that was true back in his day. But my two Pontiac convertibles, my Cadillac convertible and my current Mustang GT convertible were all warm in the winter and only when a rubber seal along the roof-line got old did they ever leak in the rain. Also my information is that the center of gravity is a bit lower on post-60's convertibles so they're not quite as prone to roll over as hardtops and sedans.

    The only drawbacks are that the tops can become soiled and can be difficult to keep clean and in NC, free from the ubiquitous black mold that turns up on everything outside, and, of course, the top will age and need replacement every seven or eight years, which is not a cheap update. (I put that off with the Mustang for 3 years or so because of disruptions and the hassle factor -- the only place that does convertible tops nowadays is in another town and it usually takes them two days -- and so got used to not putting it down because I was afraid I'd have trouble getting it back up.) I have never had problems with the hydraulics, but know of others who have.

    The Mustang was engineered to make the airflow minimally disruptive inside the car when the top is down compared to the larger GM convertibles I owned.

    I extend the useful temperature range for having the top down by blasting either the A/C or the heat as needed.

    I've heard mixed things about Saabs, and can't comment on that, but owning a convertible is great.

    Driving down a tree-canopied road at night with the top-down conveys the same sense of wonder that riding in heavily canopied woods near dusk does.

    I'd recommend that anybody old enough to drive sanely consider owning a convertible.

    (Nowadays there's a hefty premium for a convertible version of a car model; although I was too young to drive then, I know that in the 50's and 60's they were priced comparably to the corresponding sedans and hardtops.)
    If I knew what I were doing, why would I take lessons?

    "Things should be as simple as possible,
    but no simpler." - Einstein



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    3,902

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    Oh, there aren't really any special Saab tools, but you do need metric wrenches. We keep a set of both metric and US wrenches and have generally had what we've needed.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2008
    Location
    Where The Snow Flies
    Posts
    2,475

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    Agreed, not many special SAAB tools. Also if it's a 1985-1994 convertible, I wouldn't worry too much about the mileage. What's on the odometer doesn't mean much in the realm of pre-GM SAABs. I had a 1986 SAAB 900 go over 700,000 miles on the original engine and transmission.

    The old, pre-GM SAABs are beasty little tanks that while quirky, I find a whole lot more reliable than many new, computer controlled cars of today. There is quite a cult following for them and websites like SAABnet.com can be a God send in figuring out what fix needs to be had or finding a part. These cars were made to be worked on by a weekend mechanic and aren't complicated. I can do an entire set of brakes - calipers, pads, and rotors by myself in under 2 hours and I'm a girl. Seriously, it's not that hard to figure out.

    I love them, I regret selling my last real, Swedish made SAAB to "upgrade" to a SAAB 9-5 (made by GM and a total piece of plastic crap!) I've been keeping my eyes open for a nice 900 SPG or an Aero to have as my fun car. They are super safe and addictive. I've had 6 SAABs total and will probably have a 7th soon. Oh, and in the Hatch - you can fit 5 bales of hay and 2 bags of grain - ask me how I know.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDeere View Post
    DD has a chance to get an older Saaab convertable. Have you had 1? Would you buy 1 again? We live where it gets hot and snows sometimes in the same week.
    75 billion gazillion times NO!!!!! Hubby has had one for a few years now & it's a true money-pit car. ALWAYS has something going wrong with it, & hubby not only has a foreign auto mechanic background himself, but has had said car serviced by a Saab dealer. Car is still sitting in the driveway, but will be up for sale asap, & hubby said he will never buy another one. They're difficult to service & the costs to do so are prohibitive.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

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    Oh, & I think the MAJOR point that most of you are missing is that the OP isn't asking about whether or not to buy a "convertible", she's SPECIFICALLY asking about purchasing a SAAB CONVERTIBLE.

    There's a HUGE difference.
    Last edited by Bacardi1; Oct. 29, 2012 at 03:26 PM.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2008
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    Where The Snow Flies
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    75 billion gazillion times NO!!!!! Hubby has had one for a few years now & it's a true money-pit car. ALWAYS has something going wrong with it, & hubby not only has a foreign auto mechanic background himself, but has had said car serviced by a Saab dealer. Car is still sitting in the driveway, but will be up for sale asap, & hubby said he will never buy another one. They're difficult to service & the costs to do so are prohibitive.
    Do you mind if I ask what year your husband's SAAB is?



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec. 5, 2004
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    1,236

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    We had one when living in Florida and once the novelty wore off we almost never put the top down. Either too hot or too cold (Ocala) and the wind blowing my hair in my face got old. I also worried about a rollover accident.



  11. #31
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    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowflake View Post
    Do you mind if I ask what year your husband's SAAB is?
    It's a 1996 Saab 900 Convertible.

    Running at the moment, but that can change from moment to moment for no readily apparent reason. Even the dealer mechanics have been stymied.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2008
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    Where The Snow Flies
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bacardi1 View Post
    It's a 1996 Saab 900 Convertible.

    Running at the moment, but that can change from moment to moment for no readily apparent reason. Even the dealer mechanics have been stymied.
    That's why. It's a post-GM take over model. Those thing have INSANE gremlins and rediculous electrical problems because GM had to try to make them a "low-end luxury car" instead of what they were really meant to be as a utilitarian tank.

    Never had a problem with my classic SAABs. Then GM just made them utterly craptastic.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2006
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    At the back of the line
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    GM did a number on Saab. In my day these were the thang. Ugly but bulletproff.

    No GM Saabs no matter how cheap?
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2008
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    Where The Snow Flies
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnDeere View Post
    GM did a number on Saab. In my day these were the thang. Ugly but bulletproff.

    No GM Saabs no matter how cheap?
    Repeat after me:

    NO GM SAABS EVER!!!

    Made in Trollhatten or not at all.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2000
    Location
    NE TN, USA
    Posts
    6,201

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    I have a Mazda Miata and love the rag top, but -- it stays in the garage on inclement days. When the weather's pretty, it's fantastic. When the weather's lousy, it SUCKS!!!

    The old Saabs were great cars. After Government Motors got their grimy hands on them, no *BLEEP*ing way!
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
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    2,966

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    Hubby has a Mazda Miata convertible as well, & loved it until it died recently. But since he does have terrific auto mechanic skills, it's parked in the driveway next to Saab as yet another "project".



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
    Location
    So California
    Posts
    2,935

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    So what's the decision? Ragtop or no?



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2009
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    387

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    '88 Mustang 'Vert, original yellow, converted (haha) to a 2.3 turbo motor stick...it's a blast! I love blowing the doors off of teens (usually boys in trucks) who think an old lady is driving it Does mess my hair up, but who cares when you are waving byebye...



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2006
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    At the back of the line
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    4,016

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    DH swears GM didnt have time to ruin Saab by 1997 so hes pushing hard to get it. Im trying to say its not a good car for snow (like today hello) but he hasnt paid attn in 23 years. Why start now?
    “Management is doing things right; leadership is doing the right things.” Peter Drucker



  20. #40
    Join Date
    Sep. 5, 2011
    Posts
    2,966

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    Personally, I don't like them in any way, shape, or form. Consider them nothing more than death traps.



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