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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov. 4, 2010
    Location
    Houston, TX
    Posts
    252

    Default Striding

    I've heard this quote two different ways...
    "When in doubt, DONT leave it out"

    "When in doubt, leave it out"

    So what would you do... when you're unsure of your distance? Leave one stride out or not?

    Discuss.




  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2008
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    618

    Default

    When in doubt, I prefer to get close as opposed to taking a long one. I also think that the type of fence you're jumping should be taken into account. I REALLY hate seeing a long one to an oxer!! So in my opinion, getting a little close is always the safer option.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 15, 2008
    Location
    Orlando, FL
    Posts
    267

    Default

    Well IMOH getting to close with no support (Chip or Chocolate Chip if it is very bad) you & your horse will probably survive and live to jump other day. On the other hand, if you leave long you and your horse may land in the middle and crash (not pretty if you have ever witnessed it). So if there if a big doubt, I say add the stride (hopefully with rider support so it is not a big chip). Still a big deduction in the hunter ring any higher than Short Stirrup.
    Certified Spiritual Medium/ Animal Communicator
    www.heatherevebristol.com
    www.meliorastables.net



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2007
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    308

    Default

    I think it totally depends on your horse and how comfortable you are with them/know them. On my personal horse I have to leave out or else it turns into a disaster but if I'm on an unknown horse I will add (even if I prefer to leave out) just to be on the safe side. I think that should be a rule of thumb unless you really know what you're doing (aka a pro)! I've seen some people ride my mare during swap rides and she leaves long and they have no idea what to do and she gets slammed down on/yanked in the mouth. Even if they know she does it!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2012
    Posts
    402

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KateD View Post
    I think it totally depends on your horse and how comfortable you are with them/know them.
    This right here. On my mare, her chips make me feel like we're going to die, and they're not graceful in the slightest-it's a good gasping chip. Then again, we don't do gigantic solid jumps either, which makes a bit of a difference.

    Most other horses, especially ones that I don't know well, I'd much rather go for a chip.
    I like mares. They remind me of myself: stubborn know it alls who only acknowledge you if you have food.
    Hannah B. Nana: 50% horse, 50% hippo
    Fiona: can't decide between jumpers or napping



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2006
    Location
    Seattle, WA
    Posts
    5,503

    Default

    There is no "correct" answer to this question.

    It depends on the horse (scopey or not, big stride or little stride, etc.).

    It depends on the distance. A little long is always better than a lot short and a little short is always better than a lot long.

    It depends on the jump. Short to a triple bar is far better than long. Short to a big square oxer might be more difficult for the horse than long. And so on. Though this all still depends on the horse. It also depends on what's in front of you on course. Galloping for a long spot into a super short combination is not going to be a life-affirming moment.

    I think the real choice comes down to "when in doubt....." either "compress your horse's step to make them bouncier and collected" or "gallop forward and establish a good strong rhythm." And I think that's unrelated to the actual jump. If you're relying on finding the distance for the horse and you're routinely missing (i.e. causing a chip or a dive) you'll eventually create a stopper. If you're unsure about distances and let the horse sort it out (by only focusing on quality of canter) you'll have an equal partner who doesn't blame you for the bad jumps.
    __________________________________
    Forever exiled in the NW.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 7, 2001
    Location
    Usually too far from the barn
    Posts
    8,918

    Default

    Generally, if you have to run like a bat outta he!! to get there, there is a better option. Clearly there are exceptions, like the final line in the Priesident's cup or running for gold in the olympics but most of the time, the run and launch is going to leave you in far less control on the other side of the jump. That is where you find trouble.
    Far too many riders (including me for many years) were fearful that the "short spot" was a "mistake" and always want to jump the gap. It isn't an easy lesson but it's worth learning to ride to the base. Riding to the base is not "a chip" but a planned collection to get the add.
    F O.B
    Resident racing historian ~~~ Re-riders Clique
    Founder of the Mighty Thoroughbred Clique



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    678

    Default

    My trainer always said "When in doubt, wait it out" which I guess is the same as when is doubt, don't leave it out, but wait it out helps me remember to stay quiet and consistent and not to start pulling or really moving up.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2008
    Location
    Long Island
    Posts
    959

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ponyjumper525 View Post
    I've heard this quote two different ways...
    "When in doubt, DONT leave it out"

    "When in doubt, leave it out"

    So what would you do... when you're unsure of your distance? Leave one stride out or not?

    Discuss.

    What I tend to do:
    Pick until there's nothing (doesn't come out pretty)

    What Works for Me/My horse:
    Press up to it! My horse has a monster stride and loves to leave long (within reason)

    It depends a lot on how much DOUBT there is, but in general I tend to doubt even normal gappy distances on my guy, so the answer is almost always LEAVE IT OUT.

    Unless we're in the middle of a line, in which case the correct answer is usually "sit back and fit it in!" because otherwise we're leaving strides out....



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2006
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,072

    Default

    As far as showing if you are having a tough time finding your distances I think a judge would prefer you come in quiet and add in the line rather than run down the line and leave out. It makes a prettier picture. For example, this past weekend I showed and in my division one of riders decided to add as her horse was very quiet. As she was passing by the ingate she said to her trainer "He's quiet, I'm going to add!" She made a conscious decision and rode quiet in's to all of her lines and she managed all of the distances the same way. In this case, I would absolutely say add!

    Conversely, I would hate to see someone chip rather than move up to take a longer distance. I think the important thing is that the rider makes a decision and manages the pace consistantly throughout the ride.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2009
    Posts
    5,002

    Default

    For my particular horse, its better to sit and wait. When I see a long spot it almost always gets us into trouble. However, I have to add that thats because at the long spot *I* tend to eff things up (lean forward, take my leg off, chuck the reins at her head). Its mainly because I don't trust the move up ride. So we've been working a lot on me just sitting quietly and pressing up to the fence, and when I'm not sure where I am, to make sure I am NOT leaning forward.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2005
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,452

    Default

    I was always taught "when in doubt, wait it out"... Meaning... Don't decide yet... Pass that distance up and take the next that comes along.
    "If you are nervous you arent focused-if you are focused, there is no room for nerves!"




  13. #13
    Join Date
    Feb. 21, 2011
    Posts
    355

    Default

    If you don't see anything, maintain a consistent canter and the let your horse find a safe spot. Many riders (I have definitely been guilty of this!!) tend to pick away at the horse's canter trying to bide time in order to see a distance. This rarely ends well However, it is equally bad to gun your horse into something you don't see. If you have to make that major of a change in your pace, there was another option there. In summation, "when in doubt, WAIT IT OUT" by maintaining a consistent pace and not making a big move.



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