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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 27, 2002
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    5,192

    Default ocean front homes--should they be allowed to rebuild or not?

    i'm not even sure how i feel about this, though normally i'm all about the rights of landowners.

    but seeing the footage of the jersey shore makes me wonder.
    what do you think?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    Default

    I don't care if they build them. I just don't want my tax dollars paying emergency or disaster funds to replace the ones that were knowingly built in a high-risk, often-damaged area.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    I used to live on a river that flooded pretty often and that was a question posed pretty often. The river was surrounded by older vacation homes that had grown into a commuter suburb/resort town for SF CA and the towns in between.

    I can't say either.
    The local paper did a story about it where there were houses that had been insured and repaired so often that the payout(s) added to more than the value of the house, and they did another about the grant money for home raising, where the houses that got raised by adding stories were more often than not entered into the program by a flipper owner or contractor owner that would raise and update the house with free money and then take the profit and do it again, while actual owner occupants couldn't always muster up the finances to start the project and still lived in substandard flood prone buildings.

    We build a lot of things where we shouldn't, that's for sure.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 30, 2006
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    634

    Default

    There are houses on the shore that have been there for more years than many other houses. The coast of NC has some oldies and even with the erosion of the sand dunes they are doing fine riding out hurricanes year after year.

    I have lived a few hundred miles from the coast and had hurricane do damage to my house. Trees and wind shear/tornado.

    If it's not a hurricane, then it is likely to be something else. No houses in N Alabama or the midwest for tornados? No houses along the big swath of the Mississippi. What about not building on earthquake zones? That cuts out a chunk of California.

    The idea should be to promote more responsible building. Maybe not building on low lying land or flood planes-- but even than only occurs every 100 yrs or so. And to support new construction with good building codes.

    I talked today with a woman at work who was anxious about her family home on Rockaway Beach. It was her grandmother's, her mother's and now her house. It's in the same neighborhood that lost 80 houses to a fire. (Living near or far away from the coast does not matter when there is a fire during the middle of a natural disaster by the way.) She had been hoping that her home would ride out the storm fine because it was build off the ground and wouldn't take on so much water. I know that in Florida many homes were built on stilts after Donna from lessons learned about water and devastation. I suppose for her, it's not so much about the house itself as the memories.

    Natural disasters can occur most places, but it's about being prepared.


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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2007
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    Hollowed out volcano in the South Pacific.
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    Default

    No. The sad part is that taxpayers actually foot the bill for reconstruction. Yeah, that's right. Your tax dollars go to rebuild someone else's beach house. It's on the books and there is funding for it.
    Thus do we growl that our big toes have, at this moment, been thrown up from below!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Packing my bags
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    Default

    I am a beach house fan.
    I don't own one, but I like to rent one now and then when I can get away.

    It's not like the owners get a free ride. I am sure the insurance is through the roof!

    Supporting the coastal area benefits the inland, I am thinking, because without the care for the beaches (and the houses by extension) the coast would eventually creep up.
    We have a friend who really hates the attention paid to the small barrier island near his home...but the importance is right there, in the name.

    Beaches have a great impact on the local economy which probably outlasts any public spending to restore the infrastructure. (most beach houses are rentals, that means revenue and taxes)
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
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    Where humidity isn't just a word, it's a way of life.
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LexInVA View Post
    No. The sad part is that taxpayers actually foot the bill for reconstruction. Yeah, that's right. Your tax dollars go to rebuild someone else's beach house. It's on the books and there is funding for it.
    I know "low interest" loans are available in disaster areas (which includes wildfire, tornado, earthquake, etc. areas) ( they pay interest, just a bit lower than the standard rate) are available, but have never heard of the government actually just paying to rebuild for people; I'm sure quite a few of those in MS and LA would love to hear about that since they couldn't afford to rebuild after Katrina.

    I have no issue as long as they are required to pay insurance or sign a contract stating they will not use those free federal funds to rebuild.



  8. #8
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    Default

    I don't remember the precise details but the government DID buy out a group of people whose homes had been slid over/were threatened by a large slide.

    Rio Nido CA.

    I am thinking that the buyout was done as an eminent domain condemnation in order that a retention basin could be put in to keep the debris from the slide from traveling further. I do remember that it was a much-discussed case, as most homeowner's insurance will not cover damage from landslides/mudslides so most of the folks were left with nothing but their mortgages .
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 23, 2005
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    Spotsylvania, VA
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    Default

    In some disaster prone areas some insurance companies won't write homeowner's policies, insurance comes from a state high risk pool. It's expensive. Some home owners self insure. BTW unless you use your beach house as a rental, losses are personal and not tax deductable.

    Most though certainly not all federal money is spent on infrastructure and low interest loans.
    I wasn't always a Smurf
    Penmerryl's Sophie RIDSH
    "I ain't as good as I once was but I'm as good once as I ever was"
    The ignore list is my friend. It takes 2 to argue.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2000
    Location
    NE TN, USA
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    Default

    Let them rebuild, but don't force we taxpayers to subsidize them through low interest loans, tax incentives, or flood insurance. Let the free market do its job. The same goes for all high risk areas. If you can't afford the insurance, you can't afford the house.
    “There are two ways to conquer and enslave a nation. One is by the sword. The other is by debt.”
    John Adams


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
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    Where humidity isn't just a word, it's a way of life.
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Frank B View Post
    Let them rebuild, but don't force we taxpayers to subsidize them through low interest loans, tax incentives, or flood insurance. Let the free market do its job. The same goes for all high risk areas. If you can't afford the insurance, you can't afford the house.
    The only issue I see with that is who designates the high risk areas?

    Some are obvious; right on a beach, New Orleans, etc., but what about CA and the earthquakes, the midwest towns that have had tornadoes multiple times, along rivers that never escape their banks except that one time, the 100 year flood plains (I lived in one in CO that required flood insurance, and Noah would have been building an ark before that place could flood, but it was in the designated area), mountains where wildfires could occur, much of the east coast that has now had two very bad storms, etc.

    All of MS is no longer covered by some insurance companies due to hurricane risk, even the uppermost part that is hundreds of miles from the coast. Most areas have some type of risk; do we trust the insurance companies or government to decide what is a high area of risk?



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