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  1. #1
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    Default FEI Microchip requirement

    There is a press release that all new FEI registrants will have to be microchipped as of January 1, 2013. Questions are to be directed to Ken Ball at the USEF.

    It looks to me as if the USEF has completely dropped the ball on this. It's going to be one heck of a mess. The story mentions getting the chips through "your private vet".

    The JCs worldwide have had microchip access, even in the US which is so resistant to change. The registry issues the numbers and (I believe) the chips. It isn't up to the applicant and the vet to come up with the "right" numbers.

    There is some useful information on what types of chips are compliant with the FEI rule. But there is no information on how to get the information that goes into the chip. Who issues the number that goes into the chip if the horse isn't in a registry? If the number is expected to be lifetime for the FEI, what about horses that don't have lifetime USEF registrations?

    Is it an FEI number? All the chip information is also supposed to be in the FEI passport. So if it's the FEI registration number, it almost looks like a data loop.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
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  2. #2
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    Default

    I hadn't looked into it quite as far as you have, viney, but I figured this would be another Euro-centred FEI cluster-you-know-what.

    I do see a value to keeping track of horses, knowing breeding etc. But thus far, the FEI hasn't exactly been a paragon of accurate record-keeping.
    Blugal

    You never know what kind of obsessive compulsive crazy person you are until another person imitates your behaviour at a three-day. --Gry2Yng



  3. #3
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    Default

    Actually this isn't new. I knew it was coming last year. Kevin Keen and others have had up dates to their clients about it for over a year.

    You only have to get it when you apply for an FEI passport but would love it we started it sooner.

    Most of the vets around here are up to date on what you need to do for the process and I'm told it is not a big deal....but it will be more complicated for those out in the boonies.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **



  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    There is a press release that all new FEI registrants will have to be microchipped as of January 1, 2013. Questions are to be directed to Ken Ball at the USEF.

    .
    Then why don't you simply email Ken?

    This only impacts a very small number of competitors. No sense in getting stressed over it. Or do you have an FEI horse that we don't know about? LMAO



  5. #5
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    Default

    I like the idea of a microchip so much more than silly passports, Coggins papers, and 30-day health certificates. If the intent is tight regulation of travel, vaccination, and ensuring compliance with required testing, a chip is the way to go. And of course it's hard to pass a horse off as another horse if the horses are all chipped, although I doubt that's much of a concern.

    What is needed, of course, is a system that allows storage of data somehow--when a vet gives a horse its shots, it scans that into a database, and anyone anywhere who accesses that database can see that the horse was vaccinated. This is do-able without chips, but some sort of electronic means of identifying which horse is vaccinated "on the spot" is a good idea.

    I'm not opposed to new innovations simply because they're complicated. But they ought to do some GOOD, and making sure horses are properly vaccinated and not likely to spread disease is a good use of technology.
    Click here before you buy.



  6. #6
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    Default

    It's going to apply to a lot more event horses than jumpers or dressage horses. There are far more event riders without world class FEI aspirations for their 1 and 2* horses than there are FEI level jumpers and dressage horses in North America.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
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  7. #7
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    Default

    Our vets have been on top of it for months. I'd suggest you give your vet a call. You don't need to get info to put into the chip- the chip has a number. You put the chip in the horse, then note that number on the horse's FEI passport application.

    From dressage news: "The microchips must be compatible with ISO 11784 and ISO 11785 and all microchip information must be entered in the horse passport and reported to the national federation. It applies to initial FEI registration only. The standard microchip number consists of 15 digits–the first three identify the manufacturer or country code and the remaining numbers are unique. The chips provide radio frequency identification of the specific horse for the life of the animal from date of implant."



  8. #8
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    Apr. 11, 2006
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    Default

    Viney I am in the middle of this so maybe I can be of help. The chip is only needed for horses that need a passport in 2013. You have to use chips compatible with:

    ISO 11784
    ISO 11785

    The first set of flu vaccines need to be recorded on the chip as well as all future shots. Some more info:

    134.2 KHC microchip, Bayer ResQ Home Again/Digital Angel

    Locally its about $80 for the chip placement plus the cost of the vaccines, paperwork, etc.



  9. #9
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    Default

    Sigh. I see it as yet another FEI hoop to jump through.

    Yes, I can see how it could be "a good thing"-- tracking horses and vaccinations in case of disease is helpful. But there are so many other Good Things the FEI could do, rather than create more bureaucratic mess.

    My UL horse (now broodmare) has had a passport since 2006, so I think she's exempt (if I ever decide to do an FEI competition with her again). My 4 y/o is a ways off from FEI registration; I'm sure my very experienced, licensed FEI, regular vet can walk me through the chipping process. But it's just one more expense (and frankly unnecessary procedure) just to get to a three-day event.

    Knowing that all FEI horses are microchipped will not really make me feel any safer regarding my horse's chance of catching disease.
    “A clever person solves a problem. A wise person avoids it.”
    ? Albert Einstein

    ~AJ~



  10. #10
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    Default

    Does that mean that the chip number is NOT the UELN? That it's a random 15 digit number that is pulled from some hat somewhere, perhaps by the chip manufacturer? Where and how are data recorded "on the chip"?
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
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  11. #11
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    Default

    If it's anything like dogs, there is no data on the chip. The chip is a number, from the chip manufacturer. The chip number is registered with the chip manufacturer (and here, presumably the FEI) as belonging to the horse in question. Ownership etc is updated with whomever has registered the chip.

    The chip is only a permanent way of attaching a number to the critter, to be tied to whatever info is sent to the registration organization.



  12. #12
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    Oct. 14, 2012
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    Default

    The numbers are compliant with an international system of numbering, a poster above linked to an article that refers to it.

    No information but a number is actually stored within the chip. All of the horses info will be linked to that number in the a database. The chip simply functions as permanent ID, like a brand or tattoo but much easier to read.



  13. #13
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    Oct. 4, 2008
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    Sigh, why cant we just have an oober cool brand to put on the hip?? Then my grade horse will fit right in with really uber cool warmbloods who routinely beat us with their really uber cool movement!! LOL. I have three to chip, yipee.
    May the sun shine on you daily, and your worries be gone with the wind.
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  14. #14
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    I chipped my own for 9.00 with an ebay bought chip when I got her- not that she is at a level to need it for competition, but I wanted easy permanent id for her. I chipped my puppies when I was breeding pugs-cheapest easiest way to comply with AKC id regs.



  15. #15
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    Default

    I am in a breed registry that requires microchipping for our voluntary evaluation system. I've been chipping for years as a result.

    I'm not familiar with the FEI rules on chipping. My registry requires that a vet do it and record the chip number on a form that is then sent in. The vet scans the chip first to make sure the number on the chip matches the number on the preloaded syringe. After insertion, the chip is rescanned again.

    Most small animal vets have the chips and scanners. Most large animal vets don't have scanners unless they do lots of chipping. The scanners are about $300 each. My vet has my scanner on long term loan as I don't have a foreseeable need for it at the moment.

    If a breed registry is selling chips, they are just buying them from the manufacturer and reselling likely at a mark-up. You can buy directly from the manufacturer. I do from Avid/Home Again. I get the preloaded syringes.

    I actually like chipping because it allows you to positively identify your horse if necessary. And while Norwegian Fjords definitely do look alike, so do lots of plain bay warmbloods.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
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  16. #16
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    Default

    If the number is expected to be lifetime for the FEI, what about horses that don't have lifetime USEF registrations?
    Not an issue since the horse has to have a USEF Lifetime Recording before you can apply for an FEI passport..
    Janet

    chief feeder and mucker for Music, Spy, Belle and Tiara. Someone else is now feeding and mucking for Chief and Brain (both foxhunting now).



  17. #17
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    Does that mean that the chip number is NOT the UELN? That it's a random 15 digit number that is pulled from some hat somewhere, perhaps by the chip manufacturer? Where and how are data recorded "on the chip"?
    Yes, that's what it means. The chip number is longer and contains different information than the UELN. The UELN is derived from country and registry information. Many breeds have been using chips for a long time. The US is (as usual) very behind on this.

    About half my horses have chips from their registries, but all of my dogs have chips from the vet and Homeagain. It's not hard or expensive. It makes a lot of sense to do. I wish chips were more prevalent in horses. It is a tool that could help solve a lot of problems.

    BTW - brands are now giving way to chips in many registries.

    SCFarm
    The above post is an opinion, just an opinion. If it were a real live fact it would include supporting links to websites full of people who already agreed with me.

    www.southern-cross-farm.com



  18. #18
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    That means that the actual horse information is stored in a hackable database somewhere that is subject to editing.

    I had hoped that the chip be programmed somehow with the horse information before it was implanted. That way it would not subject to computer glitches and editing.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    That means that the actual horse information is stored in a hackable database somewhere that is subject to editing.

    I had hoped that the chip be programmed somehow with the horse information before it was implanted. That way it would not subject to computer glitches and editing.
    What information do you think is "hackable"? The microchip number is stored in several databases, depending on where the chip is procured from. For example: in my registries the registry itself buys blocks of chips from the chip manufacturer. So the manufacturer knows who has those range of chip numbers.

    The registry distributes the chips to the horse owners as part of the registration process and the registry records the chip umber along with the demographic information of the horse (pedigree, birth date, owner, breeder, markings, sex, and, if appropriate, inspection results. The chip number often accompanies the DNA samples to the testing labs and is recorded there as well.

    In the mean time the chip number is used by other agencies - such as vets, performance organizations, and even (OMG) government agencies (for use in disease control, production reports, export records, etc.) - this is common in Europe.

    So, if you are worried about proving that "this horse is this particular horse" there are multiple databases that would need to be hacked in order to make them all match. If you are worried about drugs and medications issues, then you are (and always have been) dependent on the honestly of attending vets on what medications they have given.

    What it does do is allow for an excellent check on drug testing protocols. As in: blood and urine were collected on this date and time from a horse with this chip number (which was scanned when the samples were taken). In this instance it is a pretty darn good way to ensure accuracy in verifying the horse the sample belongs to.

    As far as health certificates and such: You would have a paper or tamper-proof electronic copy (which is easy to do these days) that have the health records of the horse with the specific chip number on it. When the horse is checked against the record, the chip scan must match the paperwork. This is much more accurate than a drawing or picture on a Coggins Certificate.

    SCFarm
    The above post is an opinion, just an opinion. If it were a real live fact it would include supporting links to websites full of people who already agreed with me.

    www.southern-cross-farm.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
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    WHEW! I am having trouble understanding the negative posts here (especially the ones who are whining when they have not even done any research and so do not know what they are whining about).

    I think it is a wonderful idea and can only see the benefits of it. How many of you have had your dogs microchipped? Back in the 1970's (before micro chipping was available) I had my dogs tattoo'd on their inner ear flaps. I did not want to risk having my dog stolen and sold into research labs or resold on the street. I wanted to PROTECT my dogs. And, since then all my dogs have been microchipped; if they get lost I want them to be able to come home again.

    So, what is the problem with doing the same thing for horses? The only people who I can see who would be against it are people who intend to cheat and pass a horse off as a different horse. But I do not think we should pander to that group.

    Seriously, please tell what your VALID reasons are (meaning, not reasons that do not exist, and you would know it if you had done some homework/read for comprehension).
    "I used to have money, now I have horses."



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