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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,911

    Default Repairing a blanket

    I just got an awesome deal on a Rambo blanket, but it has a tear in the shoulder that is fairly large... it also needs washed. I don't have time to drop it off to be repaired and laundered before I need it.

    Can I duct tape it or will that let it get ruined when I wash it? If not, what is the best way for me to repair it at home?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,116

    Default

    What sort of tear? Is it a slice through the material, or is there a chunk missing?

    My horse tends to put tears in her turn out – no material missing, just torn along the weave. I hand stitch the hole closed (think like stitches on a person!), and then I go over the sewn part with “liquid stitch” or some other type of fabric glue to seal the area.

    Steps for me (I just finished all of my blanket repair!):
    Stitch any holes closed
    Launder with mild detergent
    Hang to THOUGHLY dry
    Go over repairs with liquid stitch, let dry
    Re-water proof with 3M outdoor fabric waterproofing.

    I would NOT duct tape and then wash.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2008
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    2,195

    Default

    Don't use duct tape!!!!! When you go to remove it it will leave gunk on the blanket that will mess up the sewing machine.

    Rambo does sell a blanket repair tape-I've never used it so I'm not sure how well it works.

    Is the rip on the outside or inside?

    If it is on the inside, I stitch it together myself.

    If it's on the outside, I would go ahead and wash the blanket and then use the Rambo repair tape. I would think that would allow you to use it until it can be fully repaired.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,911

    Default

    It looks like a tear in the fabric, it is being shipped as we speak. That sounds like it will work, I was so worried about getting the insulation wet!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,911

    Default

    Mk, on the outside.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,116

    Default

    I would get busy with a needle and thread. Its easy, cheap and fairly quick - and it is a permanent fix.

    The insulation can get wet, but I would worry that it would start coming out the hole during laundering.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2000
    Location
    El Paso, TX
    Posts
    12,538

    Default

    I've used the iron on patches with some success.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2010
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    543

    Default

    My mom always stitched blankets with floss and then put a waterproof patch over. The floss, I guess, is much stronger then normal thread.

    I send all of mine out because I'm totally useless when it comes to any sort of sewing.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 31, 2012
    Location
    Coastal NC
    Posts
    963

    Default

    I use dental floss for stitching also. I cannot sew at all but have successfully managed to repair my blankets without any problem. The repair jobs do not look so great but have held up just fine.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2005
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    286

    Default

    Use a good weight polyester thread. Dental floss is normally made of nylon. Nylon is good for indoor applications but nylon thread will break down in sunlight. Polyester thread is what you want to use for blanket (halter, bell boot, etc) repair as is it durable, string and will hold up to the uv rays.

    Much cheaper and stronger than dental floss. One of my favorites is the Coates and Clark heavyweight thread. Comes in a few colors, and is strong and easy to work with.

    Be careful stitching lining, if you leave too heavy of stitches and too much material is ripped you run the risk of creating seams that may rub the horse and also altering the fit of the blanket, a rip with jagged edges that you can't darn is best fixed with a patch so you don't pull the material closed and alter the size. Same with an external tear however you really don't have to worry about the seam and rubbing.

    Good luck, I have had great luck with blankets that seem a total loss. And if it is a total loss, cut the hardware out to save for later repairs and turn the blanket into a great waterproof quarter sheet by cutting off the shoulders and sewing a binding on. Recycle



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