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  1. #21
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    Feb. 16, 2010
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    Jacksonville, FL
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    How much did you pay for him? If it's not much maybe just give the horse back, don't worry about a refund. If the original owners won't take him back try to give him away.

    I'm sorry but everything you've described about this horse makes me think it's a horrible fit. Your Confidence issues and riding plans + Horse's hip injury/soundness issues, lack of training, rodeo bucking = a bad idea and waste of money.

    Consider this an expensive lesson.

    I know you say you can park this horse at your parent's house but what's the point of that? He's not going to make a nice light riding horse without training.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
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    Jul. 30, 2008
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    Sioux Falls, SD
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    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    If you can't place a saddle on him & have your trainer repeat the actions in the video, then it's misrepresentation.
    Just because they can't put a saddle on and repeat what the horse has shown in video doesn't mean it's misrepresentation. Bucking with the new to him saddle could be many things - testing his limits, bad saddle fit, green horse attitude, cinched up too quickly/too tightly, never had a back cinch on, who knows. I'd say misrepresentation if the OP hadn't seen it done and there wasn't video of the horse saddled and being ridden, and was just taking someone's word. But there are lots of reasons a horse could buck.

    To OP: I run a rescue, so this is what stood out with me. Does the rescue/trainer still have the original mare you liked? I would consider approaching the rescue about a trade, if you can. I know our rescue would consider it, because we do focus on training and rehabilitating horses that need it, and we'd rather see a good horse/rider match than a bad one. If they could take in this green horse and provide the training, etc; while you take the OTTB mare that you liked, it seems like a win/win. But I don't know if other people/rescues would do something like that - it's just an idea.
    If you don't like something, change it. If you can't change it, change your attitude.
    ~ Maya Angelou


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jul. 5, 2007
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    Beside Myself ~ Western NY
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    7,203

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    Quote Originally Posted by nikelodeon79 View Post
    I knew he had limited under saddle time: just walking and a trot or two on the lunge line.
    Quote Originally Posted by nikelodeon79 View Post
    Tonight we had our first training session. He bucked like a rodeo horse when we put the saddle on.
    Quote Originally Posted by nikelodeon79 View Post
    so I'll plan on bringing him to my parents' farm for light riding.
    Quote Originally Posted by nikelodeon79 View Post
    I've been struggling with some confidence issues lately.
    Ummm... OK

    Quote Originally Posted by nikelodeon79 View Post
    I'm not entirely sure what point you're trying to make... snipping portions of my posts and quoting them? A more instructive post would be appreciated. I realize it's often fun to "bash"/make fun of people on COTH, but please at least use a few paragraphs to do so. I haven't made it terribly difficult to do... I've already admitted that I screwed up and made a poor decision..
    I didn't think I needed to spell it out anymore than you did. You've admitted you've made a poor decision and you are trying to remedy it with another one. (taking him home to ride now and then when what this horse may<probably> need is years of wet saddle pads to be safe/enjoyable for a weekend ride by someone with admited confidence issues)

    Showhorsegallery sums it up below

    Quote Originally Posted by showhorsegallery View Post
    I'm sorry but everything you've described about this horse makes me think it's a horrible fit. Your Confidence issues and riding plans + Horse's hip injury/soundness issues, lack of training, rodeo bucking = a bad idea and waste of money.

    Consider this an expensive lesson.
    Why is it that a woman will forgive homicidal behavior in a horse, yet be highly critical of a man for leaving the toilet seat up?
    ~ Dave Barry


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2012
    Location
    South Range, WI
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    267

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    Quote Originally Posted by SaturdayNightLive View Post
    I'm confused - when you went to look at the horse, did you not have them tack it up and sit on it? If not, why not? And why didn't you take your trainer with you to evaluate him?
    The horse was being stabled at a rescue, and apparently her insurance policy didn't allow anyone to ride him other than her (the BO, not the owner). The horse had been in training under someone else not associated with the rescue, but hadn't been worked in about two months at the time I looked at him.

    It was a 3 hour trip to go see him, and my trainer is very busy. She did offer to go look at horses I was interested in but I was stupid and impulsive and went ahead and agreed to a purchase before she had time to go down and look at him with me.

    It was also just a weird situation. I've never purchased a horse and the seller had never sold one. Neither one of us had any clue what we were doing. My trainer had told me to ask about a 30-60 day trial period and the owner was ready to agree, but then the rescue/barn owner overheard and told her NOT to do it.

    I'm also confused by what you say you worked on this first training session. "Getting the head in the proper position"? 20 page rants about headset aside, why was this what concerned you during this training session? From your posts, this horse has never even cantered undersaddle. You have bigger problems than where he wants to put his head.
    I think I really, really used the wrong wording. She was looking for "softening"/relaxation and not necessarily head position. While round-penning him, she was waiting for him to relax before she asked for a halt. It was mostly about him getting comfortable carrying the saddle.

    We've all made bad choices in horses. In my experience, it's usually best to sell the horse and get one more suitable. You want to be able to enjoy this process of bringing along a project, not be terrified because you're hopelessly overhorsed.
    I haven't ruled out trying to find a new home for him, but definitely have to see what the vet has to say about soundness, etc. I think it's going to be difficult for me to find a place for him at this point in the year and at his level of training, particularly if he's not sound.

    Quote Originally Posted by showhorsegallery View Post
    How much did you pay for him? If it's not much maybe just give the horse back, don't worry about a refund. If the original owners won't take him back try to give him away.
    I only paid $600, plus $160 to trailer him to me. I don't have a trailer so if I send him back to the owner (not even sure if she would take him back), I would have to pay for transport again.


    Quote Originally Posted by Tif_Ann View Post
    To OP: I run a rescue, so this is what stood out with me. Does the rescue/trainer still have the original mare you liked?
    The mare is still at the barn but I believe one of the trainer's other students is interested in her and might have adopted her.

    I would consider approaching the rescue about a trade, if you can.
    It would be great... but both rescues (the one with the mare and the one with the gelding) deal ONLY with off the track horses.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2010
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    Jacksonville, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by nikelodeon79 View Post

    I only paid $600, plus $160 to trailer him to me. I don't have a trailer so if I send him back to the owner (not even sure if she would take him back), I would have to pay for transport again.
    Seriously, call the owner up and tell them you want to return the horse and they can keep the money. You need to look at this as, "It's only $160 to get this loser off the books." That's not even a vet visit.

    Buy your way out of this deal. Next time try a horse before buying it.

    Yeah it sucks to lose $920. But it's worse to lose months of wasted time, effort and board money more.

    Don't throw good money after bad.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec. 7, 2006
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    183

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    I was going to suggest trading this gelding for the OTTB mare that was suitable for you - sounds like this isn't an option.

    Sounds like you are pretty set on working with this horse - assuming the vet clears him as sound/recovered from his hip injury - after your trainer works with him for a month or two - ask her to be honest with you about how long it will be before he is safe for you to ride - and then only you can decide if its worth it to invest your money any further, or if its better to accept that you bought a new pet for your parents farm.

    I worry that this horse will discourage you at a time when you are excited to start learning a new discipline. Good luck with your decision.

    OR

    What showhorsegallery suggests is even better, I think!
    Last edited by ace**; Oct. 17, 2012 at 11:44 AM. Reason: Agree with showhorsegallery



  7. #27
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    4,612

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    Oh boy.

    So, this is an unbroke 6-7 year old that has a known hip injury and who rodeo bucked the first time you saddled him?

    I'm going to be blunt. I think this was a really bad purchase. If you have space at your parents house where you can just retire him, that is what I would do. I would NOT dump more money into him to get him trained. If you feel like pulling him out of the field later on down the road to see if you can get him broke, then fine. But I would not board him at an expensive place and put a lot of trainer time into him.

    Then go buy an OTTB, possibly one of the two you were already eyeing up. OTTBs are at least broke, and your trainer (and probably you) can start working with them right away.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 16, 2010
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    Jacksonville, FL
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    This is going to be so mean so I'm sorry in advance, I don't mean to pick on you because obviously you know you made a bad purchase otherwise you wouldn't have started this thread but I find myself wondering what the seller was thinking. They must have been thrilled you agreed to buy him.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2011
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    Madison, GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by showhorsegallery View Post
    This is going to be so mean so I'm sorry in advance, I don't mean to pick on you because obviously you know you made a bad purchase otherwise you wouldn't have started this thread but I find myself wondering what the seller was thinking. They must have been thrilled you agreed to buy him.
    I'm with showhorsegallery... The seller was probably elated to send off a possibly permanently lame, unbroke, gelding and actually get money in return...

    OP I know this has to be so difficult for you but if you can only afford one horse, I would make sure it is a horse you can enjoy riding. Losing $920 sucks, but it could be so much more so I would try to just give him back and find a new horse that is at least sound so you don't have to worry about doing a lot of training for nothing.

    I just dumped thousands of dollars into training and showing for my WB gelding in hopes of getting him sold... Well no one bought him, I'm out enough money to buy a used car, and I have a WB that's showed 3' at 'A' shows and all I want to do is show APHA with DH... BIG lesson learned there!
    Southern Cross Guest Ranch
    An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia
    www.southcross.com
    RIP Bocephus March 2008 - April 2013


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
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    Rixeyville, VA
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    I agree with showhorsegallery. I would return the horse if at all possible and not request a refund. You are better off losing the purchase price and trailering costs versus the far more significant amounts you are going to spend on boarding, upkeep, training, vet and other services.

    Buying based on emotion is not uncommon and happens often enough with first horses. But if you are going to get enjoyment from horses and develop as a rider, you need to start with a different horse. Please cut your losses now. I don't care what you trainer says about potential. She is going to get paid regardless as to whether you can sell him or not. And it might be years before that can happen. The best plan is to return the horse if the seller will take him back.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com


    5 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Baltimore, MD
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    Wait. You bought him from a rescue? Any rescue worthy of the title will take a horse back when it isn't a good fit for the sake of the horse's safety. He could easily end up in the slaughter pipeline otherwise. Give him back, with or without a refund.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul. 26, 2001
    Location
    Toronto, Canada.
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    OK Im going to be on your side for this one. IF you have the patience to wait it out, he might be worth it. IF he is sound/comfortable

    Some of the best combinations I know had not started out that way. Its amazing how much your learn from starting with groundwork, developing a relationship and then starting under saddle.

    I had one that was WAY too much horse for me, I would fall off at least weekly. The mare was athletic, could buck, but wasnt trying to kill me. I had to learn to ride her, and she had to learn to get broke again (had been off 6 years having babies) and tolerate a novice headstong junior.

    I hated her for the first year. I wanted to do what everyone else was doing, jump lessons, showing, heck...even just riding! Three years later, she was a junior jumper and medal champion. She would do anything for me, including hack in a cow field bareback with leadropes/halter. HUGE learning curve for me with a ton of frusterations, but what a learning experinece. Because of her, my next horse that I raised from a baby/backed etc.was an FEI junior jumper finalist by age 8, and he had never had a professional ride...ever. I thank my mare for that.

    However, saying all that - if he is not what you want, there is nothing wrong with saying so. If you still see potential in him, and you think he is still "the one", I say stick it out. But, there is nothing worse than having a horse that you have no future with. Now, for myself, being not even close to a junior anymore - my needs have changed. While I still like a challenge, I need safety horse in my life



  13. #33
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    Oct. 16, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by SquishTheBunny View Post
    OK Im going to be on your side for this one. IF you have the patience to wait it out, he might be worth it. IF he is sound/comfortable

    Some of the best combinations I know had not started out that way. Its amazing how much your learn from starting with groundwork, developing a relationship and then starting under saddle.

    I had one that was WAY too much horse for me, I would fall off at least weekly. The mare was athletic, could buck, but wasnt trying to kill me. I had to learn to ride her, and she had to learn to get broke again (had been off 6 years having babies) and tolerate a novice headstong junior.

    I hated her for the first year. I wanted to do what everyone else was doing, jump lessons, showing, heck...even just riding! Three years later, she was a junior jumper and medal champion. She would do anything for me, including hack in a cow field bareback with leadropes/halter. HUGE learning curve for me with a ton of frusterations, but what a learning experinece. Because of her, my next horse that I raised from a baby/backed etc.was an FEI junior jumper finalist by age 8, and he had never had a professional ride...ever. I thank my mare for that.

    However, saying all that - if he is not what you want, there is nothing wrong with saying so. If you still see potential in him, and you think he is still "the one", I say stick it out. But, there is nothing worse than having a horse that you have no future with. Now, for myself, being not even close to a junior anymore - my needs have changed. While I still like a challenge, I need safety horse in my life
    This was my experience and kinda what I was thinking, too. Maybe not the ideal situation with the injury as well as being over-horsed, but sometimes things work out. I used to be terrified of my horse (she was a lesson horse at the barn I was in, used to cringe when I was assigned her. My trainer called her my "monster") and she knew it, and took total advantage of me. A year later I'd learned her quirks and was jumping her bareback. Many years later, I own her now. If the OP works with a competent trainer and the horse starts feeling better until she makes her decision about what to do with him, who knows. Maybe they'll click.
    *Wendy* 4.17.73 - 12.20.05



  14. #34
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    Oct. 16, 2011
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    But I do stress working with a good trainer, for the safety of all involved. Good luck OP.
    *Wendy* 4.17.73 - 12.20.05



  15. #35
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    Apr. 21, 2010
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    I would cut your losses. This could prove to be a long, and heartbreaking ordeal.

    If you knew all these things when you looked at the horse, would you have bought him? If the answer is NO, get out before you get super attached. Call it a loss, because honestly, a grand is nothing. You are going to pay far more than that on rehab/boarding/training, etc. And that's on the HOPE he'll be sound. At best "light riding"??? So you have an unsuitable horse, for "light riding" that you will maintain for the next 20 years, while having another horse.

    Why waste years and years of time on him, when you could find a horse that ALREADY has the qualities you want, right now???


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2010
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    Where humidity isn't just a word, it's a way of life.
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    What does your trainer say?
    Have you told her everything you've said here and asked her, who can actually see the horse to evaluate whether going forward is a good idea, what she thinks about the two of you as a team?



  17. #37
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    Feb. 18, 2003
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    Alberta
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    I too bought my current horse with my horse and a year and a half later, it's time for me to move on . (post 8 on this thread has what's going on)
    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...d.php?t=371729

    Lucky for me, my trainer is fabulous and generous to a fault and wants to take some responsibility as she advised me to buy Lacey. We do have a path forward that amazingly is not going to cost me anything, BUT I couldn't do it without her help. Although, even if it was going to cost me, I'd be doing the same thing. Some horses just aren't cut out for jr/ammie rides and mistakes or just don't want to be in the job they are doing.

    Sadly, I've found out the hard way....sometimes no matter how hard you try, it's just not meant to be!
    Go Ahead: This is a dare, not permission. Don't Do It!



  18. #38
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    Aug. 17, 2012
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    South Range, WI
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    Quote Originally Posted by MoonoverMississippi View Post
    What does your trainer say?
    Have you told her everything you've said here and asked her, who can actually see the horse to evaluate whether going forward is a good idea, what she thinks about the two of you as a team?
    Had a talk with my trainer. She advised to wait until the end of the month and re-evaluate his progress then. She will help me try to place him (if the original seller doesn't want him back she works closely with several rescues) if I decide to do that.

    She doesn't anticipate a lot of problems getting him trained. She said he might always be a bit "Thoroughbreddy" (which obviously I would've gotten with an OTTB as well) and if I decide I don't like that, we can sell/place him then.

    She said she was worried at first when he moved out stiffly but said it worked out very quickly and he was moving smoothly within a few minutes. We had the massage therapist work on him yesterday and he was an angel, not freaking out at all about the therapist standing over him on a stool and working on his muscles. There was a lot of tightness in his wither/neck area and even I could see how much better he moved after the session. The stiffness in the saddle area could definitely have contributed to his touchiness with the saddle.

    Today the vet's going to have a look at him and we'll see what they say. The next training session is scheduled for Sunday so I'm going to keep an open mind and see how he does then.

    I think my trainer's suggestion of reevaluating at the end of the month is a good idea.

    Oh, and for the person who asked about the rescue, I didn't actually get him from the rescue. His former owner was simply boarding him there (the rescue owner is a friend of hers).



  19. #39
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    OMG. "Thoroughbreddy?!?!" Now I really question your trainer's qualifications as well.


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  20. #40
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    Feb. 22, 2009
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    Thoroughbreddy? If by that does she mean has a huge heart, great brain, and is athletic? Because that is the only thing I can think of if someone says their horse is Thoroughbreddy.............


    3 members found this post helpful.

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