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  1. #81
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    Jun. 24, 2006
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    My concern is not the green part, or the bucking with a saddle part... it is the not sure he is sound part. So hard to truly evaluate the horse's behavior if you always have a nagging thought that he may not be 100% sound. And NQR horses are VERY hard to sell for good reason. Your vet's evaluation, IMO, was too basic for me. The whole sensitive from being green thing could be true, but the fact that he reacted to palpation of his back could still mean it is bothering him which could make much bigger problems now or later on.

    Regardless I appreciate how responsible you are being, I just hate the thought of you getting into a bad situation with the horse when you may be able to get out now. The two horses I bought with my heart worked out great, but I have had others that were a truly bad fit that I had for years because I was being "responsible". I loved them and I learned from them so I do not regret it but objectively... it sucked.


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  2. #82
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2012
    Location
    South Range, WI
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    267

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    Quote Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' View Post
    And so far, I'm the only person on that thread who said the horse never did work out.
    Actually, I posted about a horse that didn't work out for me.


    Quote Originally Posted by BansheeBreeze View Post
    The "trainer" is a moron, I don't know what in the heck she is attempting to do with the poor horse but she's doing it all wrong and confusing the heck out of him. If this is how their "groundwork" went, then you can just assume the horse has never had any groundwork of any usefulness. Then you got him, how much work was done with him between the time he got to your barn and his first ride?
    Yeah, I wasn't impressed with the trainer either, which is why I assumed she wasn't so much a "trainer" as she was a friend of the owner working with the horse for free.

    I'm honestly not sure how much work was done and I don't know if the owner was, either. The horse was kept at the "trainer's" place. The owner got him back, got bucked off, and then sent him back to the trainer. The trainer went away to college, and the owner moved him to the rescue.

    I would literally go back to square one with this horse.
    Yes, that's what my trainer thinks, too.

    Since you said he passed the vet check, just give him time. Not time off, but groundwork time. REAL groundwork time. Get comfortable with him, get him comfortable with you. Don't assume he knows anything, don't rush, don't skip steps. If you take it slow and steady, he should have no excuse to buck or react that way.
    We're going to take one week to let him recover from the respiratory infection. I'll still be handling him, of course, but no real work until he's feeling better. Then, we'll take things slow with groundwork.

    Quote Originally Posted by magicteetango View Post
    My concern is not the green part, or the bucking with a saddle part... it is the not sure he is sound part. So hard to truly evaluate the horse's behavior if you always have a nagging thought that he may not be 100% sound. And NQR horses are VERY hard to sell for good reason. Your vet's evaluation, IMO, was too basic for me. The whole sensitive from being green thing could be true, but the fact that he reacted to palpation of his back could still mean it is bothering him which could make much bigger problems now or later on.
    I talked with my regular vet today (the one that I use for my horses that are at my parents' house). I described how Ozzy flinches when I run my hand down his spine while applying pressure or if I'm currying him, but if I actually just apply pressure to various points on his spine, he's perfectly fine. My vet said to check him for Lyme, as he's seen that symptom in horses that have Lyme, even if they have no other symptoms. So, that might be our next step if he doesn't improve.



  3. #83
    Join Date
    Apr. 19, 2011
    Location
    Madison, GA
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    OP - As a fellow paint owner and lover you really need to get radiographs of his feet if he takes an "off step" here and there. Navicular runs rampant in QHs an Paints and radiographs can give you an idea of if he has it now or if he may be prone to it in the future.

    I know you don't want to spend much money on him up front, but if after a few months you decide he's a keeper and he still takes off steps here and there the piece of mind alone is worth it. My paint (horse in my profile) was taking off steps here and there a few months ago so I had him radiographed and I am now happy to know my guy has a well balanced hoof and should never end up with navicular... He just has a multitude of other issues because he's a jumping halter horse

    Good luck, he's a cutie
    Southern Cross Guest Ranch
    An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia
    www.southcross.com
    RIP Bocephus March 2008 - April 2013


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #84
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2012
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    South Range, WI
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    I should've clarified that the "off step" is with the right hind - the side with the injured hip. It's more like... every once in awhile his stride is slightly shorter on that side.



  5. #85
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    Apr. 19, 2011
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    Madison, GA
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    Quote Originally Posted by nikelodeon79 View Post
    I should've clarified that the "off step" is with the right hind - the side with the injured hip. It's more like... every once in awhile his stride is slightly shorter on that side.
    Oh okay, with you now.
    Southern Cross Guest Ranch
    An All Inclusive Guest Ranch Vacation - Georgia
    www.southcross.com
    RIP Bocephus March 2008 - April 2013



  6. #86
    Join Date
    Nov. 16, 2004
    Location
    NE Indiana
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    5,528

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    Vet him before making any big decisions. He looks cute to me .



  7. #87
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    Jul. 21, 2006
    Location
    South Carolina
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    Quote Originally Posted by NCRider View Post
    I would guess that a lot of people who made unadvisable horse purchases that didn't work out are out of horses entirely and unlikely to be reading this message board. kudos to you Paint for being so philosophical about the whole experience.

    To me confidence is the single most ingredient in becoming a better rider which is why when I read about timid riders taking on unwise projects I fear for not only their safety but also their enjoyment of horses in general.
    Thanks. I guess I forgot to mention the 20 something yr old packer I bought next to rebuild my shattered nerves. Bram is why I'm still riding. And he's standing right outside my window as I type this- 32 yrs old and a joy to have around. He's retired, but he keeps a watchful eye on me and the 11 yr old QH I've been riding the past few years.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #88
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
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    Go ahead and run a lyme titer now. The treatment (and test) are not that costly, and worth it to rule it out. It is the first test I run when I am not quite sure what is wrong and neither is the vet. I live in a heavy lyme area so IMO it is always worth it to check.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #89
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2012
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    South Range, WI
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    Just a quick update:

    Oz is now healthy and in training. My trainer has ridden him several times. He's very willing and tends to look to his rider when he's uncertain about something. The rodeo bronc performance hasn't been repeated since I had him worked on by the massage therapist.

    So far, so good.


    17 members found this post helpful.

  10. #90
    Join Date
    Mar. 30, 2004
    Location
    Lexington, KY
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    I think you had that Oh S%$T moment that anyone has when they bring a new animal home for the first time, they do one silly thing that makes your heart momentarily stop and you think "Oh my lord, should I have really done that, or should I have waited for ...whatever..." I had a horse who was truly awful as my first horse. Didn't tie, didn't stall, didn't blanket, didn't ride well, spooked at everything, had her front hoof resectioned, ran through a fence and got part of it stuck in her abdomen and it didn't come out until three months later, and after two years she stayed sound for the next 20 years and was the best, most quiet horse at any show or at her barn. I've also bought a horse with my head, he was great, and was injured two weeks after I bought him and is still not rideable three years later after extensive diagnostics. I say get a horse you like, and see what he likes, and do that. I don't mind the three year lameness because I adore this horse. I just like him. He's my buddy. Every new horse owner has a moment like you did, just keep working with your trainer and do what you're doing. It sounds like it's working. Oh, and take deep breaths
    send some of their smart literate deer who can read road signs up here since ours are just run of the mill dumb ones who get splatted all over creation because they won't stay in the woods


    4 members found this post helpful.

  11. #91
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    Oct. 13, 2007
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    681

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    I did not see this the first time around, but I did something along the same lines. I bought a four year old after seeing him once in person. Got him home and fairly quickly realized that a much more accurate description would have been "barely broke", "has human trust issues", not "husband safe trail horse". It was a long process, but we are schooling PSG now. Sometimes these horses do work out.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  12. #92
    Join Date
    Jul. 21, 2006
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    South Carolina
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    Good news! Thanks for the update.



  13. #93
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    Aug. 5, 2012
    Location
    OH
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    Glad to see things are working out. Don't feel too badly, just did the same thing as you a few months back. Complete impulse purchase. I almost immediately regretted my decision, but things are working out. In the end, not the best fit, but heck, as long as no one gets hurt and you've got a trainer involved, no harm done and a fantastic learning opportunity.



  14. #94
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    Aug. 17, 2012
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    South Range, WI
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    Just another quick update:
    I went ahead and purchased another month of training because I don't feel ready for Oz quite yet. He's still song great, but hasn't gotten to the point where my trainer has tested him with any rider mistakes. She's a superb rider and I'm... not. Lol!

    Starting Friday I'm going to be joining a class made up of mostly ladies my age and older.. Should be a lot of fun and really prepare me better for actually riding Oz. Getting laid off from my job has a few perks... Mostly more time!



  15. #95
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2012
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    South Range, WI
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    Update:

    A lot has happened since I last posted. Obie (what we've started calling him: Oskar Blues = O.B. = Obie) injured himself on the fence in March. He cut his hock. It wasn't too bad, but we put him on antibiotics because there was a pocket. After several weeks off to heal, he went back into training.

    I got a new job in February and my life got pretty crazy. As a result, I wasn't able to participate as much with his training. I did get out to take lessons a couple times per month.

    In June my trainer felt he was ready for me to ride.... and he cut himself again. Same spot, but this time it was much worse. He required over two months off this time. He then went back into training and I rode him for the first time on September 7, 2013.

    Of course he made me nervous by giving a lazy buck for the trainer. He has a tendency to tense up for the first few strides and she thinks that he was extra nervous because we were in the round pen, and he hadn't been ridden in there for awhile.

    At any rate, she settled him down and then it was my turn. We walked & trotted, and I ended the ride in one piece.

    I've ridden him three more times since then. Every time I get a bit more confident and treat him less like a ticking time bomb.

    I never anticipated this sort of apprehension/fear. I used to ride green horses all time, but after a few years off (and becoming a mom with a little person who depends on me), I lost all my confidence.

    I still haven't decided whether he's going to be the best horse for me. He's got beautiful movement and a great temperament, and my trainer said if I want to do dressage he can get me the scores. However, I need to decide if he's too much horse for me.

    Right now I'm taking my time. My husband advised me to take my time and give him a fair chance, so that's what I'm doing. I'm continuing my lessons on the school horses, but when Obie is ready I'll be riding him in group lessons as well as my individual training sessions.


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  16. #96
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2003
    Location
    Brenham, TX
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    Good for you for recognizing the need to have him in training and for you to take lessons on schoolies! Hope things continue to go well.
    Triple J Ranch Sporthorses
    www.triplejsporthorse.com
    Member - OMGiH I LOFF my mare(s) clique



  17. #97
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    May. 20, 2008
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    Thanks for the update - I love hearing how things go on these threads!



  18. #98
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    Apr. 20, 2011
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    I'm *sorta* in the same boat-- took home an OTTB gelding in 2011, against trainer's advice as he had an "ankle" ..... we were originally looking for a new hunter prospect for me, but hubs really fell in love with this guy, so our thinking was at the very least he could be a trail ride for the hubby.... due to some family circumstances, gelding had to sit for over 1 1/2 yrs, just recently was restarted.

    the good news is that our guy has a really good mind, and is very very quiet. I've just moved him to the trainer's barn (out of our backyard) and he's been getting a couple of professional rides a week, plus I'm feeling safe enough that I get on a few times a week to get my exercise and get some work in on him. I'm in NO way saying I can teach this guy anything, I'm not that kind of rider, but he lets me perch up there and enjoy my 1/2 hr w/t/c.

    we're thinking that the time off he had enabled him to really heal, and we're not over training now, so hoping he'll end up being my green hunter for next year's shows!

    good luck to you OP, hoping that with each ride you become more and more confident and in the end you can say "I learned alot and am happy I took a chance and bought him" :-)



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