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  1. #1
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2005
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    Houston TX
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    Default Are all alfalfa pellets dusty?

    I am having doubts about continuing to feed the alfalfa pellets we just got.
    When scooping them out etc there are clouds of green "dust".
    It bothers me to inhale the dust and I am sure it is not good for my horse - fed dry. I have even noticed the green powder in his nostrils.

    I don't recall "brand" alfalfa pellets being this dusty. The feed store buys the pellets in bulk and bags them on site. Could that be the difference?

    TIA. (trying these in a slow feeder so cannot soak)
    Lyme Disease - please excuse my comprehension difficultes



  2. #2
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    May. 10, 2001
    Location
    NW Washington
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    1,069

    Default

    I feed the Standlee pellets and haven't ever seen them dusty.



  3. #3
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    Default

    The Standlee brand no, nut the AlfaGreen are almost always dusty for me. I switched to cubes and those aren't dusty.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  4. #4
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Default

    But* (not nut, stupid phone)
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  5. #5
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    May. 26, 2005
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    Houston TX
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    Default

    Thanks. The pellets I got seem to crumble - I guess in handling.

    So the Standlee pellets seem to hold up better and don't end up in a pulverized powder?

    What size are they?
    Lyme Disease - please excuse my comprehension difficultes



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
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    5,182

    Default

    IMO its probably due to the handling and bagging. I get the Standalee when I'm that direction, but otherwise I prefer another brand due to how hard they are, both cubes and pellets. I feed mine soaked a bit and Standalee takes FOREVER to break down in water compared to all the other brands I've fed. I figure that if they're that hard to break down in water, they must be harder to chew as well, increasing the risk of choke. My Arab inhales his feed and has choked once before.



  7. #7
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    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
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    Default

    I don't like pellets that crumble; they don't all do that. IME Lakeland crumble pretty bad but I have been feeding an Equis brand pellet that doesn't at all.



  8. #8
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hampton Bay View Post
    IMO its probably due to the handling and bagging. I get the Standalee when I'm that direction, but otherwise I prefer another brand due to how hard they are, both cubes and pellets. I feed mine soaked a bit and Standalee takes FOREVER to break down in water compared to all the other brands I've fed. I figure that if they're that hard to break down in water, they must be harder to chew as well, increasing the risk of choke. My Arab inhales his feed and has choked once before.
    This. I hate Standlee...because of the hardness and the length of time they take to soak. I use cubes of another brand & always soak.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Location
    Saco, Maine
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    Default

    Why do you feed them dry? Soak them, the dust won't matter.
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2011
    Posts
    63

    Default

    Soak Standlee in hot water. Takes only a few minutes to soften. Been feeding them for a couple of years, mixed with Timothy cubes. Horses love them. No dust, no muss, no bother!



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
    Location
    down south
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    Default

    I use standlee and soak them. Never have a dust issue before soaked and soaking only takes mine a minute to soften. I put hot water in the buckets and put the four horses in their stalls that they are standing right next to ready to eat and feed. Takes really a minute. Those that say they don't soak well do you use hot water? Cold water does take them longer.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole



  12. #12
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    Nov. 13, 2007
    Location
    NW Louisiana
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    Default

    I don't like to feed my horses hot food when it's 100 degrees outside. Other brands take a few minutes in cool water, Standalee takes an hour in hot water. I think with them, you're paying a bunch just for the name. I've yet to have quality issues with the other brands I've fed, so I don't buy that they are much better quality either.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
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    Default

    like others have said, Standley aren't dusty but they are as hard as a rock.

    We have three brands around here, one is dusty, one is hard, and the last is just right (not dusty or hard).

    just mix a little water in with the pellets to keep down the dust.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2009
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    2,576

    Default

    Yes, as others have mentioned, Standley pellets are not dusty. OMG the co-op theirs are horribly dusty, and also not very green.

    Standlee is VERY good quality. Hands down.

    Yes water them down if dusty.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Location
    Evansville, Wisconsin
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    Default

    I'm not sure what brand I have, but there was some dust when I poured them into the metal trash can I store them in. Nothing noticeable when I scoop out a bit for feeding, though.
    "In order to really enjoy a dog, one doesn’t merely train him to be semi-human. The point of it is to open oneself to the possibility of becoming part dog."
    -Edward Hoagland



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
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    2,436

    Default

    I guess I'm weird because I soak my pellets at the feeding before. So, at breakfast, I set up my night feeding, and I put my pellets in a bucket, add water, and leave it to soak until the night feeding.

    If its summer, I just put the bucket in the house or a temperature controlled area, and cover it.

    Oh, and I use Standlee. But I did experience dust with another brand, and I didn't worry much about it, after asking the same question online.



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by grayarabs View Post
    (trying these in a slow feeder so cannot soak)
    From the OP as a reminder for those suggesting she soak.

    If you're feeding them in a slow feeder, like one of those they can roll around and they drop out, the dust still should not be a problem, even if there is a little pellet dust.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  18. #18
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2005
    Location
    Houston TX
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    Default

    Thanks.
    So it would not be a good idea to feed the Standlee pellets unsoaked?

    FWIW my horse has COPD and in the past received soaked alfalfa pellets/cubes. That is my concern about the dry dust/powder.

    So if Standlee pellets are considered too hard - that leaves me with
    the feed store pellets. I used a collander last night to shake out the dust/powder. That made things better for him (I think) but I still inhaled some dust. Need to figure out how to better do it.

    Horse is now receiving Chaffhaye - slow-fed - in a jug - the pellets help with the whole process. I had hoped the Chaffhaye would be absorbing most of the pellet dust when we shake the jugs - just don't think it works as well as I had hoped.

    Thanks all.
    Lyme Disease - please excuse my comprehension difficultes



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Posts
    500

    Default

    I also live in the Houston area. This has been a very bad year for my COPD horse. I'm not sure why. maybe the weather, maybe because more of the farmers around me planted cotton with all the spraying that comes with that. First time in years I have had to use steroids.

    Anyway, I feed the Standlee pellets, because they are the best quality I can find in the area. Never dusty, Never have bits of corn. I dont think they are to hard to feed dry and that how I feed them to him. I have a mare that I soak them because she bolts her food and I find they soak quickly.

    The biggest draw back is that it is about the same price for a 40# bag.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 26, 2005
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    Houston TX
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    Default

    Dumb questions.
    How do you know if your horse bolts food?

    Horses are supposed to chew the pellets, right? Choke comes from unchewed pellets?

    I have been watching and listening to my horse when he is eating.
    I really cannot tell a thing.

    I know I have seen dogs eat that one would swear the dry kibbles are just swallowed and not chewed. Surely horses don't do that?

    Do horses "know" to crunch down on each pellet? Especially when the pellets are larger than average?
    Lyme Disease - please excuse my comprehension difficultes



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