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  1. #1
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    Feb. 16, 2012
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    Question Different feet on the same horse - Update People are gone! So are the horses :(

    I have a mare at my barn that I recently started trimming my self (why is a long story) anyway after my farrier went MIA I took a good look at her feet, she's not my horse so I can't say I ever really paid attention. one front hoof is way more oval and pointy and the other is more round and shorter. when I pick them up their the same on the bottom, one roundish and the other more elongated, her heels are run under on both feet.

    As far as her rears go the frog is almost offset from the center.... and they flare pretty quickly after a trim. I will post pictures later when I have help.

    I've trimmed her twice already (once when overgrown 9ish weeks then again after 4 weeks) and she actually seems to be moving a bit better but my question is do i try to shape the hooves more or do i need to trim them the way her sole is shaped? I'm not sure if she needs "correction" or if that would be like making someone with two different sized feet wear two of the same shoe?
    Last edited by Stushica; Oct. 20, 2012 at 05:14 PM.



  2. #2
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    Oct. 18, 2008
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    Deschapelles, Haiti
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    Can you clean her feet and take pictures? Hard for the hoofpro's to give you an answer without seeing the feet.
    HAS provides hospital care to 340,000 people in Haiti's Artibonite Valley 24/7/365/earthquake/cholera/whatever.
    www.hashaiti.org blog:http://hashaiti.org/blog



  3. #3
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    Nov. 9, 2005
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    uk
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stushica View Post
    I have a mare at my barn that I recently started trimming my self (why is a long story) anyway after my farrier went MIA I took a good look at her feet, she's not my horse so I can't say I ever really paid attention. one front hoof is way more oval and pointy and the other is more round and shorter. when I pick them up their the same on the bottom, one roundish and the other more elongated, her heels are run under on both feet.

    As far as her rears go the frog is almost offset from the center.... and they flare pretty quickly after a trim. I will post pictures later when I have help.

    I've trimmed her twice already (once when overgrown 9ish weeks then again after 4 weeks) and she actually seems to be moving a bit better but my question is do i try to shape the hooves more or do i need to trim them the way her sole is shaped? I'm not sure if she needs "correction" or if that would be like making someone with two different sized feet wear two of the same shoe?
    this why people need qualified farriers

    go here www.horseshoes.com plenty of farriers there

    dont muck about with horses feet if you havent got a clue sorry but what you have put is a serious red flag



  4. #4
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    Feb. 16, 2012
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    TN
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    yeah, didn't have anyone with me this morning to hold her feet for me... I will have them up tonight!!



  5. #5
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    Feb. 16, 2012
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    TN
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    My previous (fantastic!!!) farrier worked with me teaching me on a few of our horses in the past but it's been a while and he's retired and I've moved.... I've gone though three different farriers, given them all about 3-6 months and just watched as their feet got worse, The last one did have his Farrier I certificate and seemed to do a good job but I did have lame horses at one point and when I brought him back out he fixed a few things horses weren't lame and then he disappeared. she is one of two horses that may be in the middle of an abandonment. they owe months on board and farrier services when the farrier disappeared. I can handle two horses but not three and the land owner basically asked me if I could just keep them feed and in decent shape until he can lawyer up and figure out what to do with what he thought was his "buddy's" Horses. yeah my feed, my hay, my time, and my sawdust. BTW I was fired on monday, which wasn't my fault (I actually feel bad for my boss) and she's a pasture ornament right now, If I do nothing I live in the land of even more ignorance where it doesn't even occur to people that horses need their feet trimmed, let alone by a professional.. which this area seems to be lacking.

    I am not a permeant solution for this horse just filling in while I get to start my farrier hunt all over and hope i don't end up with another dumbarse wielding a rasp and nippers.

    sorry for the rant, I'm just pretty peed off at this guy and there may be a bit of displaced aggression going on.



  6. #6
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    Feb. 16, 2012
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    TN
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    I have uploaded feet pix here for you to look at, he hind feet are a mess too anyway as you can see she's pretty crooked and toes in horribly....

    http://caffeinephotography.smugmug.c...7798&k=9ks7Gh6



  7. #7
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    Dec. 13, 1999
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    Greensboro, NC
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    They aren't horrible, they just need some good, regular trimming. The toes are long and the heels are long and underrun. It's nothing one good trim can't go a long way towards fixing, and a few good trims are short enough intervals could have these feet in much better shape

    Don't try to make feet match - it's very common for them not to. You will probably find her healthy feet have a bit of a higher/lower mismatch going on.

    The sole is more oblong because the toes are and have been too long for a while. Knowing where to bring the breakover back is they biggest key to getting the foot more round. It won't matter how often you trim if you never bring the BO back as far as the foot allows, or where it belongs, whichever is the more suitable place in a given trim - you won't get the foot where it should be.

    The heels also need to be trimmed back to the widest part of the frog every time - I don't really see anything that would prevent that this very moment. I see lots of room for the BO to be moved back.

    The problem is, if you don't know how to locate the correct breakover point, while you might not hurt anything, you won't make the or as much progress you need to make.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  8. #8
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    Sep. 7, 2011
    Location
    Cool, CA
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    The dorsal wall needs to be brought back, and the right front looks a little smaller than the left. Nothing terribly unusual in 80% of the horses I see.
    A couple good trims or shoeings, and the feet should look even better.
    Matthew Kiwala
    Foothill Farriers
    (530) 870-4390



  9. #9
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    Feb. 16, 2012
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    TN
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    Thanks for the info guys I've brought her heals back 1/8 to a 1/4in already I was just worried about too much too soon and causing tendon issues I'll post pictures after I trim her again... she's always kind and tries to kill whomever is messing with her feet, She's getting better but it's still a fight most days.

    I'm glad her feet weren't terribly abnormal, the other two upon closer inspection have very mildly different feet.



  10. #10
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stushica View Post
    Thanks for the info guys I've brought her heals back 1/8 to a 1/4in already I was just worried about too much too soon and causing tendon issues . . .
    Heels so long the frog doesn't touch the ground cause deep sulcus thrush issues . . . split right through the heel bulbs.



  11. #11
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    Feb. 18, 2006
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    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stushica View Post
    T I was just worried about too much too soon and causing tendon issues
    Based on your photos, you've already got 'em.

    I'll post pictures after I trim her again... she's always kind and tries to kill whomever is messing with her feet, She's getting better but it's still a fight most days.
    The get someone who knows what they are doing and support them by administering chemical restraint.



  12. #12
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Burten View Post
    The get someone who knows what they are doing and support them by administering chemical restraint.
    Are you volunteering for the trip?


    If you read the posts, OP has been struggling to find any farrier that knows what they are doing.

    And this is not her horse.



  13. #13
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    After seeing the pictures I figured things must be pretty desperate when you have to mark the feet R and L so the farrier knows the difference.



  14. #14
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    I suspect that was for the esteemed online viewers



  15. #15
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    Feb. 16, 2012
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    TN
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    After seeing the pictures I figured things must be pretty desperate when you have to mark the feet R and L so the farrier knows the difference.
    LMAO!!

    I just wanted to update and thank those that posted... 2 days after their eviction date I got that I need to go check on my horse pronto feeling. It was about 11:30pm and I found them with a trailer that had an old half rotting wooden pallet propped on two cinder blocks behind it like a "ramp" Poor horse had a rope double knotted around each rear pastern and was proceeding to plant her feet and not move.... Needless to say I was pretty horrified. Gingers in the 16 hand range and i wouldn't put anything over 15 Hands in this trailer Apparently they had been there for almost 5 hours and couldn't get her in.... shocking really It took me about an hour to get her in the trailer and despite promising to let her out after I got her in so we could maybe trainher they slammed the door and told me it would be of they'd just leave her in there overnight so she wouldn't be scared of it anymore. *facepalm* This guy is such an over entitled idiot

    I'm so so so glad the people are gone but I feel horrible for their horses, I get super attached to them all and she had such a huge huge turn around with her temperament after I started messing with her

    That being said I'd gladly accept a trip down to trim my horse!
    She's usually good for the farrier, and I bring cookiesss

    I looked on the posted website, and didn't see anything in my area, but if you hear of anyone please do let me know!



  16. #16
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    Feb. 16, 2012
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    PS I passed along some foot info to him but if I had to guess it would be ignored along with the warnings to not tie the horses to the trampoline, or use ratchet ties as lead lines, and that girths are necessary to keep the saddle on top, corn is bad, and that their bit is too small and rubs her mouth.....



  17. #17
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stushica View Post
    and that girths are necessary to keep the saddle on top, ...
    Not always true. I used a girth that was way too big once on a trail ride after determining that I had a horse with a well sprung barrel and some withers. It was a chance, admittedly, but me and my saddle didn't slip nor slide. The gal with the roly poly mutton withered type and bad balance, she had to get off and have her saddle readjusted at least three times, with the girth so tight it was digging in.

    I live in the middle of Horse Country and it can still be hard to find a decent farrier. Track trimmers often only deal with horses for months and then they are on to the next crop. Dealing with hoof issues over the long term, ie keeping an eye on a hoof that wants to grow funny, isn't their forte.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  18. #18
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    Feb. 16, 2012
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    TN
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    I've had a few "girth-less" competitions myself... however they took the girth and off billet (western saddle) off than ran the billet under her stomach and tied it to the stirrup using square knots and then they told me she tried to bite them when they were trying to get on.... eventually they removed the entire fender and tried to tie the billet to the tree but it wasn't long enough and then they couldn't get the stirrup back on so there was no way to mount so they gave up.....

    I just don't get what's with these guys and I can't really say i'm glad i'm not the only one lol that would just be mean



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