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  1. #1
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Default Educated me on the effects of wide webbed shoes and onion shoes

    What are the pros and cons of these shoes? What are the benefits of wide webbed shoes? Do onion shoes give additional heal support or are they more of a gimmick? Which one will give better support? Are there any drawbacks or possible drawbacks?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2011
    Location
    Cool, CA
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    An onion shoe, is an orthopedic 'fix' for horses with corns. If you need more heel support, ie: a horse with low/underrun heels, you're better off with a straight bar shoe, and possibly some Equithane pad material to help support the heels.

    Wide webbed shoes, are good for horses working in hard or rocky ground, as they give a little bit more protection to the foot. (Wide webbed shoes are almost all I use in my area, due to a granitic area, and trail-riding clients)

    As always: Your Mileage May Vary.
    Matthew Kiwala
    Foothill Farriers
    (530) 870-4390



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    Default

    Wide webbed shoes offer more protection, offer more 'float' on soft ground and also provide more support for the hoof.

    Onion heel shoes are a variation of the wide webbed shoe and in fact are often forged out of a wide webbed shoe.
    The Onion shoe (French term for a "corn") protects the seat of corn from ground pressure and provides more "float" to the heel area by limiting heel penetration in soft ground. It offers good heel support with rolling shoe over the toe and collateral aspects of the foot.

    When forged from a keg shoe, the modification is also referred to as a 'thumbprint' and its location can be set as needed for the individual pplication.

    Uses:
    Mild clinical manifestations of prodotrochlear syndrome (navicular disease)/CHPS(Caudal Hoof Pain Syndrome). Also may be used in the rehabilitation of horses with deep digital flexor tendon or distal check ligament injuries. Also used when the heel(s) are contracted and 'hooking in' the heels of the shoe is contra-indicated.



  4. #4
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Burten View Post
    Wide webbed shoes offer more protection, offer more 'float' on soft ground and also provide more support for the hoof.

    Onion heel shoes are a variation of the wide webbed shoe and in fact are often forged out of a wide webbed shoe.
    The Onion shoe (French term for a "corn") protects the seat of corn from ground pressure and provides more "float" to the heel area by limiting heel penetration in soft ground. It offers good heel support with rolling shoe over the toe and collateral aspects of the foot.

    When forged from a keg shoe, the modification is also referred to as a 'thumbprint' and its location can be set as needed for the individual pplication.

    Uses:
    Mild clinical manifestations of prodotrochlear syndrome (navicular disease)/CHPS(Caudal Hoof Pain Syndrome). Also may be used in the rehabilitation of horses with deep digital flexor tendon or distal check ligament injuries. Also used when the heel(s) are contracted and 'hooking in' the heels of the shoe is contra-indicated.
    Where could I buy this shoe in titanium



  5. #5
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    Feb. 18, 2006
    Location
    east central Illinois and working north to the 'burbs
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fharoah View Post
    Where could I buy this shoe in titanium
    I have no idea........



  6. #6
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Default

    What are the pros and cons of aluminum?



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 30, 2006
    Location
    Little Rhody
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    Default

    Shouldn't you be discussing these things with YOUR farrier?



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 6, 2006
    Location
    Warren County, NJ
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    http://www.ac-concepts.com/fers-deta...it_categorie=2

    Mix of aluminium & titanium.
    Shoes don't wear well at all!
    I wasn't able to do any roadwork whatsoever with those.
    They also left a powdery residue on the hoof when in frequent contact with water or wet ground.

    You might be able to order them online. I believe my farrier got them from his regular farriersupply shop in Fl.

    Else call these people in Canada, they appear to carry some of the ACR shoes, I'm sure they could order you in an onion shoe.
    http://www.thehorsedepot.ca/horse-shoes.php



  9. #9
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rcloisonne View Post
    Shouldn't you be discussing these things with YOUR farrier?
    Yes my farrier and I have talked about it. He told me aluminum will rot the foot between the hoof and the shoe. But I am interested in a light weight shoe for a horse I think is sounder barefoot but vets think he needs the support of a shoe. So I am thinking of trying titanium.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2011
    Location
    Cool, CA
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    Looking through your post history, I'm going to have to recommend rose oil, and magnetic pastern bands.
    Matthew Kiwala
    Foothill Farriers
    (530) 870-4390



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2012
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    313

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    I use wide web on my pony who has small-ish feet with a history of mystery heel lameness from time to time. My farrier leaves as much heel support as possible and leave the foot as wide as possible. Neat shoe!



  12. #12
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rick Burten View Post
    Wide webbed shoes offer more protection, offer more 'float' on soft ground and also provide more support for the hoof.

    Onion heel shoes are a variation of the wide webbed shoe and in fact are often forged out of a wide webbed shoe.
    The Onion shoe (French term for a "corn") protects the seat of corn from ground pressure and provides more "float" to the heel area by limiting heel penetration in soft ground. It offers good heel support with rolling shoe over the toe and collateral aspects of the foot.

    When forged from a keg shoe, the modification is also referred to as a 'thumbprint' and its location can be set as needed for the individual pplication.

    Uses:
    Mild clinical manifestations of prodotrochlear syndrome (navicular disease)/CHPS(Caudal Hoof Pain Syndrome). Also may be used in the rehabilitation of horses with deep digital flexor tendon or distal check ligament injuries. Also used when the heel(s) are contracted and 'hooking in' the heels of the shoe is contra-indicated.
    So would you consider an onion shoe for a horse with a fused pastern?



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
    Location
    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Default

    Onion is the wrong food group. Fused pastern goes better with fruit. Banana shoe. Not sold in stores. Have to grow your own.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fharoah View Post
    Yes my farrier and I have talked about it. He told me aluminum will rot the foot between the hoof and the shoe. But I am interested in a light weight shoe for a horse I think is sounder barefoot but vets think he needs the support of a shoe. So I am thinking of trying titanium.
    As long as you are getting professional opinions, what does you hair stylist and lawyer think the horse needs? They get the exact same farrier courses as a veterinarian.



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    As long as you are getting professional opinions, what does you hair stylist and lawyer think the horse needs? They get the exact same farrier courses as a veterinarian.

    I understand your point. I am only using this forum to chime in on others experiences. I do not think there is anything wrong with that?

    So how about I rephrase. Have you ever used an onion shoe? For what reasons did you use it? Did you find them effective?

    (And yes we did lateral radiographs this past August and one foot was well shod and the other had long long toes and low heals. But my farrier was not present why I plan on having him shod at the clinic so my vet and farrier can work together to try and make sure the angles are as correct as possible. My farrier also has a great knows and respect for the vet I use so appreciates his advise. He told me shoeing at the clinic would be great!

    Again no advise just using this as learning and looking for a possible alternative to egg bar shoes. I do not think there is any harm in reading. And yes I am considering switching farriers but only because I am not sure I can afford what I am paying now long term.

    Thank you!



  16. #16
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    Nov. 13, 2009
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    Default

    If he is more sound barefoot, why on Earth do you have him in shoes?



  17. #17
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Port Charlotte, FL
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fharoah View Post
    . . . Have you ever used an onion shoe?
    Yes.

    For what reasons did you use it?
    To increase ground surface area of the shoe in the the heels and over the bars.

    Did you find them effective?
    I don't find any shoe very effective in and of itself. It is just a bent piece of metal with nail holes in it. The shoe has no intelligence or control over how it is fit, or how the hoof is prepared. The shoe does not take a history and maintain a baseline. The shoe does not think.



  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by FineAlready View Post
    If he is more sound barefoot, why on Earth do you have him in shoes?
    I told my vet he lost a shoe and seemed really comfortable happy without it. He still thinks the horse should stay shod. I want to shoe him at the clinic to make sure the angles are correct. If he is truly most comfortable barefoot then I will probably give that a try and want to adjust his shoeing first, make sure the angles are correct and the toes are not too long.



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Bloomer View Post
    Yes.

    To increase ground surface area of the shoe in the the heels and over the bars.

    I don't find any shoe very effective in and of itself. It is just a bent piece of metal with nail holes in it. The shoe has no intelligence or control over how it is fit, or how the hoof is prepared. The shoe does not take a history and maintain a baseline. The shoe does not think.
    When the trim is correct and the shoe fits as it needs to have you found onion shoes to benefit horses whom need heal support?



  20. #20
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    Nov. 22, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fharoah View Post
    When the trim is correct and the shoe fits as it needs to have you found onion shoes to benefit horses whom need heal support?
    First you need to explain exactly what you mean by the term "heal support."



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