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  1. #1
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    Aug. 1, 2008
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    Default Titanium shoes?

    On August's bill- which I am just paying now - I noticed I had been charged for TITANIUM shoes. ($125 more than the usual aluminum) I texted trainer, but have yet to hear back. Does anyone have experience with these? I assume because titanium is light, they will make my horse move better- And not that something is wrong with my guy. Input?
    When the boogeyman goes to sleep, he checks the closet for George Morris. -mpsbarnmanager



  2. #2
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    Jan. 2, 2008
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    Colorado Springs, CO
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    Default

    Unobtainium?



  3. #3
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    Sep. 21, 2000
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    Pawlet, VT US
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    Quote Originally Posted by lalahartma1 View Post
    Unobtainium?

    Expensium.
    madeline
    * What you release is what you teach * Don't be distracted by unwanted behavior* Whoever waits the longest is the teacher. Van Hargis



  4. #4
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    Jun. 19, 2001
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    Pacific NW
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    Titanium shoes are a bit heavier than aluminium, but substantially lighter (45%) than steel. They are more durable than aluminium (60% more dense, but 200% stronger), but are a more difficult metal to work. Some people feel that they may transmit more shock vibration to the hoof wall, but I haven't seen/searched any data on that personally.

    May your horse enjoy his couture dancing shoes....



  5. #5
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    Jun. 1, 2002
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    Indiana
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    Do they come with blue ribbons?

    You must be made of money for the farrier to not consult with you on that much of a price jump!



  6. #6
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    Apr. 11, 2004
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    North Florida
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    I used them years go........different farrier.......but he charged me the same for titanium and aluminum.However, I don't know the brands, etc.....that could be the difference.
    www.flyingcolorsfarm.comHome of pinto stallion Claim to Fame and his homozygous son, Counterclaim. Friend us on Facebook!https://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Fl...04678589573428



  7. #7
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    Jul. 22, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kestrel View Post
    Some people feel that they may transmit more shock vibration to the hoof wall, but I haven't seen/searched any data on that personally.
    This is what my farrier said about them.



  8. #8
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    Dec. 16, 2002
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    Leesburg, VA
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    Some of my clients' horses are in them. They get used for horses who wear out the aluminums too quickly. The titanium shoes are more expensive to purchase, and harder to work/forge but they hold up a lot longer than aluminums.



  9. #9
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    Jun. 13, 2000
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    hey i have a titanium rod in my leg. it is supposed to flex better than steel. that is why they use titanium rods in the tibia and femur.



  10. #10

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    Y'all 2 at the beginning made my day.



  11. #11
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    Jul. 10, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by TSWJB View Post
    hey i have a titanium rod in my leg. it is supposed to flex better than steel. that is why they use titanium rods in the tibia and femur.
    Actually no. The Ti6Al4V rods in your leg are stiffer than steel. That is a fundamental law of the physics of the solids. But they are lighter and tend to be better in corrosion resistance.

    Yes, titanium is a horrible shock absorber. I work/design titaniums for a variety of functions. In the methods that a farrier uses to make shoes, they destroy any of the ductility and shock absorption by unintentionally inducing what is call alpha-case into the shoe.

    Reed



  12. #12
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    Jan. 28, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAyers View Post
    Actually no. The Ti6Al4V rods in your leg are stiffer than steel. That is a fundamental law of the physics of the solids. But they are lighter and tend to be better in corrosion resistance.

    Yes, titanium is a horrible shock absorber. I work/design titaniums for a variety of functions. In the methods that a farrier uses to make shoes, they destroy any of the ductility and shock absorption by unintentionally inducing what is call alpha-case into the shoe.

    Reed
    in english please....lol
    "You can't really debate with someone who has a prescient invisible friend"
    carolprudm



  13. #13
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    Aug. 1, 2008
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    Thanks for all responses! That makes sense, as my guy does need the aluminum for movement, but they are PAPER thin at 4 weeks

    enjoytheride- sadly I am not BUT I do pour every cent into horses, much to hubby's disdain. Trainer makes decisions about horse care, not me. I trust her, and I don't know enough!
    When the boogeyman goes to sleep, he checks the closet for George Morris. -mpsbarnmanager



  14. #14
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    May. 5, 2008
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    61

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    Quote Originally Posted by RAyers View Post
    Actually no. The Ti6Al4V rods in your leg are stiffer than steel. That is a fundamental law of the physics of the solids. But they are lighter and tend to be better in corrosion resistance.

    Yes, titanium is a horrible shock absorber. I work/design titaniums for a variety of functions. In the methods that a farrier uses to make shoes, they destroy any of the ductility and shock absorption by unintentionally inducing what is call alpha-case into the shoe.

    Reed
    The Young's modulus of most Aluminum alloys is around 70, most titanium alloys around 110 and most steels around 200 (GPa). So assuming the same structural shape, ie same diameter rod and length, wouldn't a structure made of titanium be less stiff than steel but more stiff than aluminum?



  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by mroades View Post
    in english please....lol
    Titanium is fairly hard and stiff for a metal.

    When aluminum or steel fail, they start to bend in a 'plastic' way, meaning that they bend and instead of springing back, they stay bent. Keep stressing and it will fracture and break.

    Pounding titanium as a farrier does enhances the hardness and tends to add oxygen into the metal and microfractures. It is still very strong but when it fails it tends to skip right to the fracture, more like a ceramic.
    If you are allergic to a thing, it is best not to put that thing in your mouth, particularly if the thing is cats. - Lemony Snicket



  16. #16
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    Oct. 22, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alterrain View Post
    On August's bill- which I am just paying now - I noticed I had been charged for TITANIUM shoes. ($125 more than the usual aluminum) I texted trainer, but have yet to hear back. Does anyone have experience with these? I assume because titanium is light, they will make my horse move better- And not that something is wrong with my guy. Input?
    I used Titanium shoes about 15 years ago and was very happy with them. Horse was wearing out alum and needed round for support. Steel made him move like a donkey. The other perk to the titanium shoes was that they were so durable we were able to reset them at least twice if I remember correctly. They never broke although I understand that it is a more brittle metal than alum or steel.
    Tried to get them for current horse who also needs support. Have him in round alum now but he is a big guy and they wear out fast. Farrier said the die molds for the titanium shoes were VERY expensive....LOTS of $ and 1 person here had the patent???
    No shoes large enough were being made here in US that would fit my horse. If they were available, YES I would use them!



  17. #17
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    Jun. 13, 2000
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    Quote Originally Posted by RAyers View Post
    Actually no. The Ti6Al4V rods in your leg are stiffer than steel. That is a fundamental law of the physics of the solids. But they are lighter and tend to be better in corrosion resistance.

    Yes, titanium is a horrible shock absorber. I work/design titaniums for a variety of functions.
    Reed
    i had read that titanium flexes with the bone whereas steel doesnt as much. that is why they moved from steel rods to titanium rods.
    if its a horrible shock absorber then wouldnt it shatter my tibia if i had to say involuntary dismount and land on my leg? i have been very worried about this but the dr says its okay for the rod to remain in my leg....... wish i could remove it!



  18. #18
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    Nov. 18, 2004
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    New York, New York
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    Default titanium

    They are used on alot of race horses. MOre $$$, but I actually think evently they will be the future...



  19. #19
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    Jun. 19, 2001
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    Default

    RAyers, would adding a pad help reduce shock conduction?



  20. #20
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    Jun. 4, 2006
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    Default

    Would adding a pad make the titanium more shock absorbent.



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