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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 24, 2007
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    Default Spin-off - Clipping the dog that isn't normally clipped...

    I have an aging heeler/corgi mix that doesn't handle the summer heat well any more. I was contemplating clipping him just to get some of his coat off making him a bit cooler. Can it be done? Best way to do it?



  2. #2
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    Dec. 31, 2000
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    El Paso, TX
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    Super easy. Just go with the grain of hair. You can get an inexpensive brand of clippers and the set usually comes with blade attachments so you can leave hair not shaved too close.

    Ideally, wash and dry dog first.



  3. #3
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    Dec. 20, 2009
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    If you aren't brave enough to do it, take him/her to a groomer.
    "THEY" say that repeated clipping of a non-clip coat will ruin it. I had a chow mix that needed clipped due to allergies, and it did change his coat somewhat. But really, with an aging, mixed breed dog, comfort is more important. You could also think about doing the undercarriage clip - belly, lower sides, lower chest. See if that works, and maybe you wont need to do more.
    We don't get less brave; we get a bigger sense of self-preservation........



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Minnesota
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    I clipped my elderly Samoyed every spring with my big Clipmasters. Nothing special about it--clipped her as I would a horse. It was absolutely awesome for her and I think it prolonged her life.

    I did have to groom her carefully in the fall, as her coat would mat more easily then--I think it had to do with the even length of the undercoat and guard hairs. Well worth it, though.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2013
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    Look... I'm a groomer and I want you to know that clipping your dog isn't going to help it with the heat. In fact it will increase its chance of heat stroke and sunburn. It is like taking insulation out of your house. Brush your dog with a good slicker brush don't shave it. We often make a lot more money clipping non-clip coats than just bathing them but I hate doing it because I feel awful since it isn't going to help the dog stay cooler and could actually make it much much hotter. Unless your dog is severely matted I strongly suggest you do not cut the hair. Please do some research on your own before you go along with this silly myth that clipping double coated breeds keeps them cool.
    To understand via the heart is not to understand.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2011
    Location
    Phillipsburg Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jhein12 View Post
    Look... I'm a groomer and I want you to know that clipping your dog isn't going to help it with the heat. In fact it will increase its chance of heat stroke and sunburn. It is like taking insulation out of your house. Brush your dog with a good slicker brush don't shave it. We often make a lot more money clipping non-clip coats than just bathing them but I hate doing it because I feel awful since it isn't going to help the dog stay cooler and could actually make it much much hotter. Unless your dog is severely matted I strongly suggest you do not cut the hair. Please do some research on your own before you go along with this silly myth that clipping double coated breeds keeps them cool.
    THIS!
    I was just going to say this. If you are going to clip a non clip breed, at least do it in very early spring so their body has a chance to adjust to the extra heat their shorter coat causes.
    ~Former Pet Store Manager (10yrs)
    ~Vintage Toy Dealer (rememberswhen.us)
    ~Vet Tech Student
    Mom to : 1 Horse, 4 Dogs, 3 Cats, 6 (Former) Stepkids


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
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    Minnesota
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jhein12 View Post
    Look... I'm a groomer and I want you to know that clipping your dog isn't going to help it with the heat. In fact it will increase its chance of heat stroke and sunburn. It is like taking insulation out of your house. Brush your dog with a good slicker brush don't shave it. We often make a lot more money clipping non-clip coats than just bathing them but I hate doing it because I feel awful since it isn't going to help the dog stay cooler and could actually make it much much hotter. Unless your dog is severely matted I strongly suggest you do not cut the hair. Please do some research on your own before you go along with this silly myth that clipping double coated breeds keeps them cool.
    Have you ever actually OWNED one of these dogs? And lived with it through a hot summer clipped versus unclipped? Because I have and I disagree with you 100%.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2011
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    Phillipsburg Ohio
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    Have you ever actually OWNED one of these dogs? And lived with it through a hot summer clipped versus unclipped? Because I have and I disagree with you 100%.
    Yes, I have. She was much much more miserable the year we clipped her- so I looked into the science. Thick coats reflect heat and sun, sort of like loose clothing favored by desert dwellers.
    ~Former Pet Store Manager (10yrs)
    ~Vintage Toy Dealer (rememberswhen.us)
    ~Vet Tech Student
    Mom to : 1 Horse, 4 Dogs, 3 Cats, 6 (Former) Stepkids


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Oct. 21, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simkie View Post
    Have you ever actually OWNED one of these dogs? And lived with it through a hot summer clipped versus unclipped? Because I have and I disagree with you 100%.
    Yes I have... looking at the anatomy of the coat it is common sense that it provides insulation and protection against the sun. You might be thinking of their coat like a winter coat on a person but it is not the same at all. This isn't new information either. Maybe it makes you feel cooler looking at the shaved dog but it sure isn't making the dog cooler. Why don't you do some research instead of believing in this harmful myth? I'm sick of it. Tired of people coming in lately asking for their double coated breed to be shaved for summer. It is stupid and makes me feel like crap when I can't convince them and then have to shave the dog.
    To understand via the heart is not to understand.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    Aug. 24, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jhein12 View Post
    Yes I have... looking at the anatomy of the coat it is common sense that it provides insulation and protection against the sun. You might be thinking of their coat like a winter coat on a person but it is not the same at all. This isn't new information either. Maybe it makes you feel cooler looking at the shaved dog but it sure isn't making the dog cooler. Why don't you do some research instead of believing in this harmful myth? I'm sick of it. Tired of people coming in lately asking for their double coated breed to be shaved for summer. It is stupid and makes me feel like crap when I can't convince them and then have to shave the dog.
    Ok, so this was a little harsh considering the very reason I posted is because I was NOT sure it was a good idea and wanted input, perhaps even input from people like yourself that do this for a living. So, maybe next time you could simply say something helpful about the coat's insulating qualities versus saying I am stupid for even considering it. I would consider my post "doing research" as you have suggested.

    As for everyone else, thanks for the input. I think I will speak with my dog's vet prior to making a decision.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    Aug. 20, 2003
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    138

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    But that reply was to another poster. I feel her first reply to your question was to the point and answered you. BTW, being an ex groomer I agree with not shaving coated dogs. I hated it, and felt that it was doing the dog a disservice. One of the reasons I decided grooming was not for me


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    Oct. 21, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by islgrl View Post
    Ok, so this was a little harsh considering the very reason I posted is because I was NOT sure it was a good idea and wanted input, perhaps even input from people like yourself that do this for a living. So, maybe next time you could simply say something helpful about the coat's insulating qualities versus saying I am stupid for even considering it. I would consider my post "doing research" as you have suggested.

    As for everyone else, thanks for the input. I think I will speak with my dog's vet prior to making a decision.
    If you read my first post I very nicely explain how it isn't a good idea to shave double coated breeds. I was responding to Simkie who despite what I had already said was ignorant enough to post their post. I'm glad you did some research here but it is good to get some sources outside of COTH too, and your vet is a good idea, so are articles online like this one :

    http://www.bluecrossanimalhospital.c...-summer-shave/

    Sorry to be harsh To Simkie but many people fight me on this and it is getting old.
    To understand via the heart is not to understand.



  13. #13
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    Dec. 14, 2006
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    VA
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    OP, try not to take the passionately divergent views too personally. Pro groomers are divided on this topic, with very passionate opinions and various resources supporting each opinion. I don't know of any actual controlled study -then there would be no debate!

    One thing to try before the can't-put-it-back-on-shave is a thorough, professional deshed to remove any packed undercoat. Maybe a middle of the road option is shaving the undercarriage.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
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    Sep. 17, 2013
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    116

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    We have our 3 Poms shaved every year. Just to give ME a break from grooming and the dragging in of yard debris every time they go potty. The hair always grows back, they LIKE being shaved, and they are cuter. They are never outside long enough to get hot, they live in the air conditioned house with us. I always said I would never have little hairy yip yips, not sure how we ended up with three. Love them dearly, but going to a short haired type when these three leave us.



  15. #15
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    Oct. 21, 2013
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bicoastal View Post
    OP, try not to take the passionately divergent views too personally. Pro groomers are divided on this topic, with very passionate opinions and various resources supporting each opinion. I don't know of any actual controlled study -then there would be no debate!

    One thing to try before the can't-put-it-back-on-shave is a thorough, professional deshed to remove any packed undercoat. Maybe a middle of the road option is shaving the undercarriage.
    I found some seemingly legitimate scientific information on the subject...

    http://sonic.net/~cdlcruz/GPCC/library/hairlength.htm
    To understand via the heart is not to understand.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2007
    Location
    Montana
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    6,119

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    Oh good lord.

    I have a triple coated Aussie/Golden cross dog-and she LIVES for the day she gets clipped. In our small rural town, that meant nearly to the skin from ears to tail, wham bam. She loved it, her coat grew back the same every single year. She's 14.5 now and going in for her 14th cut. NO PROBLEM.

    I clipped our purebred Aussie-no problem.

    I see clipped Aussies/ect all day long here. It's a summer tradition here to clip fuzzy dogs in the summer and it is a wham/bam job across the board. Dogs love it, no shedding, no coat problems... easy and done.

    I have a Great Pyrenees that suffers in the summer if he isn't clipped on his belly. I don't clip him all around b/c he needs that hide when he fights coyotes, which he does. but if I clip his belly and chest he can cool off in the dirt he digs up during the day. I don't honestly really think his "insulating coat" is working for him...

    I have the hardest time tracking this board sometimes. I live in the land of practical dog ownership. Dogs live normal lives, long happy normal lives. When I read here sometimes I see micromanagement to the abstract degree.

    It's a dog, it's hot and fuzzy-clip it. done.
    “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey


    5 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Minnesota
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    This is my expereince:

    Elderly Samoyed, unclipped, very well groomed: miserable in the Colorado summers.

    Elderly Samoyed, clipped in early spring: very happy in Colorado summer, I totally believe clipping her extended her life.

    I was brought up in the Samoyed show culture where clipping is verboten and the "clipping = a hotter dog" bias is deeply ingrained. I know how to strip under coat from a dog. Doing so was *not enough* as she got older. Clipping was AWESOME for her.

    ilsgrl, just clip your dog. Keep it out of the sun until it gets enough coat to act as sun screen. Groom well in the fall to prevent mats. Your dog will thank you


    4 members found this post helpful.

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